Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Niraj Kumar and Subhajyoti Ray

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consumption patterns and attitudes towards soft drinks among Indian youth.

Downloads
1435

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the consumption patterns and attitudes towards soft drinks among Indian youth.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was used to investigate consumption patterns, attitudes, and socio-demographic profiles of college-attending respondents between the ages of 18 and 30. Cluster analysis and factor analysis were undertaken to obtain a better understanding of the attitudes among young consumers towards soft drinks. A logistic regression model was used as a predictor to distinguish between frequent and non-frequent soft drink consumers.

Findings

Indian youths preferred diet drinks and fruit juices more than regular soft drinks. Soft drinks were mostly consumed as distinct drinks (not as substitutes) and on specific occasions. Easy availability of soft drinks at the locations closure to consumers was a critical factor in determining consumers’ purchase and consumption level. Attitude towards the utility and nutritional dimensions of soft drinks had a positive and significant influence on the frequency of consumption.

Practical implications

To remain competitive, soft drinks’ companies need to focus more on healthy products and those that are refreshing and relaxing.

Social implications

Regulating the availability of soft drinks in and around educational institutions will affect consumption of soft drinks and reduce diseases.

Originality/value

Only a few studies investigating consumption patterns and attitudes among Indian youth towards soft drinks. This study attempts to fill the gap.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Faisal Shahzad, Jamshed Khan Khattak, Mobeen Jamshed Khattak and Fahad Shahzad

The purpose of this paper is to explore how consumers’ socialization influences soft drink consumption behavior in Pakistan. Since consumer socialization has long been…

Downloads
3185

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how consumers’ socialization influences soft drink consumption behavior in Pakistan. Since consumer socialization has long been considered but it is important to understand whether the extent of consumer socialization in terms of soft drink consumption influences consumer behavior by taking into consideration consumer cohorts.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative research is based on consumer survey method by using Likert scale questionnaire. Convenience sampling technique with a sample size of 637 is used. Data are analyzed by using cronbach α, ANOVA, correlation and multiple regressions.

Findings

Overall, the findings maintain the impact of consumer socialization on soft drink consumption. Such influence of consumer socialization through social media, cultural groups and social groups encourages soft drink socialization behavior. Additionally there is also an evidence of mediating role of consumer generational behavior in soft drink consumption.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this paper extend knowledge of how consumer socialization affects soft drink consumption behavior and provide important insights into how consumer cohorts should be targeted. The Chosen research approach is a limitation of the study.

Practical implications

The results are of value to academic researchers, soft drink industry practitioners in a way that it will help them to portray marketing and advertising activities by taking into consideration consumer cohorts behavior.

Social implications

This paper addresses an untapped issue on how cohorts socialization at different social setting impact on consumer soft drink consumption behavior.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a recognized need to study soft drink socialization in terms of cohort’s behavior.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2018

Nada Benajiba and Rokkaya Sami Eldib

Soft drinks consumption in Saudi Arabia is high, although these drinks are nutritionally poor and might lead to various health problems. This paper aims to assess…

Abstract

Purpose

Soft drinks consumption in Saudi Arabia is high, although these drinks are nutritionally poor and might lead to various health problems. This paper aims to assess sweetened soft drinks consumption patterns among adult Saudis and explore the association between different attitudes and these patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 1,194 eligible Saudi adults answered an online questionnaire including soft drinks consumption patterns (frequency of consumption and quantity) and attitudes influencing them. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. Pearson test was used to assess the association of attitudes with frequency of sweetened soft drinks consumption. A p-value of <0.05 was set as the significance cut-off.

