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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Aisha K. Gill and Aviah Sarah Day

In May 2012, nine men from the Rochdale area of Manchester were found guilty of sexually exploiting a number of underage girls. Reporting on the trial, the media focussed…

Abstract

In May 2012, nine men from the Rochdale area of Manchester were found guilty of sexually exploiting a number of underage girls. Reporting on the trial, the media focussed on the fact that eight of the nine men were of Pakistani origin, while the girls were all white. It also framed similar cases in Preston, Rotherham, Derby, Shropshire, Oxford, Telford and Middlesbrough as ethnically motivated, thus creating a moral panic centred on South Asian grooming gangs preying on white girls. Despite the lack of evidence that the abuse perpetrated by some Asian men is distinct from male violence against women generally, the media focus on the grooming gang cases has constructed a narrative in which South Asian men pose a unique sexual threat to white girls. This process of ‘othering’ South Asian men in terms of abusive behaviour masks the fact that in the United Kingdom, the majority of sexual and physical abuse is perpetrated by white men; it simultaneously marginalises the sexual and domestic violence experienced by black and minority ethnic women. Indeed, the sexual abuse of South Asian women and girls is invisibilised within this binary discourse, despite growing concerns and evidence that the men who groomed the young girls in the aforementioned cases had also perpetrated domestic and sexual violence in their homes against their wives/partners. Through discourse analysis of newspaper coverage of these cases for the period 2012‒2018, this paper examines the British media's portrayal of South Asian men – particularly Pakistani men – in relation to child-grooming offences and explores the conditions under which ‘South Asian men’ have been constructed as ‘folk devils’. It also highlights the comparatively limited newspaper coverage of the abuse experiences and perspectives of Asian women and girls from the same communities to emphasise that violence against women and girls remains an ongoing problem across the nation.

Details

Gendered Domestic Violence and Abuse in Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-781-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Sunder Lokhande, Marewa Glover and Kyro Selket

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of chewing tobacco by South East Asian men in Auckland and their difficulty in giving up the habit.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the use of chewing tobacco by South East Asian men in Auckland and their difficulty in giving up the habit.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews with ten men were conducted in a grounded theory case study design. Snowball sampling was used to identify and recruit participants from hard‐to‐find populations. Written consents were obtained.

Findings

Each of the men attributed their initiation to chewing tobacco to the influence of friends and the society in which they lived. They all were aware that chewing tobacco could increase their risk for oral cancer and wanted to quit. New Zealand law prohibits the import and sale of oral forms of tobacco. However, the men in this study were still able to get chewing tobacco via friends and family bringing it into the country “for personal use”.

Research limitations/implications

This paper opens up a space for further research within the South East Asian communities, with the view to identifying and developing effective cessation methods.

Originality/value

This paper is significant as there has been minimal research conducted on the pervasiveness of chewing tobacco in the South East Asian communities in New Zealand.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Sally Wyke and Jackie Landman

Reports findings from a qualitative study using focus group discussions and individual interviews, about diet and cuisine among family members from a range of South Asian

2031

Abstract

Reports findings from a qualitative study using focus group discussions and individual interviews, about diet and cuisine among family members from a range of South Asian origins in Scotland. Most participants ate British style breakfasts and lunches but evening meals were eclectic in culinary styles. The widest ranges of cereal, pulse and vegetable foodstuffs were associated with South Asian style cuisine, British style cuisine was more likely to be associated with simple or convenience foods. Parents and some young people were very strongly committed to South Asian cuisine.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Baljit Kaur Rana, Carolyn Kagan, Suzan Lewis and Usha Rout

Even though an increasing number of British South Asian women have moved into paid employment over the years as a reflection of social and cultural mobility and change…

2181

Abstract

Even though an increasing number of British South Asian women have moved into paid employment over the years as a reflection of social and cultural mobility and change, their work‐family experiences are not widely reported. This paper examines the experiences of British South Asian full‐time managerial or professional women combining work and family life. A qualitative study based in the north‐west of England was conducted utilising semi‐structured interviews with 17 women. Five themes are discussed: cultural influences on domestic responsibilities; additional responsibilities and commitments to extended family and community members; work‐family priorities and “superwoman syndrome”; stereotypes of roles and responsibilities at work; and experiences of discrimination. Managerial or professional British South Asian women are subjected to the same cultural family commitments and expectations as other non‐professional British South Asian working women. Practical implications of the findings are related to managing diversity approaches and organisational culture change.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Andrew Tuck, Kamaldeep Bhui, Kiran Nanchahal and Kwame McKenzie

– The purpose of this paper is to calculate the rate of suicide in different religious groups in people of South Asian origin in the UK.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to calculate the rate of suicide in different religious groups in people of South Asian origin in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional, secondary analysis of a national data set. A name recognition algorithm was used to identify people of South Asian origin and their religion. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated using this data and data from the national census. Setting: a population study of all those who died by suicide in England and Wales in 2001. Participants: all cases of suicide and undetermined intent identified by the Office for National Statistics for England and Wales.

Findings

There were 4,848 suicides in the UK in 2001 of which 125 (2.6 percent) were identified as people of South Asian origin by the algorithm. The suicide rate for all people of South Asian origin was 5.50/100,000 compared to 9.31/100,000 for the population of England and Wales. The age SMR for those whose names were of Hindu, Muslim or Sikh origin were 0.88, 0.47 and 0.85, respectively. Female South Asians have lower rates of suicide, than their South Asian male counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

Religious classification by the computerized program does not guarantee religious affiliation. The data set were confined to one year because religion was not collected prior to the 2001 census.

