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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Jadranka Lasić‐Lazić, Mihaela Banek Zorica and Sonja Špiranec

This paper seeks to discuss the need for development and conceptualization of the learning outcomes and competences approach in creating information science curricula.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the need for development and conceptualization of the learning outcomes and competences approach in creating information science curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

An analytical approach to the theoretical insights and the results of previous and current empirical research projects was taken together with the detailed analysis of the Department of Information Sciences, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb program in order to prove the necessity of the educational approach based on competences and learning outcomes.

Findings

Learning outcomes should be the ultimate goal to be achieved by the teaching staff and students through the educational process. It is necessary that the learning outcomes approach along with the necessity for specific outcomes and competences should be determined by the university teachers on a conceptual as well as an implemental level. Competences that information sciences students are expected to attain (defined by the criterion of employability) have been determined in a way which should facilitate their later employment and enable them to compete in the labour market. At the same time, this kind of approach contributes to the preservation as well as to the prestige of the profession/discipline.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new approach to LIS curriculum through defining a framework of competencies based on learning outcomes.

Details

Library Management, vol. 32 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Sonja Spiranec, Mihaela Banek Zorica and Denis Kos

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the theoretical and pragmatic positioning of critical information literacy by interpreting it in the light of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the theoretical and pragmatic positioning of critical information literacy by interpreting it in the light of epistemological shifts brought about by Web 2.0. Epistemological shifts are elaborated from educational and institutional perspectives as well as from that of scientific research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper brings a theoretical analysis drawing on relevant literature for the purpose of identifying the grounds for the mapping of concepts associated with critical information literacy and participatory information environments. Based on descriptive analysis, the paper clarifies distinctions between/participatory/and /information bank/environments and identifies correlations existing between CIL and participatory information environments.

Findings

There are conceptual disagreements between IL as it was defined and perceived by Zurkowski and how it has to be perceived in the context of contemporary participatory information environments. Current environments are congruent with the core principles and values of critical information literacy and call for the reshaping of IL by introducing into it critical and transformative elements. Not technological aspects of Web 2.0 are crucial in this regard, but epistemological shifts.

Practical implications

Owing to the fact that Web 2.0 and critical information literacy share many similar features, information environments based on participatory technologies and services provide a context ideally suited for the application of the principles of CIL.

Social implications

The paper highlights the correlating dimensions between Web 2.0 and critical information literacy and proposes that Web 2.0 makes necessary a more critical outlook on information literacy.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the correlating dimensions between Web 2.0 and critical information literacy, indicates specific differences between information literacy and critical information literacy and closes with the conclusion that Web 2.0 makes necessary a more critical outlook on information literacy.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Sonja Špiranec and Mihaela Banek Zorica

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term Information Literacy 2.0 as a subset of information literacy, to describe its development and significance and give an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term Information Literacy 2.0 as a subset of information literacy, to describe its development and significance and give an outline of its underlying theoretical assumptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first examines the grounds for the possible re‐conceptualizations in the field of information literacy and identifies the current developments in the information universe as the principal drive for perception shifts. Based on a literature review and a descriptive analysis of contrasting features of library user education, information literacy and Information literacy 2.0, the paper highlights the main foci of paradigm shifts.

Findings

The paper found that the new meaning and understanding of the central conceptions in information literacy are shifting the focus of classical information literacy towards Information literacy 2.0. Many of the aspects of current information literacy practices originate from a print‐based culture, which is incongruent with the transient and hybrid nature of digital environments. These radically changing environments are causing the appearance of anomalies in the information literacy paradigm, which could effectively be resolved through the introduction of a sub‐concept of information literacy.

Practical implications

The article specifies the possibilities for putting theoretical conceptualizations of Information literacy 2.0 into practice by determining the range of shifts in information literacy activities and identifying how new practices differ from the earlier approaches.

Originality/value

The study attempts to advance the research field of information literacy by proposing a new outlook on information literacy through the integration of its underlying theoretical conceptions and practical applications.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 66 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Abstract

Details

New Library World, vol. 106 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Raj Kumar Bhardwaj

This paper aims to map information literacy literature in social sciences and humanities published during the period of 2001-2012.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to map information literacy literature in social sciences and humanities published during the period of 2001-2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the study are obtained from Scopus, accessible at www.scopus.com. Study used the Transformative Activity Index (TAI) and relative citation impact (RCI) to know the impact of most productive countries and prolific institutions. The SCImago Journal and Country Rank accessible at www.scimagojr.com/ was used to determine the SCImago Journal Rank and source normalized impact per paper.

Findings

The study found that 1990 documents originating from 79 countries were published in this study area. These papers are published in 160 journals with an average ∼12.51 papers per journal. These papers have been cited 10,025 times with ∼5.0. average citations per publication. Study also found that information literacy literature is published in 16 languages and the majority of the papers are in English, 1,879 (94.4 per cent). The highest growth of publications (106.7 per cent) was found in 2005. The USA contributed the highest number, 1,035 (52 per cent) papers. Moreover, of the 15 most productive countries, three recorded TAIs >100, and 12 countries recorded TAIs <100. In all, 160 institutions worldwide have contributed in information literacy research. Study also found that maximum literature published on the subject by a single author is 828 (41.6 per cent). Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain has produced the highest number of papers (24, or 1.2 per cent) and received 61 (0.6 per cent) citations, while University of Strathclyde has the highest RCI (∼2.7) for its publications. Pintos, María from Universidad de Granada has published the maximum number of papers (18) that have been cited 78 times.

Social implications

The study endeavors to showcase information literacy research outcomes in social sciences and humanities. It involves quantitative analysis of the literature in this domain using bibliographic elements such as keywords, authors, affiliation, publication and citations.

Originality/value

No study has been conducted so far to map the information literacy literature in social sciences and humanities. Study will be useful in understanding the progress on information literacy in the area of social sciences and humanities. The study is significant for social scientists to foster further research in this emerging area.

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