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Article

G. Nilay Yücenur and Anıl Sezer Subaşı

The purpose of this study is to select the most appropriate city in Turkey for space shuttle launching ramp.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to select the most appropriate city in Turkey for space shuttle launching ramp.

Design/methodology/approach

In the proposed approach, an integrated methodology is used. The SWARA method is used in the first phase of the solution for determining criteria’s importance weights. Based on the criteria weights obtained by the SWARA method, the WASPAS method is used for selecting the best alternative.

Findings

Mugla is selected for the most suitable city for the first space shuttle launching pad according to determined criteria and proposed model.

Research limitations/implications

Although there are 81 cities in Turkey, 4 alternatives were selected for evaluation. It is possible to eliminate this limitation by the future studies with the implementation of proposed model to entire of Turkey.

Practical implications

This proposed model can be used by the countries which want to have a new or first space shuttle launching ramp in the world.

Originality/value

Although some climatic conditions are pointed out on the location of the space shuttle launching ramp, in literature, there is not a comprehensive and detailed evaluation example as much as the model proposed in this study. Therefore, this study is the first in terms of the proposed model and applied techniques in the sectoral sense. In addition, the study is also a guide for solving the original model which is revealed in the selection of the most suitable alternative city for space shuttle launching ramp by different multi-criteria decision-making methods.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 91 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

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Article

TO say that the Twenty‐fourth S.B.A.C. Show was an unqualified success is perhaps to gild the lily. True there were disappointments— the delay which kept the TSR‐2 on the…

Abstract

TO say that the Twenty‐fourth S.B.A.C. Show was an unqualified success is perhaps to gild the lily. True there were disappointments— the delay which kept the TSR‐2 on the ground until well after the Show being one—but on the whole the British industry was well pleased with Farnborough week and if future sales could be related to the number of visitors then the order books would be full for many years to come. The total attendance at the Show was well over 400,000—this figure including just under 300,000 members of the public who paid to enter on the last three days of the Show. Those who argued in favour of allowing a two‐year interval between the 1962 Show and this one seem to be fully vindicated, for these attendance figures are an all‐time record. This augurs well for the future for it would appear that potential customers from overseas are still anxious to attend the Farnborough Show, while the public attendance figures indicate that Britain is still air‐minded to a very healthy degree. It is difficult to pick out any one feature or even one aircraft as being really outstanding at Farnborough, but certainly the range of rear‐engined civil jets (HS. 125, BAC One‐Eleven, Trident and VCIQ) served as a re‐minder that British aeronautical engineering prowess is without parallel, while the number of rotorcraft to be seen in the flying display empha‐sized the growing importance of the helicopter in both civil and military operations. As far as the value of Farnborough is concerned, it is certainly a most useful shop window for British aerospace products, and if few new orders are actually received at Farnborough, a very large number are announced— as our ’Orders and Contracts' column on page 332 bears witness. It is not possible to cover every exhibit displayed at the Farnborough Show but the following report describes a wide cross‐section beginning with the exhibits of the major airframe and engine companies.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

THE Farnborough 1966 Show was at first glance much the same mixture as before, but the second glance was the more revealing. The participation in the flying display of…

Abstract

THE Farnborough 1966 Show was at first glance much the same mixture as before, but the second glance was the more revealing. The participation in the flying display of European aircraft by no means swamped the air, even if the Italian verve took the acrobatic honours, but the theme of collaboration with other countries was to be found on practically every stand inside the exhibition tent. It was obvious that the smaller firms not directly involved in production agreements with other nations were very export conscious. The pacemaker of all this collaboration was of course the Concorde, only to be seen in model form, but rapidly taking shape at Toulouse and Filton, and many of the equipment manufacturers had Concorde hardware on display. Beagle announced the Pup, Britten‐Norman produced the production Islander, and Handley Page showed the Jetstream mock‐up. After many years of neglect, the industry is now taking an interest in the general aviation market. The P.1127 (R.A.F.) made its first appearance. The paradox of the P.1127 is that it is almost a part of Farnborough history, yet there is no other V/S.T.O.L. aircraft in the world that has but a fraction of the operating experience it has gained. Farnborough this year gave the impression of being more a serious trade show, and less a public spectacle. Sir Richard Smeeton, Director of the Society of British Aerospace Companies, reported that the exhibiting firms had received more serious business enquiries this year than ever before, and he forecast that 1968 would be a vintage year, which would see the appearance of the HS.801, the Concorde and Jaguar in the Farnborough skies. It is not possible to cover every exhibit shown at the Farnborough Show, but the following report describes a wide cross‐section beginning with the exhibits of the major airframe and engine companies.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Teemu Laine, Tuomas Korhonen, Petri Suomala and Asta Rantamaa

This paper aims to elaborate the concepts of boundary subjects and boundary objects in constructing and communicating relevant accounting facts for managing product…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to elaborate the concepts of boundary subjects and boundary objects in constructing and communicating relevant accounting facts for managing product development (PD). Boundary subjects as reflective actors benefit effective accounting enactment, by building a shared understanding about different actors’ roles and information needs, and by helping to respond to these needs with new boundary objects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a longitudinal interventionist case study of a machinery manufacturer. The focus of this case study was the production ramp-up phase at the end of a PD program. Different actors’ needs were first collected and elaborated by interventionist researchers (boundary subjects). Then accounting prototypes (boundary objects) provided new means of communication.

Findings

The findings show that dealing with boundaries is crucial in accounting development. The role of boundary subjects was fundamental in the process of choosing, constructing, elaborating and communicating accounting facts. During this process, accounting prototypes integrated new accounting facts, the boundary subjects mitigated the boundaries and the boundary objects focused and restricted communication about accounting facts.

