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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Erin C. Adams and Sohyun An

The purpose of this theoretical paper is to propose that museums can be useful sites in intervening the theory–practice divide in teacher education. The authors draw from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this theoretical paper is to propose that museums can be useful sites in intervening the theory–practice divide in teacher education. The authors draw from their visit to the Center for Civil and Human Rights (CCHR or Center hereafter) to explore the potential of a local museum as a powerful intervention in the preservice teacher education theory/practice divide.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ theoretical framework draws off of “thinking with theory,” a method of using concepts to make sense of data by “plugging” a concept “into” data (Jackson and Mazzei, 2011). The authors believe that everyone, even their preservice teachers think with theories in an attempt to make sense of information and events. In their social studies methods courses, the authors offer readings, texts, videos and experiences that present ideas and concepts that are new to their preservice teachers in order to expose underlying theories that frame worldviews.

Findings

The authors provide four “snapshots” or findings. These include: heroification and villainification, White–Black binary and messianic meta-narratives, empathy and simulation and critical Black patriotism. Each of these snapshots is grounded in theories from scholars in the field of social studies, demonstrating one way to put theory to work.

Originality/value

As the aforementioned snapshots show, the authors found a place like CCHR that can serve as important space to think with theory and deconstruct presented narratives. The authors “plugged” concepts from social studies scholarship “into” the narratives presented at the CCHR. Specifically, the authors used villainification (van Kessel and Crowley, 2017), AsianCrit (Chang, 1993), Black Patriotism (Busey and Walker, 2017) and messianic narratives and martyrdom (Alridge, 2006).

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Yoonjung Choi, Jae Hoon Lim and Sohyun An

This study explores how recent Korean immigrant students experience learning social studies and how their unique social, cultural, and educational backgrounds as new…

Abstract

This study explores how recent Korean immigrant students experience learning social studies and how their unique social, cultural, and educational backgrounds as new immigrants shape their experiences in American schools. Based on survey and in-depth interviews with 43 Korean immigrant students in two urban and three suburban/rural areas, this mixed methods study examines Korean immigrant youths’ perceptions about the nature of history and social studies as well as their experiences of learning social studies in their everyday classroom contexts. Our data analysis demonstrates that Korean immigrant students face varying difficulties in constructing meaning in US history and engaging themselves in social studies learning, which results in a negative learning experience and subsequent disinterest in social studies. Researchers identified three major challenges that Korean immigrant youths experience in their social studies classrooms: (1) Lack of English proficiency, background knowledge, and American patriotism, (2) White, American-centered perspectives and marginalization of their country of origin, and (3) Teachers’ lack of care and disengaging pedagogies. The findings of this study provide implications for creating more meaningful and culturally relevant social studies learning for immigrant students.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Sohyun An

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which an intervention lesson could help with elementary pre-service teachers’ critical racial knowledge around school…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which an intervention lesson could help with elementary pre-service teachers’ critical racial knowledge around school segregation.

Design/methodology/approach

The author, an Elementary Social Studies Methods Instructor, developed and modeled lessons of “doing race” in social studies as one of the ways to assist elementary pre-service teachers with critical racial knowledge and commitment to do race in their future classrooms. This paper focuses on one of the modeled lessons, which centered on the topic of school segregation.

Findings

Based on the analysis of class discussion and student work, the author documented the ways in which the modeled lesson engaged pre-service teachers in disrupting the dominant discourses and teaching practices on the topic of school segregation and developing the critical understandings needed to successfully teach about race and racism in elementary classrooms.

Originality/value

The paper details actions meant to demonstrate to elementary pre-service teachers the benefits of an elementary social studies topic viewed and taught through a critical race lens. In doing so, it calls attention to the possibilities and limitations of a single lesson that targets antiracist practices.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Sohyun An

How can the author, as social studies methods instructors, assist future elementary teachers develop the knowledge and skills to engage young students in critical…

Abstract

Purpose

How can the author, as social studies methods instructors, assist future elementary teachers develop the knowledge and skills to engage young students in critical examinations of race and racism, and feel empowered to take action against racial oppression? The purpose of this paper is to share one of many possible ways of “doing race” in elementary social studies teacher education.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the author proposes the topic of school segregation as a relevant and engaging inroad for elementary students to learn about race and racism. Then, the author outlines and problematizes a dominant approach to teaching about school segregation in elementary classrooms and suggests an alternative approach informed by critical race theories. Next, the author provides counterstories to dispel the dominant narrative of school segregation from an Asian critical race theory perspective. This is followed by an explanation of the lesson the author teaches in the author’s elementary social studies methods course that utilizes these perspectives and counterstories.

