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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Sheila Corrall

The research explores the emerging specialty of learning space assessment with a focus on how new information professionals represented by graduate students in an academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The research explores the emerging specialty of learning space assessment with a focus on how new information professionals represented by graduate students in an academic libraries course defined quality criteria for library spaces and how they approached designing and conducting a one-shot multi-site space assessment project.

Design/methodology/approach

The instructor-investigator adopted a diachronic collective case study strategy, using documents generated by six cohorts over three academic years. The data included 180 online discussion posts, 97 individual site assessments and 32 group project reports. Data were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively to identify patterns and trends in student behaviour.

Findings

The analysis revealed a strong trend among students for creating their own evaluation frameworks in preference to reusing existing professional tools in their current form; the proportion of students who developed their own criteria or combined existing criteria in new ways shifted from 40 per cent to 80 per cent in three years. Their approaches demonstrated willingness and ability to engage in independent and creative thinking, and readiness to explore interdisciplinary and international perspectives on space. They also displayed a commitment to accessible, flexible and adaptable user-centred design for active, collaborative learning and to bringing a user perspective to their observations.

Originality/value

The focus on student-librarians provides a unique forward-looking perspective on the desirable qualities of next-generation learning spaces in academic libraries. The study documents an unprecedented range of established and novel space evaluation frameworks and tools informed by different professional disciplines. The results should be of interest to library and information science (LIS) educators and practitioners.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Geoffrey T. Crisp

This chapter will explore how assessment might look in next generation learning spaces where we have the potential to merge physical and virtual activities. Students now…

Abstract

This chapter will explore how assessment might look in next generation learning spaces where we have the potential to merge physical and virtual activities. Students now have ready access to a world of resources within their classroom and this fundamentally changes the nature of learning and assessment. The trend toward gamification of learning and assessment will be examined and the issue of assessment in new educational environments such as MOOCs will be explored. The impact of the semantic web (Web 3.0), where web objects and their context are all linked and objects have memory of how an individual student used them on previous occasions, will be discussed.

Next generation learning spaces encapsulate the affordances of both physical and virtual spaces and yet many assessment tasks are still designed as if students occupied only one of these spaces. Teachers will need to design more authentic, meaningful tasks that will engage students in using the full range of their capabilities and available resources, both physical and virtual. Students come together physically to engage in the social construction of their knowledge and can use the virtual spaces to broaden the social dimension of their learning environment.

Gamification of learning and assessment will require new approaches to defining tasks as teachers will need to decide how to incorporate diagnostic, formative, and summative assessment components within a more holistic educational environment. Game theory will be blended with learning theory in curriculum design and will result in the redesign of learning and assessment activities that are based on engagement (flow), user needs, and an evidence-centered design approach.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Stan Trembach, Jayne Blodgett, Annie Epperson and Natasha Floersch

The purpose of this paper is to advocate for change in academic library space assessment and use philosophy in favor of a more user-centered approach emphasizing space

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advocate for change in academic library space assessment and use philosophy in favor of a more user-centered approach emphasizing space designed for and by users themselves. This goal is achieved by analyzing the implementation of a recent space assessment project at the University of Northern Colorado Libraries to investigate specific patterns of library space utilization.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a case study for which data were collected through a multi-method approach, including flip chart and whiteboard questions, brief semi-structured “tabling” interviews, and more in-depth “roving” interviews.

Findings

The current library literature on space assessment does not encompass broader, more holistic approaches to how library space is used by students, faculty, staff and community users. The findings from this study highlight the diversity of ways patrons may use an academic library, many of which are related to academic work. However, visitors also come to the library for other purposes, such as socializing or attending an event. It is imperative that the space be adequately equipped to meet varied visitor needs and to create a welcoming environment for all patrons.

Originality/value

The paper has several implications for planning and managing the operations of medium-sized academic libraries. It contributes to the larger conversation in higher education about the importance of user research for enhancing visitor experience through data-informed decision-making. Furthermore, the project it details is not an isolated assessment effort but part of the library’s ongoing space assessment work.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2018

Kristina A. Clement, Sian Carr, Lauren Johnson, Alexa Carter, Brianne Ramsay Dosch, Jordan Kaufman, Rachel Fleming-May, Regina Mays and Teresa Walker

The University of Tennessee Knoxville’s Libraries has set aside space and stocked it with treadmill desks, standing desks, cycling desks and balance chairs to encourage…

Abstract

Purpose

The University of Tennessee Knoxville’s Libraries has set aside space and stocked it with treadmill desks, standing desks, cycling desks and balance chairs to encourage physical activity while using library space to promote active learning. The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of this innovative space on library users through a study conducted by a research team using observations and short surveys to gather information about usage trends and user perceptions of this “active learning space.”