Originality/value

The rates of suicide for South Asian sub-populations in the UK differ by gender and religion.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Mariana Bayley and Rachel Hurcombe

This paper reports drinking patterns among minority ethnic groups from the UK literature over the past 15 years, and considers the evidence for service provision and…

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Abstract

This paper reports drinking patterns among minority ethnic groups from the UK literature over the past 15 years, and considers the evidence for service provision and support. Findings show that drinking remains low among minority ethnic groups, though with evidence of increases in consumption, particularly among Indian women and Chinese men. South Asian men, particularly Sikh men, are over‐represented for liver cirrhosis, and some ethnic groups have higher than national average alcohol‐related deaths. People from black and minority ethnic backgrounds have similar rates of alcohol dependency as the white population; however services do not appear to be responsive enough to the needs of minority ethnic groups as they are under‐represented in seeking treatment and advice for drinking problems. Help‐seeking preferences vary for drinking problems between and within groups suggesting that drinking problems need to be addressed within both mainstream and specialist services. Greater understanding of cultural issues is needed in the development of alcohol services in mainstream and specialist settings.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 May 2009

Nusrat Husain, Nasim Chaudhry, Mohammed Husain and Waquas Waheed

Background: suicide prevention is a priority for health services in England. A high rate of suicide in South Asian women and a dramatic rise in young Afro‐Caribbean's has…

Abstract

Background: suicide prevention is a priority for health services in England. A high rate of suicide in South Asian women and a dramatic rise in young Afro‐Caribbean's has been reported in the UK.Aims: the aim of this selected review is to present the cultural context of suicidal behavior and possible preventive strategies for the South Asian and Afro‐Caribbean's living in the UK.Methods: relevant data about the cultural context of suicidal behavior in the two ethnic groups is reviewed.Findings: our findings suggest that socio‐cultural factors in women of South Asian origin and social risk factors and situational stress in Afro Caribbean's appears to be related to acts of self‐harm.Conclusions: we could not identify any published studies of effective suicide prevention strategies or on any treatment programmes for the two ethnic minority groups. Addressing the cultural, linguistic and religious need of these groups should be of paramount importance.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

SaunJuhi Verma

My research builds upon masculinity studies as well as migration and gender theory to evaluate emerging strategies of gendered labor control at work sites within temporary…

Abstract

My research builds upon masculinity studies as well as migration and gender theory to evaluate emerging strategies of gendered labor control at work sites within temporary worker programs. In particular, my multisite ethnography consisting of 97 interviews with US guest workers, oil industry employers, and Indian labor brokers shifts focus to the recruitment of male workers into the US oil industry. The study evaluated a multi-country recruitment chain from India to the Middle East and into the US Guest Worker Program. Findings identified a relationship between the construction of masculinities and employer strategies for labor control. The article addresses the following question: how is hegemonic masculinity used as a strategy for labor control? The study identifies the double bind of hegemonic masculinity within contingent employment relationships as a means of labor control for curbing male migrant dissent.

Details

Gendering Struggles against Informal and Precarious Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-368-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Gill Hague, Geetanjali Gangoli, Helen Joseph and Mary Alphonse

This paper looks at the experiences of first‐generation South Asian women who entered the UK to marry and then suffered domestic violence. It is based on an innovative and…

Abstract

This paper looks at the experiences of first‐generation South Asian women who entered the UK to marry and then suffered domestic violence. It is based on an innovative and collaborative trans‐national project, carried out in two stages. In the first stage, a range of immigrant South Asian women, who had experienced domestic violence, were consulted. This consultation aimed to ascertain what they believed would have been useful information, if available prior to immigration, about the UK and the life they might expect there, including what might happen in cases of marital discord and difficulties. The second stage of the project consisted of feeding that information back through meetings and consultations to relevant women's and state agencies in India, including the police, the media and women's organisations. While there is no evidence to suggest that immigrant black, minority ethnic and refugee women experience more domestic violence than majority white women, their experiences of abuse are different due to cultural factors, language, immigration status and lack of contact with natal families. The paper makes key recommendations on policy developments that would assist women in this situation, raising the voices of South Asian immigrant women in the UK, and highlighting their views and advice for policy‐makers and for other women considering such marriages.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Edwina Pio and Jawad Syed

This paper is a guest editorial piece in the Special Issue of the Gender in Management journal on “Gender equality at work in South Asia”. In this paper, the authors aim…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper is a guest editorial piece in the Special Issue of the Gender in Management journal on “Gender equality at work in South Asia”. In this paper, the authors aim not only to introduce the papers selected for the Special Issue but also to offer an overview of the current state of female employment, economic activity and gender equality at work in countries in South Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers a review of extant literature and macro‐economic data on gender equality in employment and management in South Asia.

Findings

Four stories emerge: firstly the pervasive existence of structural and institutional barriers such as patriarchal ideologies reinforced by gender inegalitarian interpretations of holy texts; secondly women's limited access to education and skill development; thirdly lack of non‐agricultural employment and economic resources resulting in economic dependence on men and sex‐based division of labour; and fourthly the development and joy of agency where there is facilitation and nurturance of women.

Originality/value

This Special Issue is probably the first ever collection of journal articles focused on gender equality at work in the South Asia region.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

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