Research limitations/implications

The paper tests the pragmatic constructivism approach by examining accounting enactment under uncertainty and ambiguity. The study refines pragmatic constructivism in terms of boundaries, boundary subjects as actors and boundary objects.

Practical implications

The intentional use of boundary subjects and objects as communication platform could push a more active inclusion of business controllers as active business partners.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature on accounting development by highlighting the use of boundary subjects and boundary objects as fundamental mechanisms in constructing and communicating accounting facts.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

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Article

BRITISH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION has current major programmes in transport aircraft, military aircraft, guided weapons and space. It is this width of technology, and the…

Abstract

BRITISH AIRCRAFT CORPORATION has current major programmes in transport aircraft, military aircraft, guided weapons and space. It is this width of technology, and the extent of the facilities which support it, which make BAC one of the major aerospace companies of the world. Currently, BAC has a record £686m on its order books, of which £440m is for export.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 46 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Kin Wai Michael Siu, Jia Xin Xiao and Yi Lin Wong

This study aims to address policy, implementation and management, the three stages of inclusive open space. It compares both the level of design and implementation of open…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address policy, implementation and management, the three stages of inclusive open space. It compares both the level of design and implementation of open space in Beijing, Hong Kong and Taipei by following the inclusive guidelines. It also identifies recommendations for policy, implementation and management of inclusive open space and its facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Field observations were conducted in 27 parks within three cities. In-depth interviews were conducted with a variety of participants, including visually impaired persons, government officers, representatives of non-governmental organisations, local communities and experts.

Findings

Most of the so-called inclusive environments and facilities have not been user-friendly in actual practice. The findings suggest that policies are an essential precondition; however, implementation and management must not be ignored because they ensure the effectiveness of inclusive design.

Research limitations/implications

Comprehensive and continuous studies on the proposed framework are recommended throughout the policy, implementation and management processes.

Practical implications

The findings serve as a reference and direction for taking a holistic approach to inclusive design of open space in densely populated cities.

Social implications

This study examines the levels of inclusive open space and illustrates how to provide barrier-free environments that can be used by the widest spectrum of people.

Originality/value

This study evaluates policy, implementation and management in the three cities based on 29 guidelines generated from seven principles of inclusive design. A research framework is proposed for researchers and policymakers to consider how to achieve effective inclusive open spaces.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Book part

Loic Vadelorge

The development of public art in French New Towns in the 1970s and 1980s was one of the most spectacular forms of state intervention in urban policy. Along with the new…

Abstract

The development of public art in French New Towns in the 1970s and 1980s was one of the most spectacular forms of state intervention in urban policy. Along with the new architecture programmes, the hundreds of works of art that adorn the public realm of the French New Towns help to differentiate them from the grands ensembles. This public art, which was highly publicised at the time, represents a heritage intrinsically linked to the urban history of New Towns but also to the history of French cultural policies at the end of the twentieth century. Artistic and town planning innovations underlie many public art projects. Artists and town planners participated, on a city scale, in the cultural developments that sought to respond to the expectations of the May 1968 crisis. In New Towns, the role of art was not simply to provide a backdrop to beautify the city but also to contribute to the success of new urban neighbourhoods. This involved placing visual landmarks in the urban space, confronting the residents with living art (painted walls, sculpted staircases, light paths, etc.).

The appropriation of these works of art by the public and councils was far from unanimous. It was only at the beginning of the twenty-first century that a heritage reflection emerged and led to a list of works of art being drawn up, with a view to protecting them. With the disappearance of state supervision over certain New Towns (1998–2002), damaged works has become a stigma in the public realm. A policy of restoration is being therefore introduced in certain New Towns, with public art participating in the identity of councils that do not hesitate to present themselves as ‘contemporary towns’ and take on the restoration or achievement of certain works that they now consider to be their heritage.

Details

Lessons from British and French New Towns: Paradise Lost?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-430-9

Keywords

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Article

Maureen Wade

The Library of the London School of Economics and Political Science is the largest library in the world devoted to the social sciences, with some four million items. In a…

Abstract

The Library of the London School of Economics and Political Science is the largest library in the world devoted to the social sciences, with some four million items. In a major redevelopment project, the library’s building, which also houses the LSE Research Laboratory, has been radically re‐designed by Foster and Partners. Key features of the re‐design include a central atrium with a glass dome and stepped helical ramp as well as a double height space on the lower ground floor. During the building programme, the library operated from temporary premises nearby, remaining open throughout two book moves. Describes the planning process involved in the redevelopment, the maintenance of services and the book moves. User reaction to the re‐designed building has been positive and there has been a great deal of interest from librarians and members of the public.

Details

New Library World, vol. 103 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article

Stephen M. Verba

Marketing managers in high technology and information industriesare a victim of paradigms, processes and tools developed out of the massmarket packaged good industries…

Abstract

Marketing managers in high technology and information industries are a victim of paradigms, processes and tools developed out of the mass market packaged good industries. These constitute an implicit set of “rules of engagement” by which such marketers are constrained. Posits a new set of “rules of engagement” from the macro level of “core competency” versus SBUs to the micro level of long interviews and semiotics versus traditional focus groups. These are concatenated into an alternate process for new product testing and development.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article

Basil Clarke and Terence E. Ford

Fifty years ago ,on 21st May 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed on this very field, Le Bourget, after having made the first non‐stop Atlantic crossing from New York to Paris…

Abstract

Fifty years ago ,on 21st May 1927, Charles Lindbergh landed on this very field, Le Bourget, after having made the first non‐stop Atlantic crossing from New York to Paris. Several days earlier, Nungesser and Coli met their tragic end in attempting the flight from Paris to New York, an exploit that Costes and Bellonte succeeded in making only three years later.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 49 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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