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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Antonios Kaniadakis

The aim of this paper is to contribute to an understanding of enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation that goes beyond the restricted time and space limits of a…

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1371

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to contribute to an understanding of enterprise resource planning (ERP) implementation that goes beyond the restricted time and space limits of a project‐based restructuring effort, and to understanding of it as a broader socio‐economic phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of the adoption and implementation of an ERP in a Greek bank is examined through an extended multi‐level analytical framework based on Pettigrew's “contextualist” and “processual” research model. The metaphor of the ancient Athenian agora is used to theorise the socio‐economic environment around ERP implementation. In‐depth, semi‐structured interviews and documents were used as data.

Findings

Findings suggest that although ERP implementation is seen by the majority of relevant IS literature as happening locally in restricted time‐frame, project‐based efforts, it rather emerges from broader socio‐economic contexts of the agora of techno‐organisational change. Different actors develop bounded understandings (viewpoints) of the agora which they use to navigate and engage it. A viewpoint is also a mechanism to link an actor's local circumstances with broad socio‐economic developments.

Research limitations/implications

The context of financial services/markets offers possibilities for future research around ERP given the ongoing need for integration of legacy systems. Future case studies in financial service organisations could provide a link between frequent financial crises and technological development. Also, future studies of multiple ERP implementations as well as studies focusing on ERP suppliers’ choices, could add a comparative dimension useful to understand alternative agora configurations.

Practical implications

Practitioners should approach ERP implementation as a broad socio‐economic phenomenon instead of a project‐based episode of change.

Originality/value

Originality lies on the development of an extended, multi‐level analytical approach and on the introduction of a new spatial metaphor for understanding the socio‐economic environment around ERP implementation.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Jan Heystek and Raymond Emekako

This paper examines motivational practices and engagements of schools – through strategies developed by principals with the members of the school management team – to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines motivational practices and engagements of schools – through strategies developed by principals with the members of the school management team – to improve academic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research used an interpretive approach within a qualitative design in which schools were purposefully selected. In each of the sampled schools, individual interviews were conducted with the principal as well as a focus group with the school management team and another focus group was identified teachers.

Findings

The main findings reveal that school labelling (where schools are labelled as underperforming schools) as a public notice was identified as the main push towards intrinsic motivation, especially when positive results in learner performance are eventually achieved. Extra classes, teaching collaboration, monitoring and team building were some of the main strategies used. Efforts appear to focus on performance in Grade 12 examinations. Therefore, the study recommends that attention be spread across all grades as a long-term improvement plan for the education system. Furthermore, since these strategies have worked successfully, the national and the provincial education departments should consider developing plans for academic improvement based on these strategies.

Research limitations/implications

This research contributed to the understanding of school improvement in a specific context of low socio economic and societal context and schools are able to improve in spite of the challenging context. This is specifically in a developing country's context. More research can be conducted about the specific influence of intrinsic motivation and how extrinsic factors can become internalised as intrinsic motivation factors.

Practical implications

The findings from this project can provide leadership at schools with the necessary information and examples of what can be done to get teachers to improve the performance in a challenging context. The use of extrinsic as well as intrinsic motivational actions can provide the leadership with the necessary guidelines to implement in their schools. The appointment of principals with specific characteristics needed attention in policy as well as the practice of the appointment process.

Originality/value

The research is contributed to the knowledge of school improvement from a perspective of a developing country and is using motivational theories within this context. The limited literature which links motivation to the process of school improvement is advanced from ice perspective of low socio economic context in a developing country.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

S.M. Riad Shams and Rajibul Hasan

Transnationalism and transnational concept are extensively researched in many social science areas; however, transnational management and transnational marketing is…

Abstract

Purpose

Transnationalism and transnational concept are extensively researched in many social science areas; however, transnational management and transnational marketing is relatively a less explored research domain. Also, knowledge management for transnational education (TNE) marketing is not well-researched. Capacity building is an established research-stream, with a key focus on socio-economic and ecological development; however, prior research on capacity building from the context of TNE’s knowledge management and marketing is scarce. The purpose of this study is to analyse TNE marketing mix, to understand the influence of transnational stakeholders’ causal scope(s) on knowledge management in TNE to uphold their transnatioalisation processes through capacity building in TNEs’ marketing management.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive constructivist method is followed.

