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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2019

Soyeon Kim, Xinran Lehto and Jay Kandampully

The primary purpose of this study is to examine the effects of destination familiarity on consumers’ evaluations (cognitive image) and feelings (affective image) about the…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose of this study is to examine the effects of destination familiarity on consumers’ evaluations (cognitive image) and feelings (affective image) about the destination, leading to their intention to visit.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected through a Web-based survey. Based on a sample of 460 respondents, structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that familiarity with a destination not only influences consumers’ cognitive evaluations of the destination but also affects their feelings about it, which translates into their intentions in travelling to the destination. The findings indicate that destination familiarity can enhance consumers’ knowledge about the destination, but more importantly, their affective perceptions can lead to a higher likelihood of visiting a destination.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful guidance for efficient marketing programs to attract more visitors to a certain tourist destination. Destination marketers must assess the level of familiarity of potential travelers in the development, design and promotion of a destination. This understanding will enable the marketers to more effectively communicate with their target markets and allow them to tailor advertising to different segments of their customers based on their familiarity.

Originality/value

The majority of previous studies regarding destination familiarity tend to measure the overall familiarity or experiential familiarity (e.g. a comparison between visitors vs non-visitors) without considering consumers’ indirect familiarity with a destination. This study attempts to conceptualize and empirically test the role of destination familiarity on consumers’ cognitive and affective images and intentions.

Purpose

本研究的主要目的是探讨消费者的目的地熟悉度对其对目的地的评价(认知形象)和感受(情感形象)的影响, 从而得出消费者的旅游意向。

Design/methodology/approach

本研究通过网络调查收集数据, 并以460名受访者为样本, 采用结构方程模型对所提假设进行检验。

Findings

结果表明, 消费者对目的地的熟悉程度不仅会影响消费者对目的地的认知评价, 还会影响他们对目的地的感受, 进而影响他们前往目的地的意愿。研究还发现, 目的地熟悉度可以增强消费者对目的地的认知;更重要的是, 他们的情感感知会使他们前往目的地的可能性有所提高。

Practical implications

研究结果可为开展高效的营销计划提供有益指导, 以吸引更多的游客到特定的旅游目的地。目的地营销人员必须评估潜在游客对目的地的开发、设计和推广方面的熟悉程度;在了解了这些之后, 营销人员方可更有效地与目标市场进行沟通, 并根据各个客户群体不同的熟悉程度对其投放定制化广告。

Originality/value

以往大多数关于目的地熟悉度的研究倾向于测量总体熟悉度或经验熟悉度(例如比较游客与非游客之间的差别), 而不考虑消费者对目的地的间接熟悉程度。本研究试图将目的地熟悉度对消费者认知、情感意象和旅游意向的影响概念化, 并加以实证检验。

Propósito

El objetivo principal de este estudio es examinar los efectos de la familiaridad en las evaluaciones de los consumidores (imagen cognitiva) y sentimiento (imagen afectiva) sobre los destinos, y como influye en su intención para visitarlo.

Diseño/Metodología/aproximación

Los datos de este estudio fueron obtenidos a través de una encuesta web. Apoyado en una muestra de 460 respuestas, se utilizo la modelización de ecuaciones estructurales para testear las hipótesis propuestas.

Resultados

Los resultados muestran que la familiaridad con el destino no sólo influye en las evaluaciones cognitivas de los consumidores, sino también afecta a los sentimientos de estos, lo que se traslada a sus intenciones de viajar al destino turístico en cuestión. Los resultados indican que la familiaridad con el destino puede mejorar el conocimieto de los consumidores sobre éste, pero lo más importante, es la percepción afectiva, la cual puede liderar una mayor confianza para visitarlo.

Implicaciones practicas

Los resultados proveen una guía útil en la eficiencia de los programas de marketing para atraer más visitantes a un determinado destino. Los gestores de destinos deben evaluar el nivel de familiaridad de los potenciales viajeros en el desarrollo, diseño, y promoción de un destino. Entender estás cuestiones, hará a los gestores de destino más efectivos en su comunicación con sus mercados objetivos y les permitirá adaptar la publicidad a diferentes segmentos de clientes, en función de su familiaridad.