Design/methodology/approach

This study used both ethnographish observation and self-selected survey. Researcher observation notes were used to gather usage rates of the space and equipment in the space, and survey responses were coded for themes to identify user perceptions around the space.

Findings

The findings strongly suggest that users find mental and physical health value in the “active learning space” and many would find value in the expansion and improvement of the space.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study include a shorter observation period compared to the survey collection period and limited demographic collection to shorten the survey instrument.

Originality/value

However, this study was able to assess how an active learning space in an academic library can influence and have a significant impact on student success.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Mike Keppell

This chapter will explore how the places of learning might look in next generation learning spaces where learners traverse physical and virtual spaces using personalised…

Abstract

This chapter will explore how the places of learning might look in next generation learning spaces where learners traverse physical and virtual spaces using personalised learning strategies. It will examine how learning spaces may represent ubiquitous spaces in which the learner undertakes some form of study or learning. Although there has been extensive examination of the design of spaces for knowledge generation (Keppell & Riddle, 2012, 2013; Souter, Riddle, Sellers, & Keppell, 2011) there has been little attention given to how learners customise and personalise their own physical and virtual learning spaces as they traverse their learning journey. Seven principles of learning space design will be adapted for use by the personalised learner. Personalised learning strategies encompass a range of knowledge, skills and attitudes that empower the learner to take charge of their learning within next generation learning spaces. Personalised learning consists of six broad concepts: digital citizenship, seamless learning, learner engagement, learning-oriented assessment, lifelong and life-wide learning and desire paths. Teachers will need to assist learners to design their own personalised learning spaces throughout formal education to encourage learners to be autonomous learners throughout their lifetime. In order to assist learners in developing personalised learning strategies we need to teach them about learning space literacies. We can’t assume learners have the knowledge, skills and attitudes to be able to identify and effectively utilise appropriate learning spaces that optimises engagement.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Sheila Corrall

The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of library space assessment, and to investigate how new professionals, represented by a cohort of graduate…

1064

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of library space assessment, and to investigate how new professionals, represented by a cohort of graduate students taking a course on academic libraries, approached the task of designing and conducting a one-shot space evaluation project.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of literature on academic library space was used to introduce the project to student participants and to put the results of their work in context. Seven student groups were required to define their evaluation criteria, conduct quality assessments at individual sites and perform a cross-case analysis to inform recommendations for improvements.

Findings

The literature confirmed growing interest in learning space assessment, with a trend toward the use of mixed (quantitative and qualitative) methods, particularly ethnographic techniques using multimedia, and the development of comprehensive toolkits and frameworks. The students used a range of approaches: three groups developed their own evaluation criteria or categories (informed by their reading), and four groups used existing tools (with modifications). All used observations to collect data. Variations across the cohort pointed to different priorities in professional and/or personal values.

Research limitations/implications

The research was based on a small sample of 20 students in one cohort. Replication of the study with future cohorts tasked with the same assignment would strengthen the validity of the findings.

Originality/value

The study offers a novel perspective on the desirable qualities of learning spaces by exploring how graduate librarianship students as both student library users and next-generation professionals specify evaluation criteria and conduct space assessments.

Details

Performance Measurement and Metrics, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-8047

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2021

Ahmed Eweda, Abobakr Al-Sakkaf, Tarek Zayed and Sabah Alkass

The purpose of this study is to develop a condition assessment (CA) model for a building's indoor 21 environments and to improve the building's asset management process.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a condition assessment (CA) model for a building's indoor 21 environments and to improve the building's asset management process.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on dividing the building into spaces, which are the principal evaluated elements based on the building's indoor environmental quality (IEQ). An evaluation scheme was prepared for the identified factors and the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) technique was used to calculate the relative weight of each space inside the building as well as the contribution of each IEQ factors (IEQFs) in the overall environmental condition of each space inside the building. The multi-attribute utility theory (MAUT) was then applied to assess the environmental conditions of the building as a whole and its spaces. An educational building in Canada was evaluated using the developed model.

Findings

Each space type was found to have its own IEQFs weights, which confirms the hypothesis that the importance and allocation of each IEQF are dependent on the function and tasks carried out in each space. A similar indoor environmental assessment score was calculated using the developed model and the building CA conducted by the facility management team; “89%” was calculated, using K-mean clustering, for the physical and environmental conditions.

