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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2015

Stacey Kerr, Mardi Schmeichel and Sonia Janis

Teacher educators are expected to create experiences for pre-service teachers to prepare them for the world of teaching and the ever-changing contexts of schools and teaching. In…

Abstract

Teacher educators are expected to create experiences for pre-service teachers to prepare them for the world of teaching and the ever-changing contexts of schools and teaching. In this article, we discussed integrating two different aspects of teacher education—field-based instruction and technology—through the use of Evernote®, a digital note-taking and archiving application, to create digital interactive student notebooks. Our goal was to provide other practitioners with insight into our use of Evernote® to address two different pedagogical goals of a field-based course: 1) to enrich our pedagogies through the use of a digital interactive notebook with pre-service teachers who were spending more time in Pre-Kindergarten-12 social studies classrooms, and 2) to teach pre-service teachers to use a particular cloud-based technology that could be implemented in their future classrooms. We described Evernote®, how we used it to work against the notorious theory and practice gap in teacher preparation, and discussed the importance of taking the time in teacher education to teach technology to digital natives.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2024

Erica Gilbertson, Amy Murphy, Sonia Janis, Kathy Thompson and Michael Harris

The purpose of this action research study was to design, implement and evaluate interventions that enhanced the induction program for new teachers in a P-12 school district. At…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this action research study was to design, implement and evaluate interventions that enhanced the induction program for new teachers in a P-12 school district. At the outset, we hoped the study would provide new teacher support resulting in improved teaching practices, increased job satisfaction and/or increased teacher retention among the target population. With this in mind, our research question was: What structures and supports from a school-university partnership facilitate capacity-building among university teacher education faculty, school and district leaders, mentor teachers, and new teachers in the context of an induction program?

Design/methodology/approach

This study used an intervention-centered mode of action research methodology that aims to make systems-level change. This type of action research intends to solve real organizational problems with a focus on conducting “research in action” rather than “research about action” (Coghlan and Brannick, 2014, pp. 5–6). This approach necessitates that data collection and analysis are iterative processes, occurring throughout the research process, instead of solely at the end stages of the research process. Our action research process used Coghlan and Brannick’s (2014) action research cycle model. The cyclical four-step process includes constructing (verifying the problem in the local context), planning action, taking action and evaluating action. Facilitated by the interim director of a Professional development schools (PDS) partnership in the Southeastern United States, a team of co-researchers which included three university teacher education faculty and four school district administrators used action research methodology to create systemic change that enhanced the district’s induction program. We collected data through multiple qualitative methods, including surveys, focus groups, observations and interviews during the course of three action research cycles. These data and our theoretical framework (complex adaptive systems theory and social network theory) informed two major interventions that supported new teachers during the challenging first year of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic.

Findings

The interventions and the research process were mutually beneficial for both institutions and contributed to professional learning and growth at the individual, group and system levels. The three major findings described include: (1) engaging in collaborative action research is mutually beneficial for both schools and universities; (2) induction programs benefit from university resources; (3) learning communities build all educators’ professional capacity.

Research limitations/implications

Our research recommendations are: (1) more research is needed on the benefits of school-university partnerships to induction programs; (2) school-university partnerships should leverage action research to improve systems; (3) within school-university partnerships, the connection between collaborative leadership and sustainability requires further research. One limitation was that this study was conducted in a single school-university partnership context involving a large public university and a mid-sized public school district that had a well-established partnership. More induction-centered research is needed in different types of school-university partnership contexts that have varying levels of longevity and partnership structures.

Practical implications

Our recommendations for practice include (1) school-university partnerships should leverage collaborative learning communities to catalyze individual, group and systems-level learning and change, and (2) school-university partnerships must prioritize induction support to strengthen the teaching profession.

Originality/value

Since Hunt’s (2014) literature review on induction support in PDS partnerships, very few empirical studies have been conducted in this research area. This study, which examined induction support in a PDS partnership over a two-year period, makes a significant contribution to the scholarly literature on induction teacher support in school-university partnership contexts. Facilitated by the interim director of a PDS partnership, a team of co-researchers, which included three university teacher education faculty and four school district administrators, used action research methodology to create systems-level supports that enhanced the district’s induction program.