Findings

By using Asian-American counterstories of school segregation, the lesson seeks to assist preservice elementary teachers in disrupting the dominant teaching practices and discourses around school segregation and helps preservice teachers develop the critical understandings and competencies needed to successfully teach about race and racism in elementary classrooms.

Originality/value

The author concludes by discussing the possibilities and implications of the lesson.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 February 2019

Marine Pepanyan, Sohyun Meacham and Stephanie Logan

The purpose of this study is to focus on the difference between perceptions of single and married international students. Four aspects are discussed to explain this issue…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to focus on the difference between perceptions of single and married international students. Four aspects are discussed to explain this issue: comfort level of international students in a host environment, their cultural representation, language competence/barrier and major challenges related to the host community. Then their attachment process was discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The study deployed a qualitative research methodology with purposeful sampling to gain a closer insight into the trails, experiences, feelings and perceptions of international students.

Findings

The findings in this qualitative research underscore the importance of the individual’s will to adjust to the host society, at the same time to preserve the valuable sense of ethnic and personal identity for each foreign student. The focus group interviews reveal that domestic students, are not necessarily hostile towards international students, but simply do not know how to approach them without intruding in and violating the privacy and cultural norms of international students.

Research limitations/implications

This qualitative study had only eight participants, which may hinder generalizability of findings. Future studies with survey methods to look into international students’ perceptions can be supplementary to the authors’ study.

Practical implications

Quantitative studies with a significant number of international students’ perceptions rather than standardized scores or administrative records can provide an important layer in the literature body. This way, future research can unpack individual differences regarding social alienation with more nuances.

Social implications

The research does not generalize the students’ experiences by classifying them into ethnic groups or representatives. However, it could be informative to look into same country population reflections, too.

Originality/value

This study is focused on the students’ marital status seeking to understand a pattern that may differentiate the sociocultural acclamation or alienation processes, exploring their socializations within academic (e.g. classmates and professors) or nonacademic contexts (e.g. on or off-campus social/affinity groups), racial–ethnic sensitivity and perceived pressure and stereotypes among foreign students.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Tiffany Hunt, Richard Carter, Ling Zhang and Sohyun Yang

The purpose of this article is to introduce micro-credentials as an innovative, personalized professional development modality. With traditional time bound professional…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to introduce micro-credentials as an innovative, personalized professional development modality. With traditional time bound professional development (PD) offering largely whole group instruction with little feedback or a focus on skill mastery, micro-credentials have the ability to develop educator skills, provide relevant content, encourage flexibility, and measure earner mastery. Although relatively new, state leaders and administrators are exploring the use of micro-credentials to improve educator practice at the individual level. Such efforts encourage systems change aligned with new technologies and advancements.

Design/methodology/approach

This article is designed to review the impetus for the use of micro-credentials in education and the potential this personalized professional development has to change and improve traditional support of educators' professional growth and skill development. We structured the article to first introduce the possibilities micro-credentials (MCs) have in initiating systems change in education. We then define MCs and explore their use in state policy. Additionally, we present the benefits MCs offer and how an individual would select and complete one. To conclude, we connect all elements in the article and emphasize the need for further research and analysis.

Findings

Findings from our review indicate that 9 states are currently exploring the use of micro-credentials in their state ESSA plans. We recognize that there are several benefits of micro-credentials that make them appealing to state leaders and administrators. These include personalization, competency, flexibility, cost efficiency, and collaboration. It is noted that a large number of organizations are offering micro-credentials and it is most often the responsibility of educators to determine which micro-credentials meet their needs and may be utilized for continuing education credit. Steps in earning micro-credentials are similar across platforms, though content, assessment expectations, and depth vary widely.