Findings

Organisational learning from the context of transnational market and socio-economic competitive factors, based on analysing the transnational stakeholders’ causal scope(s) is imperative for proactive knowledge management capacity in TNE marketing. Following the analysis of transnational stakeholders’ causal scope(s) to learn about the cause and consequence of the transnational stakeholders’ relationships and interactions, an initial conceptual framework of knowledge management for TNE marketing is proposed. Practical insights from different TNE markets are developed in support of this novel knowledge management capacity building framework of TNE, and its generalisation perspectives and future research areas are discussed.

Practical implications

These insights will be useful for TNE administrators to better align their knowledge management perspectives and propositions with their transnational stakeholders to underpin TNE marketing. Academics will be able to use these insights as a basis for future research.

Originality/value

This study proposes a novel conceptual stakeholder-centred capacity building framework for TNE’s knowledge management to uphold TNE marketing and supports the framework, based on practical insights from three different transnational markets.

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Nizar Mohammad Alsharari

The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of accounting education and practice as influenced by the socio-economic transformation in Jordan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the development of accounting education and practice as influenced by the socio-economic transformation in Jordan.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents an explanatory study of how accounting education and practice has developed in relation to socio-economic change in Jordan, using the institutional economic theory-based constructivist approach, in which knowledge is constructed by compiling data from different sources, including historical and statistical analyses, documents, and archival records.

Findings

The study finds that accounting education in Jordan cannot be effectively studied without reference to how accounting practice affects, and is affected by the social, economic, political and cultural dimensions of its operating environment. The study finds that accounting change has been driven by the Jordanian Government’s response to the macroeconomic challenges that had historically restricted economic growth, including the scarcity of natural resources, budget deficits, soaring debt, and structural unemployment. The ongoing program of privatization has been a significant contributor to economic, accounting, and legal change. Since accountancy is accepted as a social practice, culture plays a significant role in accounting research, and cultural factors bearing on accounting education and practice in Jordan include the historical imposition of western accounting paradigms in developing countries, Jordan’s cultural values, the quality of its education system, and the disparity between the private sector’s and public management’s embrace of technology and applications for management accounting. The study finds that accounting education in Jordan cannot be effectively studied without reference to how accounting affects, and is affected by the social, economic, political and cultural dimensions of its operating environment.

Research limitations/implications

This paper describes the development of accounting education in an environment of socio-economic change, which has potential implications for accounting practitioners, academics, and policy makers in developing countries. The study’s constructivist approach selected with the aim of constructing a picture of the change environment, and thus, present new knowledge in a compilation of data limits, however, the generalizability of the findings.

Originality/value

The paper is a one of very few research studies in the accounting literature to present evidence from the Middle East of how accounting education and practice has developed in response to socio-economic transformation, and has itself contributed to socio-economic growth in Jordan. The significance of cultural factors in these developments provides further understanding of the dynamics of developing accounting education and practice in the era of globalization.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Rania Kamla, Sonja Gallhofer and Jim Haslam

This paper adds to a focus of the social accounting literature (on perceptions and attitudes to social accounting) by seeking to offer insights into Syrian accountants'…

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14032

Abstract

Purpose

This paper adds to a focus of the social accounting literature (on perceptions and attitudes to social accounting) by seeking to offer insights into Syrian accountants' attitudes towards, and perceptions of, social accounting in Syria in the first decade of the twenty‐first century, with particular attention to its role, future development and implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of an analysis of interviews of Syrian accountants; contextual analysis (and an appreciation of the prior literature).

Findings

Syrian accountants' perceptions are shaped by developments in Syria's socio‐political and economic context, encompassing imperialism/colonialism, globalisation and cultural specificities, including Islam. Interviewees perceived a significant role for a social accounting – that would parallel the Western form of social accounting – in enhancing well‐being in the dynamic context. At the same time, they were reluctant to see the development and implementation of this accounting in Syria as an urgent issue, so that this social accounting might be left initially at least with an even more marginal part to play than in the West. The study suggests that a combination of forces – global developments, Western imperialism and Syria's colonial history – have had a substantively repressive rather than progressive impact on the development of social accounting in Syria vis‐à‐vis its more positive potential.

