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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

James T.C. Teng and Seokwoo Song

Knowledge sharing (KS) has been a central concern in knowledge management (KM) practice and research. However, KS has remained largely a simplistic concept. This study

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge sharing (KS) has been a central concern in knowledge management (KM) practice and research. However, KS has remained largely a simplistic concept. This study aims to differentiate between solicited KS and voluntary KS and also to attempt to examine the role of both types of KS in relation to task, culture, technology and KM processes at the work unit level.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey method was used. The questionnaire was issued to MBA students enrolled in a major southern university's cohort‐based program for working professionals, and a total of 149 usable responses were collected.

Findings

It was found that task routineness and open communication facilitate only solicited sharing behaviors, while perception of solidarity is significantly related to voluntary sharing behaviors. In addition, knowledge tools and tacit‐oriented KM processes were found to play a significant role in both voluntary and solicited KS.

Research limitations/implications

Exploratory analysis points to differentiated influence of these environmental conditions on the two KS types, suggesting further implications for research and practice. With the realization that voluntary sharing is a more proactive form of KS, KM practitioners may find it beneficial to monitor different forms of KS.

Originality/value

While KS has been the focus of intensive research in recent years, the concept itself has remained surprisingly simplistic among researchers. This study differentiates between two forms of KS: solicited KS and voluntary KS.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2019

Yu-Jen Hsiao, Lei Qin and Yueh-Lung Lin

This chapter differentiates the effect of solicited credit ratings (SCRs) and unsolicited credit ratings (UCRs) on bank leverage decision before and after the credit…

Abstract

This chapter differentiates the effect of solicited credit ratings (SCRs) and unsolicited credit ratings (UCRs) on bank leverage decision before and after the credit rating change. We find that banks with UCRs issue less debt relative to equity when the credit rating changes are approaching. Such findings are also prominent when bank credit rating moves from investment grade to speculative grade. After credit rating upgrades (downgrades), banks with unsolicited (solicited) credit ratings are inclined to issue more (less) debt relative to equity than those with solicited (unsolicited) credit ratings. We conclude that SCR and UCR changes lead to significantly different effects on bank leverage decision.

Details

Advances in Pacific Basin Business, Economics and Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-285-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Robert N Sobol

A pooled income fund (PIF) is one of the methods created under the 1969 Tax Reform Act whereby a taxpayer may make a tax‐deductible remainder gift to a charitable…

Abstract

A pooled income fund (PIF) is one of the methods created under the 1969 Tax Reform Act whereby a taxpayer may make a tax‐deductible remainder gift to a charitable organization. The fund, established by a charitable organization to receive irrevocable gifts from at least two donors, pays current income to the individual beneficiaries for life, but at the termination of each income interest, the allocable principal must revert permanently to the charitable organization. In recent years, a number of PIFs have been offered to the public by charitable organizations through broker‐dealers or related entities. There are numerous securities‐law issues implicated by the sales of these PIFs, including: (i) whether broker‐dealers may solicit donations to such funds and receive compensation for their solicitations; (ii) the effect of the broker‐dealers’ solicitation and receipt of compensation have on securities registration for the PIF or units offered therein under the Securities Act of 1933, the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or the Investment Company Act of 1940; (iii) whether staff and persons affiliated with the sponsoring charity, including parties assisting them in the marketing of such pooled income funds, also should be permitted to solicit donations; (iv) whether such charities or persons, or parties assisting them in the marketing of such pooled income funds, then should be required to register as broker‐dealers; (v) what securities licenses may be required of the aforementioned parties; and (vi) whether there are ways to design the manner in which third parties other than broker dealers are compensated to resolve any potential issues arising from answers to the previous questions. This article first sets forth the applicable law involved in the analysis and then attempts to answer each of the issues presented above.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Mattias Elg, Lars Witell, Bozena Poksinska, Jon Engström, Su Mi Dahlgaard‐Park and Peter Kammerlind

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of how patients experience their health problems and how they can generate innovative ideas about health care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an understanding of how patients experience their health problems and how they can generate innovative ideas about health care services. The research questions that guide the present study are: how can solicited diaries be used for capturing patient ideas? What type of data is generated from solicited diaries used for generating patient ideas? And what are the potential benefits and shortcomings of using patient diaries in generating ideas for improvement of health care services?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an exploratory case study using patient diaries to solicit ideas about how health care services in Sweden can be improved. From the methodological viewpoint, the diaries are used as a tool for patient co‐creation of health care services.

