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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Warat Winit and Sooksan Kantabutra

This paper aims to examine the relationship between stakeholders’ perceived benefits and happiness of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that follow Thai’s…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between stakeholders’ perceived benefits and happiness of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that follow Thai’s corporate sustainability practices, called sufficiency economy, and their impact on stakeholder–company relationship quality and firm performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Derived from the literature, a structural model, expressing the relationship between stakeholders’ perceived benefits and happiness of SMEs and their impact on stakeholder–company relationship quality and firm performance outcomes, was developed. A questionnaire survey was conducted with 636 stakeholders from sufficiency economy SMEs in Thailand. Structural equation modeling was used to test the model.

Findings

Results indicate that utilitarian benefits, and hedonic and eudaimonic happiness impact enhanced stakeholder–company relationship quality with the firm to varying degrees. Different levels of relationship quality also impact perceived corporate reputation and perceived brand equity differently.

Originality/value

This study is among the first that identifies the positive impact of happiness on corporate sustainability performance.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Sooksan Kantabutra

This study aims to measure the Thai approach of corporate sustainability. In the corporate world, the Thai philosophy of Sufficiency Economy can be applied to ensure…

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1578

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to measure the Thai approach of corporate sustainability. In the corporate world, the Thai philosophy of Sufficiency Economy can be applied to ensure corporate sustainability. Derived from the literature, a structural model expressing relationships between six independent variables of Sufficiency Economy indicators and three dependent variables of sustainability performance outcomes is formed accordingly, followed by hypotheses to be tested.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is tested through a random sample of 294 chief executive officers (CEOs) in Thailand who were asked to respond to a questionnaire. Factor and regression analyses are adopted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Findings indicate that “perseverance” and “resilience” are two direct predictors of three sustainability outcomes of the firm’s enhanced capacity to deliver strong performance, endure social and economic crises and deliver public benefits. “Geosocial development” is a direct predictor of firm’s enhanced capacity to deliver public benefits and an indirect predictor of firm’s enhanced capacity to deliver strong performance and to endure social and economic crises. “Moderation” is an indirect predictor of the firm’s capacity to endure social and economic crises, while “sharing” is an indirect predictor of all three sustainability performance outcomes.

Practical implications

Small- and medium-sized enterprises business leaders should develop a “perseverance” culture in their organizations and practice “resilience” to enhance their corporate sustainability prospect. Moreover, they should adopt “geosocial development”, “moderation” and “sharing” practices in their organizations, as these practices positively affect corporate sustainability performance directly or indirectly.

Originality/value

This study is among the first few studies that identify corporate sustainability performance predictors.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Sooksan Kantabutra

The purpose of this paper is to propose a behavioral theory of organizational vision.

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4805

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a behavioral theory of organizational vision.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on existing theoretical concepts and empirical evidence, this new theory development compares a diverse set of plausible logical, empirical, and/or epistemological conjectures so that highlighting occurs to form the substance of the new vision theory.

Findings

The approach takes the form of an emerging vision theory, which explains how vision attributes create an impact on organizational performance.

Originality/value

While vision is core to the prevailing vision‐based leadership theories, little is theoretically and empirically known about attributes for effective vision. Moreover, there is no existing leadership theory, which explains the process by which vision attributes create positive effects on organizational performance. The paper proposes a vision theory to fill this gap.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Sooksan Kantabutra and Molraudee Saratun

The purpose of this paper is to investigate vision‐based leadership effects on follower satisfaction in a Thai state enterprise.

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1093

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate vision‐based leadership effects on follower satisfaction in a Thai state enterprise.

Design/methodology/approach

Extending previous research, the present study examines relationships between vision realization factors and employee satisfaction. Derived from the literature, these vision realization factors are vision communication, motivation, and empowerment of employees. In total, five directional hypotheses are developed and tested accordingly through a series of regression analyses.

Findings

Findings indicate that vision communication, motivation, and empowerment of employees are directly predictive of enhanced employee satisfaction at the Thai state enterprise.

