Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Xavier Bartoll-Roca, Mercè Gotsens and Laia Palència

This study aims, firstly, to analyse the contribution of socio-economic determinants to mental health (MH) inequalities before the economic crisis, in 2006, and again in a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims, firstly, to analyse the contribution of socio-economic determinants to mental health (MH) inequalities before the economic crisis, in 2006, and again in a year during recovery, 2016, and secondly, to analyse the changes in these contributions between the two points in time in Barcelona city.

Design/methodology/approach

The concentration index (CI) was calculated for MH inequalities for the population aged 16 or older using the Barcelona Health Surveys for 2006 and 2016. MH was measured with the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. The CI was broken down for each year and gender based on a set of socio-economic determinants plus social support and the presence of chronic diseases. The contribution of each factor to variation in MH inequality between the two points in time was analysed with Oaxaca decomposition.

Findings

Income inequalities in MH increased for men and women (a CI from −0.06 in 2006 to around −0.16 in 2016). Employment status and social class are the main contributors to MH inequalities (more than 50%), except for women in 2006 that is chronic disease. The main contribution to increases in MH inequality between 2006 and 2016 was due to unemployment (26.5% men, 23.8% women), being a student (22.8% men, 20.7% women), homemaker in women (30.7%) and men in the manual class (31.6%).

Originality/value

MH inequalities have been amplified between the two years among the economically vulnerable population or for those who are out of the labour market with unexpected changes for women.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 September 2019

Franziska Deutschmann

Income inequality rose in Germany since the 1970s. To quantify the impact of different socio-economic trends on inequality, the author constructs counterfactual…

Abstract

Income inequality rose in Germany since the 1970s. To quantify the impact of different socio-economic trends on inequality, the author constructs counterfactual distributions of net household income with rich German data from the Microcensus in 1976 and 2011. The procedure allows to study the effect of marital sorting in education and includes indirect effects such as the influence of education on employment. When comparing the income distribution in West Germany for 1976 and 2011, the author finds that the prevalence of singlehood accounts to a large extent for the observed increase in inequality. The inequality increase is also associated with a change of employment among males and single females. When comparing West and East Germany in 2011, the author finds that the stronger labour market attachment of East German married females combined with the high East German unemployment produces even more income inequality than the West German employment structure. Moreover, the smaller household size boosts inequality in East Germany, whereas education works against it. In both comparisons, the author finds no significant impact of positive assortative mating in education or ageing.

Details

What Drives Inequality?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-377-8

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2013

Bastian Ravesteijn, Hans van Kippersluis and Eddy van Doorslaer

Health is distributed unequally by occupation. Workers on a lower rung of the occupational ladder report worse health, have a higher probability of disability and die…

Abstract

Health is distributed unequally by occupation. Workers on a lower rung of the occupational ladder report worse health, have a higher probability of disability and die earlier than workers higher up the occupational hierarchy. Using a theoretical framework that unveils some of the potential mechanisms underlying these disparities, three core insights emerge: (i) there is selection into occupation on the basis of initial wealth, education and health, (ii) there will be behavioural responses to adverse working conditions, which can have compensating or reinforcing effects on health and (iii) workplace conditions increase health inequalities if workers with initially low socio-economic status choose harmful occupations and don’t offset detrimental health effects. We provide empirical illustrations of these insights using data for the Netherlands and assess the evidence available in the economics literature.

Details

Health and Inequality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-553-1

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

Nagendra Kumar Maurya and Karuna Shanker Kanaujiya

The present research has been conceptualized to make an inter-district analysis in terms of IHDI of Uttar Pradesh. It aims to provide district-wise estimates of HDI and…

Abstract

Purpose

The present research has been conceptualized to make an inter-district analysis in terms of IHDI of Uttar Pradesh. It aims to provide district-wise estimates of HDI and IHDI with the latest available data, which may prove to be a critical policy input to the policy makers that how different districts are performing in terms of education, health and standard of living parameters and help in implementing tailor made policy actions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilizes the Census of India data and unit-level data of National Sample Survey (NSS) for constructing HDI and IHDI. The broad framework for computing IHDI in this study is similar to the approach of UNDP's HDR 2010. To adjust the inequality aspect, the Atkinson inequality aversion parameter has been estimated at indicator level on the basis of NSS unit record data.

Findings

The study reveals that inequality discounted income index is on an average 30 percent lower than unadjusted income index. However, quite high variation exists in case of education and health. The difference ranges from 30 percent to 40 percent in the case of education and from 3 to 36 percent in the health dimension. The surprising fact which study finds that health infrastructure and education infrastructure are poorly correlated with their respective outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers a policy suggestion that increasing investment on educational and health infrastructure will not have any significant impact on their respective outcomes unless distributional inequalities are reduced. The study also suggests that rising income inequalities are threat to inclusive growth and sustainable development goals agenda. Thus, it recommends policy makers to take pro-active timely policy measures to reduce income inequalities. The educational achievement should be fixed in terms of average years of schooling and expected years of schooling rather than in terms of literacy rate.

Originality/value

The present research is an original work. This is the first study in the case of Uttar Pradesh which attempted to estimate district-wise IHDI following the internationally accepted UNDP (2010) methodology.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 2 August 2019

Simplice Asongu, Jacinta Nwachukwu and Sara le Roux

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of inclusive human development and military expenditure in modulating the effect of terrorism on governance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of inclusive human development and military expenditure in modulating the effect of terrorism on governance.

Design/methodology/approach

It is based on 53 African countries for the period 1998–2012 and interactive generalised method of moments is employed. Six governance indicators from the World Bank and two terrorism variables are used, namely, domestic and transnational terrorism dynamics.

