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Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Wai-Chung Ho and Wing-Wah Law

The purpose of this paper is to examine music teachers' perceptions of teaching cultural and national values (also defined as national cultural values) to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine music teachers' perceptions of teaching cultural and national values (also defined as national cultural values) to explore the tensions facing school music education in the choice of music types to be delivered in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

With specific regard to music teachers' perceptions of “values,” “music cultures” and “nationalism,” data were drawn from a survey questionnaire given to 343 music teachers (155 preservice and 188 in-service music teachers) and semistructured interviews with 36 of these respondents.

Findings

The findings of the study showed that though many respondents in Hong Kong and Taiwan felt comfortable teaching traditional Chinese music, they did not want to teach contemporary Mainland Chinese music and other political or patriotic forms in the school music curriculum. The data also demonstrated some shortcomings in introducing a balance of music types into the curriculum, as well as limitations in promoting national education in response to the respective sociopolitical situations in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Research limitations/implications

This study was subject to limitations regarding the potential generalizability of the findings on school music teachers' perceptions in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

Practical implications

The implications for teachers and student teachers regarding the development of cultural and national values related to the political processes in Hong Kong and Taiwan are complicated, because of not only their relationship with Mainland China and its education based on nationalism but also the extent of teachers' professional training to help create an enabling environment for national and cultural development.

Originality/value

The findings of this study revealed that there are fundamental gaps in the overt and operational curricula in Hong Kong and Taiwan concerning the sociopolitical function of values in school music education in response to their respective sociopolitical situations.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Charles Kirke

The purpose of this paper is to present an insider ethnographic account of a series of social confrontations between two mutually opposed groups of officers that took…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an insider ethnographic account of a series of social confrontations between two mutually opposed groups of officers that took place in an officers’ mess in a remote military garrison in the 1980s. The identity of one of these groups was expressed in a particular song that was sung frequently and noisily in the mess. The analysis of these incidents and their precursors provides an understanding of the social processes in which they were embedded, and the conclusions drawn are generalized into the wider context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on insider ethnography, using rich description to present the incidents and their background. Analysis is conducted using other research by the author on the organizational culture of Service officers and wider scholarship not specifically related to the Military.

Findings

The paper finds that in-groups and out-groups in joint Service populations do not necessarily run along traditional, Service, lines, and that cultural change in the groups concerned was associated with the rapid turnover of their members as they were replaced in the normal postings cycle. It demonstrates that a socially powerful shared cultural element can, if only temporarily, bring unity between rival groups. It also contributes to the scholarship on the power of song as a proclamation of group identity and the intensification of that identity.

Originality/value

The main strength of this paper is that it provides an insider’s view of a British military social group, which is extremely rare in the literature, describing social processes that connect to the wider scholarship on song, in-group and out-group behaviour, and cultural change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Abstract

Details

Grassroots Leadership and the Arts for Social Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-687-1

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2010

Abstract

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Case study
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Alexandra Spiliakos and Shubhalaxmi Taywade

This case study is intended for an MBA level audience; however, it can be used for upper-level college students as well.

Abstract

Study Level/Applicability

This case study is intended for an MBA level audience; however, it can be used for upper-level college students as well.

Subject Area

This case's main subject areas include the following: organizational strategy, NGO strategic management, strategy and management during pandemic and women entrepreneurs or women-led business.

Case Overview

This case is about the organizational strategy of the Veronica Robles Cultural Center, an NGO, during the COVID-19 pandemic. The central challenge of this case study is about decision-making for a sustainable future, given limited resources, and thus a great urgency to plan conservatively. The central protagonist of the case is Veronica Robles herself. Veronica is an entrepreneur in both her personal career as a performing and teaching artist as well as the founder and creator of many programs to help spread culture and unite communities, including the Veronica Robles Cultural Center.

Expected learning outcomes

Students will learn about entrepreneurial strategy, NGO creation and management, strategy to create social value and organizational management during time of pandemic or widespread crisis.

Social Implications

This case is focused on creating social value through the analysis of a woman-founded and managed NGO. While managing the NGO's strategy through the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020, operations must proceed with the utmost level of sustainability. With a focus on the well-being of the community, Veronica Robles Cultural Center (VROCC) needs to find a way to remain relevant in the short term while building out a sustainable organizational structure to succeed in the long term.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy

Supplementary Materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2732-4443

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 16 August 2014

Holly Raima Hippolite and Toni Bruce

Purpose – This chapter investigates how being Māori influences the sport experiences of Māori participants, and offers a critical Māori perspective on mainstream New…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter investigates how being Māori influences the sport experiences of Māori participants, and offers a critical Māori perspective on mainstream New Zealand sport. It argues for the value of moving towards a culturally competent approach that embraces, rather than resists, Māori tikanga and practices.

Design/methodology/approach – The research is driven by an Indigenous kaupapa Māori research methodology that privileges research by Māori, about Māori, being Māori. Ten highly experienced Māori participants were interviewed. The cultural competence continuum was employed to assess New Zealand sport’s ability to meet the needs of its indigenous peoples.

Findings – For the Māori participants, mainstream sport reflects the echoes of colonial ways of thinking that frequently ignore or devalue Māori values or interpret assertions of self-determination as separatist and divisive. Using examples from the participants’ experiences, we argue that cultural competence is something that could benefit all in New Zealand sport.

Research limitations/implications – The limitations of a small sample are addressed by triangulating the participants’ perspectives with other sources of information about Maori sporting experience.

Originality/value – The chapter privileges a Māori critique of existing structures and suggests a way forward that could positively influence sport delivery for Māori and people of all ethnicities.