Details

School-University Partnerships, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-7125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2011

Kay A. Chick

This article features the achievements of women through four picture book biographies, all of which are National Council for the Social Studies Notable Trade Books for 2011. These…

Abstract

This article features the achievements of women through four picture book biographies, all of which are National Council for the Social Studies Notable Trade Books for 2011. These notable trade book selections underscore the contributions of four distinct ethnicities, symbolizing the cultural diversity of our nation and its citizens. They draw attention to women who accomplished great things, yet remain unknown and invisible in the historical record. The contributions of these women are highlighted, and developmentally appropriate extension activities are shared to help teachers encourage children to learn more about the lives of women who changed our nation not only during Women’s History Month, but throughout the year. Finally, this article discusses tips for engaging both girls and boys in the study of women’s history.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Ruth Penfold-Mounce

Abstract

Details

Death, The Dead and Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-053-2

Article
Publication date: 21 May 2010

Kumiko Osajima, Brenda Sternquist and Sonia Manjeshwar

Japanese materialistic behavior and consumption trends are examined by comparing age‐cohort differences between the Japanese “new breed” and “second baby‐boomer age‐cohorts”…

Abstract

Japanese materialistic behavior and consumption trends are examined by comparing age‐cohort differences between the Japanese “new breed” and “second baby‐boomer age‐cohorts”. Price perception, brand loyalty, and shopping‐information sources of the two age‐cohorts are also assessed. Results suggest that the Japanese new breed is more materialistic, sensitive to prestige, brand loyal, and likely to use media as their shopping information source as compared to second baby‐boomer. On the other hand, second baby‐boomers are less materialistic, value conscious, less brand loyal, and more likely to rely on word‐of‐mouth communication as their information sources as compared to the Japanese new breeds.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Natalia Kucirkova

Abstract

Details

The Future of the Self: Understanding Personalization in Childhood and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-945-0

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Bikram Jit Singh Mann and Sonia Babbar

Before introducing new products, companies make announcements regarding the launch of the product which influences stock market yields of the announcing companies. Information…

Abstract

Purpose

Before introducing new products, companies make announcements regarding the launch of the product which influences stock market yields of the announcing companies. Information content of the new product announcement has never been an exclusive focused stream of research. Therefore, an assessment of the impact of the content characteristics of the new product announcement on the shareholder value and the impact of source credibility (spokesperson) in making such announcements is a major gap in the existing literature. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the standard event study methodology has been employed on the sample to measure the abnormal gains/losses accruing to the announcing firms. Second, moderated regression analysis (MRA) is employed to identify the characteristics of the new product announcement and to check the role of the spokesperson in creating shareholder value.

Findings

The results of the event study indicate that the abnormal returns are generated during the new product announcement. The results of MRA disclose the variables having a positive and a significant influence on the effective returns of the announcing companies. Likewise, the role of the spokesperson has come out brightly as a credible communicator.

Originality/value

The research provides a direction to the announcing companies regarding the content of the announcement leading to a positive perception among the investing community. Likewise, it also provides direction to the investor community about the characteristics of the announcement content they give weight age in forming a perception of strength in evaluating the new product announcement, to which they are largely unaware.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of…

16454

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2021

Giada Mainolfi, Vittoria Marino and Riccardo Resciniti

The present study investigates the impact of perceived enjoyment, blogger credibility and homophily on readers' engagement. Moreover, the study investigates the role exerted by…

2129

Abstract

Purpose

The present study investigates the impact of perceived enjoyment, blogger credibility and homophily on readers' engagement. Moreover, the study investigates the role exerted by blog engagement on intentions to follow blogger's recommendations. Despite the growing relevance of these issues, past studies have neglected the relevance of a joint analysis of such dimensions within the context of food blogs.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical research builds on an online survey with a sample of 821 blog readers (353 Italian and 468 American). The proposed model was tested through structural equation modelling.

Findings

Results from a survey on Italian and American consumers show that perceived enjoyment and homophily have a significant effect on blog engagement, which, in turn, positively influences both intention to taste and visit. Moreover, blogger credibility does not show a significant influence on blog engagement for Italian and American followers.

Originality/value

The study contributes to a better understanding of the influence exerted by blog engagement on intention to follow blogger's recommendations. The study also examines perceived enjoyment, credibility and homophily as antecedents of engagement, which have not been extensively researched in the past with respect to food blogs.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Hamid Keshavarz

Social media pose serious challenges to information evaluation, which can make credibility evaluation more difficult compared to other information resources. As a result, this…

1919

Abstract

Purpose

Social media pose serious challenges to information evaluation, which can make credibility evaluation more difficult compared to other information resources. As a result, this paper aims to explore related challenges and research directions to put forth a set of criteria practical for actual users in their decision-making.

Design/methodology/approach

Related literature in such disciplines as information, communication and media sciences were carefully searched and assessed. Once challenges and research directions were identified, a literature coding approach was considered to design a conceptual framework incorporating the main criteria used for evaluating information found from social media.

Findings

Some areas of consideration such as political concerns, health information, organizational issues and purchasing behavior are among the main challenges inevitable in evaluating current social media information. The relative importance of credibility criteria varies from study to study depending on factors such as the characteristics of the participants, the type of the source and the type of information.

Practical implications

A conceptual framework developed including four main dimensions of the information source, information presentation, information credibility and decision-related issues as a set of criteria useful for the decision-making of social media users when evaluating information.

Originality/value

The literature review and the conceptual framework incorporate a set of most important criteria for exploring the credibility evaluation of social media information, which are also useful for future related studies.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

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