Originalidad/valor

La mayoría de estudios previos, respecto a la familiaridad en los destinos, tienden a medir la familiaridad de forma global o experimental (por ejemplo, una comparación entre visitantes y no visitantes) sin considerar el efecto indirecto de la familiaridad con un destino. Este estudio sirve para conceptualizar y empíricamente testar, el papel de la familiaridad del destino en la imágenes e intenciones cognitivas y afectivas de los consumidores.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Jessica Marie Arokiasamy and Soyeon Kim

As globalization expands opportunities for foreign investments, the role of expatriates is becoming important for business success in host countries. Cross-cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

As globalization expands opportunities for foreign investments, the role of expatriates is becoming important for business success in host countries. Cross-cultural adjustment (CCA) of expatriates is considered significant in determining business success in host countries. This study investigated the issue among Japanese expatriates in Malaysia. The purposes of this study were to unravel the influence of emotional intelligence (EI) on CCA and clarify the facilitating role of cultural intelligence (CI) on the relationship between EI and CCA.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was administered to 107 Japanese parent country nationals (PCNs) working at Japanese subsidiaries in Malaysia.

Findings

The findings show that EI positively influences the subdimensions of CCA, namely, CCA–general, CCA–social and CCA–work. A notable finding is that CI facilitates the positive effect of EI on CCA–social.

Research implications

The findings advance the existing studies on expatriate management by delving into the CCA issue with two culturally distinctive countries that have rarely been studied in this research domain, Japan and Malaysia. This study further contributes to prior studies by clarifying a boundary condition in which EI functions better in enhancing expatriates' CCA.

Practical implications

The findings provide Japanese multinational corporations (MNCs) valuable directions and strategic ideas in the realm of expatriate management. Such insights can contribute to business success in host countries.

Originality/value

Diverting from the conventional West–East approach in expatriate management studies, this study took an East–East orientation and explored the relationships among EI, CI and CCA. By proving that CI stimulates the positive effect of EI on CCA, this study underlines the significantly interactive effects of two distinctive individual capabilities on enhancing expatriates' CCA. It further highlights that CI should take on importance in attempts to understand CCA, even in seemingly culturally similar East–East nations.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Soyeon Kim and Mannsoo Shin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of gender on the effectiveness of transformational leadership. Drawing on role congruity theory, it elucidates…

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2261

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of gender on the effectiveness of transformational leadership. Drawing on role congruity theory, it elucidates the moderating effects of leader gender, subordinate gender, and leader-subordinate gender dyad on the relationship between transformational leadership and psychological empowerment.

Design/methodology/approach

Employees of companies in Korea responded to a paper-pencil survey, rating their psychological empowerment and leadership behaviors of their direct leader on a five-point Likert-type scale. The analysis includes 339 responses.

Findings

The results indicate that a leader’s gender has no significant moderating effect on psychological empowerment, but the gender of the subordinate has a significant moderating effect, with male subordinates more strongly influenced by transformational leadership than female subordinates. Notably, the findings show that the effectiveness of transformational leadership is contingent on the leader-subordinate gender dyad. Specifically, transformational leadership has as significant an effect on female leader-male subordinate dyads as on male leader-male subordinate dyads.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to leadership and gender studies in the management field by investigating the effect of gender roles on the effectiveness of transformational leadership. Future research should extend this study and explore whether these findings are generalizable.

Practical implications

The remarkable finding of the effect of female leadership on employee empowerment suggests organizations should use more female leaders.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to shed light on gender issues in relation to transformational leadership in Korea.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Soyeon Kim and Keiko Toya

Given the emergence of servitization as a viable strategy for manufacturers to gain a competitive advantage, determining what factors influence effective servitization is…

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1034

Abstract

Purpose

Given the emergence of servitization as a viable strategy for manufacturers to gain a competitive advantage, determining what factors influence effective servitization is imperative. Drawing on organizational change and leadership theories, the purpose of this paper is to identify the leadership styles required for successfully implementing servitization in Japan.

Design/methodology/approach

Via stratified sampling method, 5,000 Japanese manufacturers registered in the Tokyo Chamber of Commerce and Industry were selected for participation in a mail survey. Survey data from 187 responding CEOs were matched with firm-level archival data, after which the matched data were analyzed.

Findings

The findings indicated that industry type is important in implementing servitization, but firm size and performance are not. The results also revealed that charismatic leadership style is especially critical in implementing and elevating servitization, whereas autocratic and autonomous leadership styles impede this process.

Research limitations/implications

The study fills a gap in the literature by identifying a notable relationship between leadership style and servitization. Because the study was conducted in an Asian economic context, which has received less attention in servitization research, it advances the existing body of research on servitization by breaking the former geographical constraints in this field of studies.