Findings

When analyzing dairies written by patients four different types of diaries emerged from the study: brief, reporting, descriptive and reflective diaries. Furthermore, 102 ideas for improvements within nine areas were identified from the contents of dairies.

Research limitations/implications

Adopting patients' diaries as a way to activate and promote co‐creation of values is at an embryo stage, and hence more research is needed.

Originality/value

One of the strengths of the paper includes its potential for practical implications, either clinical or methodological, by using patients' dairies. It focuses both on the content generated from the diaries for improving health services, as well as the use of the diaries for practicing the idea of patients as co‐creators in health care service.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Shih Yung Chou and Joseph M. Stauffer

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new classification of helping behavior using the recipient’s solicitation and the helper’s proactiveness. Additionally, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a new classification of helping behavior using the recipient’s solicitation and the helper’s proactiveness. Additionally, the authors explore helping motives for each of the forms of helping behavior that the authors identify.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined relevant research and performed a theoretical analysis.

Findings

The authors classified helping behavior into three distinct forms, including unsolicited proactive helping behavior, unsolicited reactive helping behavior, and solicited reactive helping behavior. Additionally, the authors claimed that unsolicited proactive helping behavior is an outcome of personality and dispositions, that unsolicited reactive helping behavior is a process of social and instrumental exchange, and that solicited reactive helping behavior is a product of functional motives.

Practical implications

First, from the perspective of organizational justice, the authors recommend managers to take the form of helping behavior exhibited into consideration when evaluating employees’ helping behavior because certain forms of helping behavior require greater degrees of cooperation and sacrifices from the helper than other forms. Second, because employees who engage in high levels of unsolicited proactive helping behavior are likely to experience interrole conflict, the authors suggest that managers provide counseling and managerial support that help cope with emotional and psychological strain created by excessive role demands. Finally, findings of this study imply that managers need to create a workplace culture where employees can feel comfortable to solicit help when necessary.

Originality/value

This is the first study that classifies helping behavior and helping motives using both of the helper’s and recipient’s perspectives.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Carlos Rodríguez Casal

Commercial non‐solicited communications are a growing problem bringing calls for tighter anti‐Spam legislation. This paper compares the advantages and disadvantages of…

Abstract

Commercial non‐solicited communications are a growing problem bringing calls for tighter anti‐Spam legislation. This paper compares the advantages and disadvantages of opt‐in and opt‐out schemes. An opt‐in scheme would provide the best protection for citizens’ privacy and property. However, the fragmented way in which EU legislation is being implemented shows how the geographic limitations of the legislation may make opt‐in partially useless and harmful for competition. This paper therefore concludes that opt‐out with “public” international lists are the best compromise.

Details

info, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Peter Bamberger

Although employee helping behaviors have been widely examined by organizational and human resource management scholars, relatively little is known about the antecedents…

Abstract

Although employee helping behaviors have been widely examined by organizational and human resource management scholars, relatively little is known about the antecedents and consequences of help-seeking in the workplace. Seeking to fill this gap, I draw from the social and counseling psychology literatures, as well as from research in epidemiology and health sociology to first conceptualize the notion of employee help-seeking and then to identify the variables and mechanisms potentially driving such behavior in work organizations. My critical review of this literature suggests that the application of existing models of help-seeking may offer limited predictive utility when applied to the workplace unless help-seeking is conceived as the outcome of a multi-level process. That in mind, I propose a model of employee help-seeking that takes into account the potential direct and cross-level moderating effects of a variety of situational factors (e.g., the nature of the particular problem, organizational norms, support climate) that might have differential influences on help-seeking behavior depending on the particular phase of the help-seeking process examined. Following this, I focus on two sets of help-seeking outcomes, namely, the implications of employee help-seeking on individual and group performance, and the impact of help-seeking on employee well-being. The chapter concludes with a brief examination of some of the more critical issues in employee help-seeking that remain to be explored (e.g., the timing of help solicitation) as well as the methodological challenges likely to be faced by those seeking to engage in such exploration.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-056-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Johan Frishammar