Findings

Sixteen per cent of participants consumed sweetened soft drinks either daily or usually. Frequency and quantity of consumption were significantly and positively associated (R2 = 0.4, p < 0.0001). The highest correlations were obtained between frequency of consumption and positive attitudes towards perceiving sweetened soft drinks as enjoyable, value for money and indispensable at eating (R2 = 0.55; 0.43 and 0.6, respectively, p < 0.0001). Average score in different attitudes was significantly lower frequency of consumption “never” compared to “always” (p < 0.001) (Healthy: 1 vs 1.9, Enjoyable: 1.5 vs 4.4, value for money: 1.7 vs 3.9, indispensable at eating: 1.1 vs 4.0 and social gathering: 1.2 vs 3.8, respectively).

Research limitations/implications

Main limitation of this study relates to the sampling technique through a snowballing, which could influence on the representativeness of the study population.

Originality/value

Findings advance the understanding on the high consumption of sweetened soft drinks among Saudis, making an emphasis on the complexity of this dietary pattern and the importance of different attitudes influencing on it. Thus, changing this pattern implies a global strategy to reduce both frequency and quantity of consumption.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1976

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems…

Abstract

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems new. This will sometimes happen after a long period of indecision or when things are extremely difficult, as they have long been for the country, in most homes and among ordinary individuals. Watching one's life savings dwindle away, the nest‐egg laid down for security in an uncertain world, is a frightening process. This has happened to the nation, once the richest in the world, and ot its elderly people, most of them taught the habit of saving in early youth. We are also taught that what has been is past changing; the clock cannot be put back, and the largesse—much of it going to unprincipled spongers—distributed by a spendthrift Government as token relief is no answer, not even to present difficulties. The response can only come by a change of heart in those whose brutal selfishness have caused it all; and this may be a long time in coming. In the meantime, it is a useful exercise to consider our assets, to recognize those which must be protected at all costs and upon which, when sanity returns, the future depends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 1990

N. Carroll Mohn

This practitioner’s guide is based on examples which highlight the usefulness of cross tabulation as a tool for investigating cause‐effect relationships in the business…

Downloads
371

Abstract

This practitioner’s guide is based on examples which highlight the usefulness of cross tabulation as a tool for investigating cause‐effect relationships in the business environment. Although cross‐tabulations are common in statistical analysis, many managers need a better understanding of the data being presented. We consider a soft drinks application where a third factor helps uncover an association not readily apparent, in addition to different cases where a third factor causes refinement of initial conclusions based on two‐factor analysis. Because conclusions are always subject to modification with introduction of the “right” factors, we are always in the position of inferring only that an association exists. This is the rationale for why the accumulation of research studies, rather than a single result, supporting a single relationship is so important to understanding the forces driving a business.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Mabel Blades

Today there is an enormous range of soft drinks available. These may be squashes which require diluting with water or be in a ready to drink form which can be either fizzy…

Abstract

Today there is an enormous range of soft drinks available. These may be squashes which require diluting with water or be in a ready to drink form which can be either fizzy (carbonated) or still. A variety of fruit and vegetable juices is also available.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 90 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Marie Reid and Richard Hammersley

It has been suggested that habitual consumers of sugar experience “cravings” when deprived. Subjects (n = 27) who habitually consumed sugar‐sweetened drinks were placed on…

Downloads
2096

Abstract

It has been suggested that habitual consumers of sugar experience “cravings” when deprived. Subjects (n = 27) who habitually consumed sugar‐sweetened drinks were placed on a seven‐day regime receiving either sugar‐sweetened drinks, or aspartame‐sweetened alternatives. A between‐subjects design was used to prevent subjects comparing the drinks, which were given blind with the cover story that the study was testing a new drink. In fact commercial carbonated beverages were given. At the end, subjects were unable to guess which they had received. Subjects completed a prospective food diary and rated mood daily using the Profile of Mood States, as well as before and after each test drink, using simple visual analogue scales. Compared to subsequent days, on the first day of the study subjects receiving aspartame‐sweetened drinks ate fewer grams of carbohydrate and had fewer sugar episodes (where sugars, or sugar‐fat, or sugar‐alcohol mixtures were consumed). Overall energy intake for the day was unaffected. By day two, there were no differences between the groups in diet or mood. Body weight at seven days was unaltered from baseline. Blind substitution of aspartame‐sweetened for sugar‐sweetened soft drinks did not increase other sugar consumption and did not adversely affect mood. Any effects of this dietary change appear transient.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Chun-Shun Yang, Pauline Ford, Xiaoman Liu, Shaneen Leishman and Lisa Schubert