Practical implications

To enhance employee satisfaction, supervisors of all levels at the Thai state enterprise should focus on frequently communicating their vision to their direct subordinates, particularly through written and technology‐mediated channels. The supervisors should also delegate work to their subordinates, provide resources and support services to them, and encourage them to make more decisions regarding daily operations. The supervisors should additionally act as a role model for their subordinates, build subordinates' self‐confidence, create challenges for them, and reward subordinates who act consistently with their vision.

Originality/value

Although leaders are widely exhorted to espouse vision and vision‐based leadership was empirically endorsed in the Thai culture, vision‐based leadership and its effects have been little investigated in the Thai state enterprise sector. This paper contributes to this area.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Sooksan Kantabutra

Although leaders are widely believed to employ visions, little is known about what constitutes an “effective” vision, particularly in the higher education sector. This…

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2682

Abstract

Purpose

Although leaders are widely believed to employ visions, little is known about what constitutes an “effective” vision, particularly in the higher education sector. This paper seeks to proposes a research model for examining relationships between vision components and performance of higher education institutions, as measured by financial stability, student satisfaction and growth, process improvement, and learning and faculty satisfaction. The model proposes that vision attributes of brevity, clarity, abstractness, challenge, future orientation, stability, and desirability, and vision content relating to financial stability, student satisfaction and growth, process improvement, and learning and faculty satisfaction can affect performance through four vision realisation variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a critical review of existing theoretical concepts and empirical evidence, a new research model, as well as research hypotheses, are developed for future research.

Findings

With future empirical support, the model will help university and college administrators to effectively improve their institutional performance.

Originality/value

While vision is core to the prevailing vision‐based leadership theories, little is theoretically and empirically known about attributes for effective visions, particularly in the education sector. The paper proposes a model for future research to fill this gap.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Sooksan Kantabutra

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between vision attributes and content, and customer and staff satisfaction in Thai retail stores, taking into…

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2023

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships between vision attributes and content, and customer and staff satisfaction in Thai retail stores, taking into account vision realization factors of vision communication, organizational alignment, motivation of staff and empowerment of staff.

Design/methodology/approach

Variables of vision attributes and content, vision communication, organizational alignment, motivation of staff and empowerment of staff were derived from the literature. Data were from store managers, staff and customers of 126 apparel stores in Bangkok. These variables were tested for significant relationships through regression analyses.

Findings

Vision attributes is an indirect predictor of improved staff and customer satisfaction. Visions containing images about leadership were positively correlated with customer satisfaction. Motivation of staff is the only direct predictor of enhanced staff satisfaction, while vision, empowerment of staff, organizational alignment, and vision communication are four indirect predictors of improved staff satisfaction. On the other hand, vision, vision communication, empowerment of staff, motivation of staff, and staff satisfaction are five indirect predictors of enhanced customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

Retail store managers should develop a store vision characterized by the vision attributes and containing reference to market leadership. They should communicate their vision, align organizational components with the vision and empower and motivate staff according to the vision.

Originality/value

While vision is core to vision‐based leadership theories, little is known about what characterizes an effective vision. This study explains this unknown.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Sooksan Kantabutra and Gayle Avery

Avery and Bergsteiner's updated set of 23 sustainable leadership practices derived from sustainable enterprises and five performance outcomes provides a framework to…

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1781

Abstract

Purpose

Avery and Bergsteiner's updated set of 23 sustainable leadership practices derived from sustainable enterprises and five performance outcomes provides a framework to examine the business practices of Thailand's largest conglomerate, Siam Cement Group (SCG). The aim of this paper is to build on and expand Kantabutra and Avery's study based on Avery.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis was conducted by grouping Avery and Bergsteiner's principles into six categories, namely taking a long‐term perspective, investing in people, adapting the organizational culture, being innovative, exhibiting social and environmental responsibility, and behaving ethically. Adopting a multi‐data collection approach, research teams supplemented case study data with non‐participant observations from visits to the conglomerate and its training sessions. Multiple stakeholders were interviewed in semi‐structured interviews. Documentation and information supplied by, or published about, the conglomerate was consulted.

Findings

All six sets of practices, which sharply contrast with the prevailing business model of short‐term maximization of profitability but are consistent with the 23 sustainable leadership practices, were found to apply in varying degrees to SCG. A total of 19 applied strongly, with three others moderately strong.