Practical implications

This study presents practical implications for Japanese manufacturers who wish to devise a strategic leadership plan in the servitization process. CEOs of the firms can initiate the transition to servitization by employing charismatic leadership skills and convincing employees of the benefits of the change.

Originality/value

The research is distinguished from existing studies in that it provides the first empirical evidence on effective CEO leadership styles for servitization in Japanese manufacturing firms.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2017

Tomohiko Tanikawa, Soyeon Kim and Yuhee Jung

Based on socioemotional selectivity theory, the authors aimed to develop and test hypotheses that identify the direct effect of top management team (TMT) age diversity on…

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2581

Abstract

Purpose

Based on socioemotional selectivity theory, the authors aimed to develop and test hypotheses that identify the direct effect of top management team (TMT) age diversity on firms’ financial performance (return on equity [ROE], return on assets [ROA]) and the interactive effect of TMT age diversity and TMT average age on firms’ financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents results from a quantitative study of 867 TMTs in Korean manufacturing firms. Multiple hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that TMT age diversity had a negative and significant main effect on ROE but not on ROA. They also indicate that the negative relationship between TMT age diversity and firm performance (ROE) was attenuated when the members of TMTs were relatively older.

Originality/value

First, this study extends existing TMT research, which mainly focuses on macro factors, such as industry and environment, by using micro factors, including TMT age diversity and TMT average age. Second, this paper combines and extends previous TMT studies, which have been dominated by either “property” or “tendency”, by examining the interactive effect of the distributional property (diversity) and central tendency (average) of TMT age on firms’ financial performance. Finally, this study indicates that socioemotional selectivity theory may be useful to explain the link between TMT age diversity and firms’ financial performance.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Soyeon Kim, Jae-Eun Chung and YongGu Suh

This paper aims to explore multiple reference effects with regard to customers’ post-consumption evaluations in a cross-cultural context. The authors propose to test an…

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1297

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore multiple reference effects with regard to customers’ post-consumption evaluations in a cross-cultural context. The authors propose to test an integrative model of three types of reference effects (disconfirmation, attractiveness of alternatives and self-image congruity) and their relationship to customers’ evaluations associated with satisfaction and loyalty. Additional insight into the link between reference points and customer satisfaction is provided by examining the moderating influence of the cultural orientation of customers: South Korean (an Eastern, collectivist and high uncertainty avoidance culture) versus American (a Western, individualistic and low uncertainty avoidance culture).

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected through a Web-based survey. Based on a sample of 723 Korean and American consumers, multi-group analysis of structural equation modeling was used to test the proposed model and the moderating effect of culture.

Findings

Overall, the results indicated that American customers’ use of reference points in their post-consumption evaluations is significantly different from that of Korean customers. Specifically, disconfirmation had a stronger effect on Korean customers than on their American counterparts, whereas the attractiveness of alternatives had a stronger effect on American customers than on those from Korea. Moreover, self-image congruity was found to be equally important in both cultures.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the comparison of American and Korean participants in this study, these results may not be applied to customers from other countries. Moreover, the study is limited to post-consumption evaluations in restaurants and generalization of the results to other industries may be ill advised. Thus, further research is required to replicate the results and include customers from different countries in more diverse consumption settings.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful guidance for efficient marketing strategies to generate positive consumer outcomes across borders. Marketers must consider the interaction of cultures and customers to better understand customer perceptions and evaluations about their experiences. This understanding will enable the marketers to more effectively communicate with their target markets and allow them to tailor advertising to different segments of their customer base contingent upon their cultural orientations.

Originality/value

Although the role of reference effects has begun to attract considerable interest among consumer behavior researchers, much of this research has been conducted in a single cultural context. Because the global economy is becoming increasingly cross-cultural, it is valuable to conduct international consumer research to further the understanding of consumers’ post-consumption evaluation processes using multiple reference points from a global perspective.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2018

SoYeon Jung, Michael Dalbor and Seoki Lee

The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate the relationship between restaurant firms’ internationalization and systematic risk, and to further examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate the relationship between restaurant firms’ internationalization and systematic risk, and to further examine the relationship between internationalization and systematic risk based on the type of restaurant firm (i.e. limited-service vs full-service restaurants).

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes data from US-based publicly traded restaurant firms by estimating systematic risk based on the Carhart four-factor model and by performing a two-way random-effects model.