Originality/value

Rapid strides in technology have created change and advancements to societal norms, required workforce skillsets, and personalization. As a result, leaders in education are exploring new and innovative ways to provide professional development to educators. This article will introduce the concept of micro-credentials and explore their focus on personalization, competency-based learning, flexibility and skill development. Individuals interested in shifting the delivery and methodology of traditional PD will be intrigued by the potential micro-credentials offer and the work that is currently being done to explore this PD option.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2020

Richard Allen Carter Jr, Mary Rice, Sohyun Yang and Haidee A. Jackson

Many teachers and students in the USA and various parts of the world are migrating some aspects of education online out of necessity. The purpose of this paper is to…

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Abstract

Purpose

Many teachers and students in the USA and various parts of the world are migrating some aspects of education online out of necessity. The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe strategies of the self-regulated learning (SRL) framework for K-12 students learning in online environments to support remote learning with online and digital tools during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The SRL framework (Zimmerman, 2008) has been used consistently to support students in learning to work independently. This framework highlights three phases: planning, performing and evaluating. Previous research in K-12 online learning has yielded specific strategies that are useful. The paper identified and described the strategies to an audience seeking answers on how to meet the needs of students in online learning environment.

Findings

The main types of strategies that have emerged from previous studies include asking students to consider how they learn online, providing pacing support, monitoring engagement and supporting families.

Originality/value

Although the social crisis of COVID-19 is unique, prior research in online learning may be useful for supporting teacher practice and suggesting future research. Developing SRL skills of students will ensure the effectiveness of online learning that the field of education may ultimately focus on in the future.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2009

Byung Jin Kang, Sohyun Kang and Sun-Joong Yoon

This study examines the forecasting ability of the adjusted implied volatility (AIV), which is suggested by Kang, Kim and Yoon (2009), using the horserace competition with…

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Abstract

This study examines the forecasting ability of the adjusted implied volatility (AIV), which is suggested by Kang, Kim and Yoon (2009), using the horserace competition with historical volatility, model-free implied volatility, and BS implied volatility in the KOSPI 200 index options market. The adjusted implied volatility is applicable when investors are not risk averse or when underlying returns do not follow a normal distribution. This implies that AIV is consistent with the presence of risk premia for other risk such as volatility risk and jump risk. Using KOSPI 200 index options, it is shown that the AIV outperforms other volatility estimates in terms of the unbiasedness for future realized volatilities as well as the forecasting errors.

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Oriol Domínguez Martínez, Marta Colmenares Fernández and Alejandro García Hermida

The M’Hamid Oasis is the last of the palm groves in the Drâa Valley, in Southern Morocco. The 13 villages (ksar/ksour in Arabic) in M’Hamid share many sociological, urban…

Abstract

Purpose

The M’Hamid Oasis is the last of the palm groves in the Drâa Valley, in Southern Morocco. The 13 villages (ksar/ksour in Arabic) in M’Hamid share many sociological, urban, and architectural similarities with the ksour located in the pre-Saharan valleys. These similarities range from environmental threats, such as extreme climate, to the current social and economic model. As a result, the settlements are being abandoned, and the tangible and intangible heritage of the Drâa Valley is in a progressive disappearance. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To deal with the complexity of this problem, a progressive approach beginning at the territorial scale must be developed. In this regard, a lasting solution can be found only by promoting development that integrates nature, culture, and architecture, as well as by finding a new balance of these elements within the current social and economic requirements.

Findings

This paper presents part of the research conducted by the team of the Terrachidia Association, which allows an overall understanding of the place. To this aim, the new social and economic context of the Drâa Valley is pointed out, as well as the characteristic features of M’Hamid architecture and urbanism. In this regard, the principles and requirements of its conservation are presented, and the project of the Terrachidia Association is also described. Finally, the project’s impact is assessed and the results of the set of interventions are evaluated.

Practical implications

Since 2012, the activity of the Terrachidia Association has focussed on the study, promotion, preservation, and restoration of the architectural and cultural heritage of M’Hamid. The main activity of the association focusses on the organization of workshops, which are attended mainly by university students and professionals from around the world.

Social implications

In total, 13 workshops were organized since 2012, thanks to the engagement of the local population. In this period, around 300 participants from more than 15 different countries attended these workshops, working with approximately a 100 local craftsmen. All of them share a similar commitment to the work that Terrachidia is developing. These workshops allow the participants to know places and people in a way hardly achievable through conventional tourism. At the same time, this awareness is also achieved in the local population, and cultural exchange strengthens its identity.

Originality/value

The purpose of the workshops organized by Terrachidia is manifold, and the participants actively take part in the restoration works while they interact and exchange experiences with a reality that is generally unknown in western societies. The local population also benefits from this cultural exchange by strengthening their identity, which is linked to architecture, and demonstrating the economic possibilities of conservation through responsible tourism. And these aims are achieved through a self-managed project, which benefits all involved.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

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