Details

Native Games: Indigenous Peoples and Sports in the Post-Colonial World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-592-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1910

GLASGOW was later by about one hundred and thirty years than some of the Scotch towns in establishing a printing press. Three hundred years ago, though Glasgow contained a…

Abstract

GLASGOW was later by about one hundred and thirty years than some of the Scotch towns in establishing a printing press. Three hundred years ago, though Glasgow contained a University with men of great literary activity, including amongst others Zachary Boyd, there does not appear to have been sufficient printing work to induce anyone to establish a printing press. St. Andrews and Aberdeen were both notable for the books they produced, before Glasgow even attempted any printing.

Details

New Library World, vol. 12 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2010

Joanna Pascoe

This case study examined the effects of an enriched environmental language‐accessing programme on an individual with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using a…

Abstract

This case study examined the effects of an enriched environmental language‐accessing programme on an individual with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using a holistic programme ‐ which involved greetings, singing songs, drawing, painting, word focus, poetry, story retelling, pictorial cards and farewells ‐ the rehabilitation set out to improve the participant's ability to access dormant language. The researcher chose familiar songs, stories and subject areas of interest to the participant.The language programme's daily half‐hour sessions were held for four weeks at a time, with a different theme for each week. Activities were chosen to link into the week's theme. After a two‐week break, the language programme was repeated for consolidation.Data was documented using video, transcription and word‐list collation. These word lists showed which language was accessed without help, with initial prompts and through repetition. Data was analysed by comparing sessions at time one and time two, using the McNemar test for significance of changes for repeated measures. For various sessions the findings showed significant improvements in language production from time one to time two. Compared to the participant's limited language production outside of the programme, the results showed how the participant's speech increased as a result of the rehabilitation.The implications of this case study suggest that a holistic language rehabilitation programme involving an empathetic interlocutor who encourages communication through music, story, familiar topics and art is beneficial to a participant with a severe TBI. Further research repeating the language programme with similar participants would help to generalise these findings.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2019

Marek Jeziński

In this chapter, I discuss the artistic representation of the musical illustration of funeral rites and ceremonies in contemporary Poland. The death of a person in many…

Abstract

In this chapter, I discuss the artistic representation of the musical illustration of funeral rites and ceremonies in contemporary Poland. The death of a person in many cultures is perceived as an important point in the life of a given community, especially a family; hence, people tend to express feelings stemming from these circumstances through art. Songs sung at funerals and during the mourning period have been used for centuries as a way for the living to express their grief for the person who has died. From an anthropological point of view, the main function of music accompanying funeral rites is to help family and friends of the deceased recover from their loss.

To illustrate my argument, I analyse the recording of folk songs by Adam Strug and Kwadrofonik: ‘Requiem Ludowe’ (‘The Folk Requiem’), released on CD in 2013. The musical motifs and lyrical themes are based on original folk tunes of Eastern Poland (Podlasie and Lubelszczyzna regions) that are still used in the villages during the bereavement period. The songs on the CD, which are: ‘Czemu tak rychło, Panie’ (‘Why is it So Soon, my Lord’); ‘Żegnam cię mój świecie wesoły’ (‘Goodbye my Merry World’); ‘Żegnam was mitry i korony’ (‘Goodbye to you Mithra and Crowns’); ‘Żegnam was wszystkie elementa’ (‘Goodbye to you all the Elements’); ‘Powiem prawdę świecie tobie’ (‘I Shall Tell you the Truth, my World’); ‘Piekło’ (‘The Hell’); ‘Czyściec’ (‘The Purgatory’); ‘Niebo’ (‘The Heaven’); and ‘Wieczność’ (‘The Eternity’) are rooted in Christian funeral traditions and they are supplemented by elements of Slavic folklore.

The lyrics of the mourning songs published on the recording display a specific attitude to the mythology of death and bereavement present in the culture of Polish peasants. The main themes of these folk songs, namely, the praise of the deceased, the grief of the remaining family, the preparation of the dead one for eternal life or the attempts to cross the threshold of life and death, are presented by the artists as the soul’s journey from the Earth to the Underworld, and through Purgatory to Eternal life as a final stage of a person’s destination. They show how the rural people imagine death itself and express their feelings of loss and grief in art to overcome the fear of the unknown.

Details

Music and Death: Interdisciplinary Readings and Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-945-3

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Ya-ning Kao

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of Zhuang shamanic narrative songs at three festivals to explore how and why a narrative song genre that originated…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the performance of Zhuang shamanic narrative songs at three festivals to explore how and why a narrative song genre that originated with Zhuang shamans is separated from shamanic ritual contexts and re-contextualized at festivals under the cultural policies instigated by the People’s Republic of China in the post-socialist era.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a review of publications on Zhuang performance art and fieldwork data collected in southwestern Guangxi, China.

Findings

The de-construction of Zhuang shamanic narrative song melodies dates back to the late nineteenth century, when southwestern Guangxi literati used the melodies to compose popular songs. By the 1950s, the religious elements of these narrative songs had already been obfuscated, leading Chinese scholars to select them as representative of Zhuang performance arts. Since the enactment of China’s Intangible Culture Heritage (ICH) Law in the early twenty-first century, local Zhuang elites have re-constructed and re-introduced shamanic elements to narrative songs as they are performed at festivals as a means to further highlight the ethnic characteristics of the Zhuang people.

Originality/value

The paper provides detailed documentation of three cases of the restoration of shamanic elements to narrative songs sung by the Zhuang people. However, the research is limited to one community, inviting comparison with other cases, both inside and outside China, of how ICH policies impact grass-roots cultural practices.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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