Findings

Findings support not only the risk-reduction effect of internationalization on systematic risk but also the moderating effect of the role of restaurant type on the relationship between internationalization and systematic risk. More specifically, the risk-reduction effect of internationalization on systematic risk is greater for limited-service than full-service restaurants.

Practical implications

The findings of this study can provide restaurant executives with more confidence in pursuing internationalization as part of their risk management strategy, acknowledging that more international operations could mitigate restaurant firms’ systematic risk. More specifically, limited-service restaurants can more significantly enjoy the risk-reduction benefits by increasing their international operations than full-service restaurants based on the findings of this study. Furthermore, risk-averse investors could consider purchasing shares of limited-service multinational restaurants’ stocks to enjoy more risk-reduction benefits.

Originality/value

By focusing on the restaurant industry with consideration for the restaurant type, this study provides more tailored recommendations for implementing internationalization strategies with regard to risk management.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

SoYeon Jung, Seoki Lee and Michael Dalbor

The purpose of the current study is to investigate the possible existence of a synergistic effect of internationalization and corporate social responsibility (CSR) on a…

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1493

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to investigate the possible existence of a synergistic effect of internationalization and corporate social responsibility (CSR) on a firm’s value performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To empirically test the argument, this study analyzed data from 40 US-based publicly traded restaurant companies (251 observations) from 2000 to 2011 by performing a two-way fixed-effects model.

Findings

This study’s findings support the hypothesis that when implemented simultaneously, internationalization and CSR have a negative synergistic impact on a restaurant firm’s value performance.

Practical implications

Restaurant managers might need to inquire thoroughly into the timing and content of CSR investment strategies while entering into new international markets. Restaurant executives may additionally need to focus more on effective risk management than other issues (e.g. growth or reputation) when developing both internationalization and CSR strategies simultaneously.

Originality/value

By suggesting and demonstrating a negative synergistic effect of internationalization and CSR on a firm’s value, this study presents new and unique insights into previous research regarding the combined effect of the two strategies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Sabrina Helm, Joyce Serido, Sun Young Ahn, Victoria Ligon and Soyeon Shim

The purpose of this study is to examine young consumers’ financial behavior (e.g. saving) and pro-environmental behavior (i.e. reduced consumption and green buying) as…

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3389

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine young consumers’ financial behavior (e.g. saving) and pro-environmental behavior (i.e. reduced consumption and green buying) as effective proactive strategies undertaken in the present to satisfy materialistic values and maximize well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on an online survey among a panel of young American adults (N = 968).

Findings

The study finds a positive effect of materialism on personal well-being and negative effects on financial satisfaction, proactive financial coping and reduced consumption, but no effect on green buying, a separate and distinct pro-environmental strategy. Both proactive financial coping and reduced consumption are positively associated with subjective well-being.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should re-examine conceptualizations of materialism in the context of climate change and the meaning of possessions in the global digital economy; studies could also focus on the specific well-being effects of reduced consumption and alternative pathways to align materialistic and environmental values.

Practical implications

Consumer education should look to models of financial education to demonstrate how limited natural resources can be managed at the micro level to enhance consumers’ subjective well-being, as well as reduce resource strain at the macro level.

Originality/value

Key contributions are the examination of materialism and consumption in the dual contexts of financial and environmental resource constraints and the effects of these key macro-social phenomena on consumers’ perceived well-being. Another study highlight is the differentiation of two strategies for proactive environmental coping, of which only one, reduced consumption, increased personal well-being and decreased psychological distress.

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

SoYeon Jung, Jungsun (Sunny) Kim and John Farrish

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a benchmark for hotel operators to understand in-room technology trends and the impact of in-room technology on business performance.

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4345

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a benchmark for hotel operators to understand in-room technology trends and the impact of in-room technology on business performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey questions are based on existing literature and suggestions from the American Hotel and Lodging Association Technology and E-commerce Committee. The authors collected 206 usable samples from managers, vice presidents, presidents, owners and executives from hotel companies and utilized cross-tab analysis and multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results demonstrate that installing specific in-room technologies can have a significant effect on enhancing the customer experience and increasing revenue. The study also presents the most commonly installed in-room technologies those hoteliers plan to install in the near future.

Research limitations/implications

Proper strategies are recommended to help hospitality managers understand the impact of different in-room technologies on the hospitality industry; particularly as they relate to guest experience and profitability.

Originality/value

By identifying the most popular in-room technologies currently available and examining which in-room technologies can be effective at enhancing guest experience and increasing revenue, this study fills the gap between the findings of previous studies and the observations from industry practitioners.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

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