Practical implications

Given that sustainable leadership principles are associated with enhanced brand and reputation, customer and staff satisfaction, and financial performance, the new Sustainable Leadership Grid provides corporate leaders with a useful checklist for this purpose.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the first examination of Avery and Bergsteiner's 23 sustainable leadership elements in a developing economy. It shows that even a publicly‐listed company can resist pressures to conform to business‐as‐usual practices and adopt the long‐term, socially responsible principles of “honeybee” sustainable leadership.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Sooksan Kantabutra and Parisa Rungruang

This paper aims to examine relationships between vision realization factors (vision communication, motivation and empowerment of employees), employee satisfaction, and…

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1411

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine relationships between vision realization factors (vision communication, motivation and empowerment of employees), employee satisfaction, and affective organizational commitment in a state‐owned energy provider in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

Subjects are drawn randomly from employees working at the Thai state‐owned energy provider who completed a questionnaire made up of valid and reliable instruments that measure each of the variables studied. Hypotheses are tested through a series of regression analyses.

Findings

Findings indicate that vision communication, motivation and empowerment of employees, and follower affective organizational commitment are three direct predictors of enhanced employee satisfaction. Empowerment of employees and employee satisfaction are two direct predictors of employee affective organizational commitment. These findings indicate a reciprocal relationship between employee satisfaction and affective organizational commitment, with a stronger effect from employee satisfaction on affective organizational commitment than the reverse.

Research limitations/implications

How supervisors empower and motivate their subordinates in the Thai state‐owned energy provider still needs a further investigation. The relationship between employee satisfaction and affective organizational commitment needs to be re‐examined by future research, using a different research design and statistical technique.

Practical implications

Leaders at all levels of the state‐owned energy provider should frequently communicate their vision to, motivate and empower their subordinates to enhance subordinate satisfaction and affective commitment.

Originality/value

The body of knowledge about vision‐based leadership in an Asian state‐owned energy provider is scanty. The present study contributes to this area.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2007

Sooksan Kantabutra and Gayle C. Avery

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to examine the relationships between vision attributes (of brevity, clarity, challenge, stability, abstractness, future…

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4936

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this article is to examine the relationships between vision attributes (of brevity, clarity, challenge, stability, abstractness, future orientation, and desirability or ability to inspire) and content (relating to customer and staff satisfaction imageries), and customer and staff satisfaction in Australian retail stores, taking into account vision realisation factors of vision communication, organisational alignment, motivation, empowerment and a staff personal factor comprised of staff emotional commitment to and use of the vision. Design/methodology/approach – Variables of vision attributes and content, vision communication, organisational alignment, motivation, empowerment and staff personal factor were derived from the literature. Data were from store managers, staff and customers of 101 apparel stores in Sydney. These variables were tested for significant relationships through chi‐square and regression analyses. Findings – Findings endorse the importance of espousing a vision containing reference to customer and staff satisfaction, although the seven attributes variable was not significant in this study. Empowerment of staff and staff personal factor were directly predictive of enhanced customer satisfaction, while motivation and empowerment of staff, and staff personal factor were directly predictive of enhanced staff satisfaction. Practical implications – Retail store managers should develop a store vision containing reference to customer and staff satisfaction. They should communicate their vision, align organisational components with the vision, empower and motivate staff. Staff should also use the vision to guide their work and emotionally commit to the vision. Original/value – While vision is core to vision‐based leadership theories, little is known about what characterises an effective vision. This study attempts to uncover this unknown.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Sooksan Kantabutra and Gayle C. Avery

The purpose of the paper is to identify characteristics of visions that are associated with desirable performance outcomes.

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12653

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to identify characteristics of visions that are associated with desirable performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines findings from various vision studies in American, Australian and Thai businesses to derive characteristics of effective vision statements.

Findings

Effective visions are characterized by conciseness, clarity, abstractness, stability, future orientation, challenge and desirability or ability to inspire in Australian, Thai and US businesses. Such visions are associated with higher performance outcomes.Originality/valueWhile vision is emphasized by authors and consultants as critical to superior performance, little is known about what characterizes effective vision. This study uncovers this unknown.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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