Findings

The following main findings are established. There is a negative net effect on governance (regulation quality and corruption-control) when inclusive human development is used to reduce terrorism. There is a positive net impact on governance (voice and accountability and rule of law) when military expenditure is used to reduce domestic terrorism.

Originality/value

The authors have complemented the sparse literature on the use of policy variables to mitigate the effect of policy syndromes on macroeconomic outcomes.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Expert briefing
Publication date: 4 December 2019

Latin American populism.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB249216

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Ranjan Kumar Prusty and Kunal Keshri

– The purpose of this paper is to understand disparities in child immunization and nutritional status among children by migration status in urban India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand disparities in child immunization and nutritional status among children by migration status in urban India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized third round of National Family Health Survey (NFHS, 2005-2006) data, which is the Indian version of Demographic and Health Survey. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression models were used to study the levels and factors associated with child nutrition and immunization by migration status.

Findings

Results suggest that malnutrition and no immunization are very high among children of rural-urban migrants and full immunization is lower than urban non-migrants and urban-urban migrants. More than half of the children from marginalized households suffer from the problem of undernutrition among rural-urban migrants. Multivariate results show economic status, age of the mother, education, caste and media exposure are negatively associated with malnutrition and positively associated with immunization. Children from south, north-east and east are found to have lesser chance of being malnourished than north region of India.

Practical implications

The challenges experienced by rural-urban migrants are reflected over their children and needs a greater attention among policy makers in India.

Originality/value

The finding of this study that children of the rural-urban migrants are in a disadvantageous position in terms of nutrition and immunization. This reflects the precarious condition of rural-urban migrants who initially settles in poor neighbourhoods, which are characterized by lack of adequate sanitation and clean water, poor housing and overcrowding, and difficulty in access to modern health services brought out by many researchers.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Aslan Kh. Abashidze, Agnessa O. Inshakova, Alexander M. Solntsev and Denis A. Gugunskiy

The purpose of the paper is to study the problem of socio-economic inequality from the positions of the neo-institutional economic theory, to determine the causal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to study the problem of socio-economic inequality from the positions of the neo-institutional economic theory, to determine the causal connections of emergence and manifestation of this problem as a barrier on the path of sustainable development and to develop institutional measures for its solution based on state regulation.

Design/methodology/approach

The scientific and methodological basis of this research is based on regression analysis, which is used for creating and analyzing the regression curves. For the fullest coverage of countries of the world and provision of high representation of the research results, the objects of the research are countries from each category that were distinguished according to their position in the global rating of countries as to the index of sustainable development, calculated and compiled by Sustainable Development Solutions Network (2019).

Findings

It is substantiated that financial inequality is a result of violation of the principles of social justice—primarily, in the labor market. The institutional approach, which is used for studying the problem of socio-economic inequality, allows presenting this problem as a result of the action of social institutes with own system of rules and norms and offering the institutional measures of regulation, which are to influence the rules and norms in society in the labor market. Due to this, the object of regulation is not the consequence but the reasons—and better and long-term results are achieved.

Originality/value

It is proved that social justice is the key condition of overcoming socio-economic inequality, formation of inclusive society and achievement of balance of the global economic system—thus opening a path to sustainable development. Four “institutional traps” are determined, which establish the practices of violation of the principles of social justice in the system of norms and rules of behavior of the labor market's participants. The authors determine perspectives and directions and offer measures of state regulation of the institutes of socio-economic inequality for its overcoming and provision of sustainable development of national economy and the global economy.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2018

Ali Kazemi Karyani, Satar Rezaei, Behzad Karami Matin and Saeed Amini

Poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is one of the important issues in the health sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and…

Abstract

Purpose

Poor health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is one of the important issues in the health sector. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the prevalence and socio-economic inequality in poor HRQoL in Tehran city, Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 562 adults were included in this cross-sectional study. The cluster sampling method was used for data collection from May to June, 2016 in Tehran city, Iran. Data on HRQoL, using EuroQol 5-dimensions questionnaire, and data on socio-economic and demographic variables were gathered. Convenience regression method was performed to measure the concentration index (CI). Decomposition analysis was performed to determine the contribution of variables on socio-economic inequality in poor HRQoL. All analyses were performed by Stata v.14.

Findings

The prevalence of poor HRQoL was 28.3 percent. The value of CI for “poor HRQoL” was −0.299 (95% confidence interval: −0.402 to −0.195). Socio-economic status (SES) was the largest contributor to socio-economic inequality in poor HRQoL (69.44 percent of inequality was explained by SES). Age, obesity and race had a positive contribution to socio-economic inequality in poor HRQoL among the participants. Nonetheless, sex and smoking intensity had a negative contribution to inequality in poor HRQoL.

Originality/value

There is little evidence about the prevalence of poor HRQoL in insured people. This study provided new evidence in this area through the investigation of socio-economic inequality in poor HRQoL and its determinants among people with health insurance in Iran using decomposition analysis.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Joan Costa and Jaume Garcia

This paper empirically examines the inequalities related to social class and income using individual self‐reported health status data. Health inequalities are estimated by…

Downloads
1151

Abstract

This paper empirically examines the inequalities related to social class and income using individual self‐reported health status data. Health inequalities are estimated by different indexes using individual standardised and unstandardised health status data. The population was divided into income and social class, respectively. From this two main results are obtatined: inequalities are sensitive to the health status variable and the social position variable employed. It was found that significant health related social class inequalities were insignificant when income was employed as a reference variable.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000