Originality/value

IEQ affects occupants' assessment of their quality of life (QOL). Despite the existence of IEQ evaluation models that correlate the building's IEQ and the occupants' perceived indoor assessments, some limitations have led to the necessity of developing a comprehensive model that integrates all factors and their sub-criteria in an assessment scheme that converts all the indoor environmental factors into objective metrics.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Mahbub Rashid, Kent Spreckelmeyer and Neal J. Angrisano

The study seeks to investigate the mechanisms for the effects of environmental design features of a green building on occupants' environmental awareness (EA) and…

6082

Abstract

Purpose

The study seeks to investigate the mechanisms for the effects of environmental design features of a green building on occupants' environmental awareness (EA) and organizational image (OI).

Design/methodology/approach

One mechanism investigated the direct effects of environmental design features of a green building on occupants' EA and OI. The other mechanism investigated the indirect effects on occupants' EA and OI resulting from the direct effects of environmental design features on occupants' workplace satisfaction. The data were collected from 175 occupants of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)‐certified green building using a questionnaire instrument.

Findings

Based on frequency, correlational, and regression analyses of the data, the study found no evidence for direct effects of environmental design features on occupants' EA and OI. The study, however, found some evidence for indirect effects, indicating that individual workspace and departmental space features affected occupants' satisfaction with individual workspaces and the building, which then affected occupants' EA and OI.

Research limitations/implications

The study involved only the employees of an organization who occupy a single LEED‐certified green building. Future studies should involve a larger sample of green buildings. Future studies should also involve other stakeholders of these buildings.

Practical implications

The study is important for the long‐term market growth of green buildings, because it provides supporting evidence for the organizational leaders who want to use green buildings to enhance organizational values and benefits.

Originality/value

The study makes an original contribution to the field, because studies focusing on the potential links between green buildings and organizational benefits and values, and the mechanisms that may help explain these links are still rare.

Book part
Publication date: 29 April 2019

Mark Bieraugel

Supporting entrepreneurship and innovation is a goal for many college campuses. How can your library support those goals? Should you add a makerspace to your library? Or…

Abstract

Supporting entrepreneurship and innovation is a goal for many college campuses. How can your library support those goals? Should you add a makerspace to your library? Or make other costly changes? Library spaces help students think at a higher level, to be creative, innovative, and entrepreneurial. It is rare to have a dedicated spot on campus for thinking. Our libraries are those spaces. Spaces that strongly foster entrepreneurial thinking range from quiet reflective spaces to noisy collaborative spaces. You do not need to do an elaborate study to understand your library spaces. To assess your library spaces as they relate to innovative and entrepreneurial thinking, first take an inventory of your existing library spaces. By examining your existing spaces and the activities in them, you see which of the six essential types of spaces you have and which ones you lack. Once you have done a space assessment, you can see how you can readily add any of the six spaces you lack. A case study of an academic library’s space inventory, assessment, and recommendations helps illustrate the process. You use your space inventory for present and future space planning and to communicate your worth to your stakeholders. Libraries can market unique spaces to students (e.g. “Here are spaces to help you think creatively”), support Creative Campus initiatives, and promote library spaces which foster entrepreneurial thinking.

Details

Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-206-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Casey J. McNellis

Anecdotal evidence indicates that one of the more difficult issues faced by accounting students is the understanding and preparation of the statement of cash flows (SCF)…

Abstract

Purpose

Anecdotal evidence indicates that one of the more difficult issues faced by accounting students is the understanding and preparation of the statement of cash flows (SCF). This study investigates the impact of different instruction methods for covering the statement on student learning outcomes. Currently, two prominent intermediate-level financial accounting texts cover the SCF primarily in one end-of-text chapter, a massed presentation. The current study argues that the SCF is a topic that is cross-sectional in nature, and is applicable to the textbook material on the accounting transactions that are spread throughout the texts. In accordance with the spacing effect (Dempster, 1988), instruction of SCF material across the major recognition and measurement topic chapters, a spaced presentation format, potentially yields enhanced learning outcomes in comparison to the massed presentation.

Methodology/approach

Across three semesters of an intermediate-level financial accounting course, the SCF delivery format and coverage were varied in a 1 × 3 between-subjects experiment. The subjects completed an indirect-method SCF preparation task, which I analyzed across the three conditions.

Findings

Students learning the SCF presentation of intermediate-level transactions in a spaced presentation earned higher scores on the task compared to those learning the material in a massed format. Furthermore, the students exposed to the massed presentation performed no better than those not instructed on the material.

Research limitations/implications

I base my findings on the results of one assessment of the SCF in one course. Future research should consider various tasks related to the SCF at different course levels and across a variety of instructional techniques.

Originality/value

The results imply that changes to the delivery of SCF material could potentially produce benefits to student learning.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-646-1

Keywords

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