This paper addresses the issue of information use in strategic decision making. The study employs a case study as a research strategy together with personal interviews and…

Abstract

This paper addresses the issue of information use in strategic decision making. The study employs a case study as a research strategy together with personal interviews and documentation as means of data collection. The starting‐point is four specific strategic decisions recently made by medium‐sized companies in Sweden. The study provides the reader with an insight into management information behaviour when taking strategic decisions, by addressing questions such as: Why is information used? What kind of information does management use? How do they obtain it? And finally, where do they obtain it? In addition, a short review of the literature pertaining to the above stated questions is provided.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2014

Audrey Laplante

The study examines how late adolescents use the resources embedded in their social network to obtain the information and support they need to do their homework. A…

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines how late adolescents use the resources embedded in their social network to obtain the information and support they need to do their homework. A particular attention is paid to how social network sites (SNSs) are used and perceived by late adolescents for academic help seeking.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study uses in-depth interviewing and critical incident technique. An egocentric approach to Social Network Analysis is also employed to examine the core social network of each participant.

Findings

Most adolescents had a solid personal social network but did not always fully take advantage of the resources embedded in it for schoolwork. Availability was the most important criteria for deciding who to approach. SNSs were often used to obtain the help they needed, although phone calls and in-person visits were considered more efficient in certain situations.

Research limitations/implications

This study draws on a small purposive sample that may limit generalization. This research contributes to our understanding of the resources late adolescents have access to within their core social network, the way they take advantage (or not) of these resources for schoolwork, and the role SNSs play in the process. Findings have implications for services that educators and school librarians should provide to support the educational needs of late adolescents.

Originality/value

This study contributes more generally to our understanding of late adolescents’ use of people as primary sources of information to complete school-related homework.

Details

New Directions in Children’s and Adolescents’ Information Behavior Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-814-3

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2020

Charlotte De Kock, Eva Blomme and Jérôme Antoine

Substance use treatment (SUT) among migrants and ethnic minorities is an underresearched domain in European countries, although preliminary studies point out disparities…

Abstract

Purpose

Substance use treatment (SUT) among migrants and ethnic minorities is an underresearched domain in European countries, although preliminary studies point out disparities in treatment use and access compared to general populations. This paper aims to identify the main characteristics of and the types of services solicited by non-nationals in Belgium.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper compares the types of SUT services used by Belgian and non-national clients. Second, the referral source for Belgian and non-national clients is considered. Third, the study compares the client characteristics of Belgian and non-national clients. This descriptive analysis is based on aggregated data sets in the European treatment demand indicator (TDI) registry including all Belgian treatment episodes between 2012 and 2014.

Findings

Non-national clients were more often located in outpatient SUT and were less often referred by general practitioners and hospitals, compared to Belgian clients. Third-country clients appear to have lower socioeconomic statuses (education, employment, housing) than Belgian clients. Non-national youngsters and third-country females appear to be underrepresented in Belgian SUT compared to their presence in the general population. The gender gap is larger among third-country clients than among Belgian clients.

Research limitations/implications

These associations between nationality and solicited services, gender, education, employment, housing and referral document treatment gaps among some non-nationals that require special attention in targeted treatment. In the European context, further research is needed on better monitoring migration background in the European TDI registries.

Practical implications

The overrepresentation of non-nationals in low-threshold opioid substitution treatment services and their underrepresentation in high-threshold residential services requires an in-depth analysis of the core goals of these respective services. Residential services, for instance, should consider how a dominant focus on speech therapy hampers access to treatment for these populations and how access for these populations could be enhanced by modifying or diversifying methods in treatment.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first paper that analyses the national indicator in a European TDI data set.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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