The appearance of a rapidly expanding range of ready-to-drink packaged beverages in the marketplace has been met with widespread consumer acceptance. The aim of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

The appearance of a rapidly expanding range of ready-to-drink packaged beverages in the marketplace has been met with widespread consumer acceptance. The aim of this study is to profile the nutritional composition and dental erosive potential of a sample of beverages sold for consumption in Brisbane supermarkets.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 44 beverages were assessed to determine their pH and titratable acidity. Information relating to nutritional composition was also collected.

Findings

Milk-based beverages had the highest energy concentration, while soft drinks, energy drinks, flavoured milk, and fruit and vegetable juice categories contained products with very high sugar concentrations (>10g/100ml). All beverages, except milk-based products and still water, had a pH of less than 4.8. Titratable acidity was highest for energy drinks and fruit and vegetable juices.

Research limitations/implications

Energy drinks and fruit and vegetable juices had the highest sugar content and titratable acidity of all the beverage categories and so would be expected to have the greatest potential to cause oral health problems. Milk drinks had the highest energy concentration, but the lowest erosive potential. Regular consumption of many ready-to-drink pre-packaged beverages is therefore inconsistent with recommendations in current dietary and oral health guidelines.

Originality/value

Rather than considering nutritional composition alone, this study examined both nutritional and physicochemical properties of ready-to-drink packaged beverages to reach a more holistic assessment of their health impact.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 March 2010

John C. Gardner and Carl B. McGowan

The objective of this paper is to analyze the five largest companies in the soft drink industry in the context of the regional triad theory as presented in Rugman and…

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to analyze the five largest companies in the soft drink industry in the context of the regional triad theory as presented in Rugman and Brain (2003) and later in Rugman and Verbeke (2004b, 2007). We find that of the five largest companies in the soft drink industry, only Coca‐Cola meets the definition of a global company as defined by regional triad theory. National Beverage is a strictly domestic company and Cadbury, Cott, and Pepsi are bi‐regional MNEs with sales in the NAFTA and European triad regions. Coca‐Cola reports sales in five major geographic regions, which fits the criteria of a global firm

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Dhamawatee Harnarun Etwaroo, Dayawatee Goburdhun and Arvind Ruggoo

Food additives are a group of substances added deliberately to foods to improve their organoleptic properties and stability, extend their shelf life and retain their…

Abstract

Purpose

Food additives are a group of substances added deliberately to foods to improve their organoleptic properties and stability, extend their shelf life and retain their nutritional value. The purpose of this paper is to identify the most frequently used classes of food additives and the food categories which contain the highest number of classes of additives.

Design/methodology/approach

A market survey was carried out in hypermarkets and shops where the original labels of 629 food products (195 local and 434 imported) were examined for presence of food additives. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to explore the association between food category and classes of additives, and a χ2 test was performed to establish any association between product origin and the number of classes of food additives.

Findings

In sum, 75 per cent of food samples surveyed contained at least one class of food additive. The food categories which contained the highest number of classes of food additives across the group were: snacks (12 classes), biscuits and cakes (11 classes), fish products (11 classes) and soft drinks (10 classes). The most common classes of additive used were acidity regulator, colour and preservative. χ2 test revealed a significant association (χ2 = 8.28, p < 0.05) between the origin and number of classes of food additives, and the PCA showed that biscuits were associated with raising agent, candies and snacks with colour, fruit drinks and soft drinks with acidity regulator, mayonnaise with thickener and meat products with preservative.

Research limitations/implications

The food products were sourced only from retailers selling labelled food products.

Originality/value

This novel study provides a basis for determining compliance of food products to the National Food Regulations.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000