Research limitations/implications

All limitations of interview research apply. This study focuses on Syria in a context when economic transition was a major issue. Further studies of economies in transition would be of interest.

Practical implications

An awareness of how the local and the global interact in debates over social accounting can provide insights for policy makers concerned with accounting regulation.

Originality/value

The focus on Syria, a non‐Western country, enriches the social accounting literature, which focuses mainly on Western developments.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Zografia Bika and Peter Rosa

Previous studies have largely examined interregional variations of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) rather than family firm concentrations. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous studies have largely examined interregional variations of small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) rather than family firm concentrations. This paper aims to address this gap through an analysis of firm type indicators across Europe from the Eurostat database, using social, economic and demographic statistics at the NUTS 2 regional level to ascertain the nature, prevalence and regional contexts of family firm concentrations.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical clustering is performed to map the regional distribution of the European family business.

Findings

Results show that the co-existence of family SMEs with large firms is negatively related to regional economic performance, and this variation has implications for the understanding of the survival and strategic behaviour of family firms.

Originality/value

The study promotes a new family business “in context” than “by context” point of view and paves the way for further empirical work with interregional family business data at various spatial levels.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Eziyi Offia Ibem

The aim of this research is to identify the factors responsible for the inability of authorities in rapidly growing megacities in developing countries to integrate…

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2595

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to identify the factors responsible for the inability of authorities in rapidly growing megacities in developing countries to integrate disaster risk vulnerability reduction strategies effectively with their development plans.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed a qualitative research strategy. A survey research approach with pre‐tested questionnaires as key data collection instrument was used in eliciting responses from 135 randomly selected built environment professionals in academics and disaster management practitioners in government and non‐governmental organizations in Lagos Megacity Area, Nigeria.

Findings

A number of factors militating against the adoption of effective disaster vulnerability reduction strategies in the area were identified. The most critical were faltering institutions and governance, weak infrastructure base and a low level of disaster education.

Research limitations/implications

The sample population comprised mainly built environment professionals in academics and disaster managers across the city. Therefore, the views presented in the paper may not be considered generalizable within the context of multiplicity of stakeholders in disaster studies. However, the research presents the perception of experts and key stakeholders in disaster vulnerability reduction in the study area.

Practical implications

The findings can form the basis for addressing these challenges, most particularly in generating and adopting new approaches to policy formulation and implementation by the public and private sectors.

Originality/value

Research on this subject‐matter is very limited in Nigeria. It is, however, very relevant in efforts at addressing the challenges of sustainable development in developing countries from the human and policy dimensions.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Óscar González‐Benito, Javier González‐Benito and Pablo A. Muñoz‐Gallego

This article aims to offer empirical evidence pertaining to the relationship among entrepreneurship, market orientation and business performance within the context of…

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4257

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to offer empirical evidence pertaining to the relationship among entrepreneurship, market orientation and business performance within the context of disadvantaged socio‐economic regions of the European Union.

Design/methodology/approach

Two groups of hypotheses investigate the relationship between entrepreneurship and market orientation and the joint effect of these dimensions on performance. All questions are approached using survey data from 183 firms located in the Castilla y Leon region, Spain.

Findings

A strong relationship exists between entrepreneurship and market orientation. Although these orientations may be implemented separately, firms emphasise entrepreneurship when they are market‐oriented. Therefore, the strong relationship and complementarities between entrepreneurship and market orientation reduce the effort involved in the joint adoption of both orientations. Both orientations also demonstrate a strong relationship with performance, such that each contributes specifically.

Originality/value

The article shows that, despite little evidence of synergic effects of the joint adoption of both orientations, the specific aspects that differentiate entrepreneurship and market orientation both contribute to improving performance, and therefore, firms should foster a market‐oriented, entrepreneurial organisational culture.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Thushari Welikala and Ronald Barnett

The internationalisation of teaching and learning in higher education necessarily invokes the concept of culture with its emphasis on improving cultural awareness and…

Abstract

The internationalisation of teaching and learning in higher education necessarily invokes the concept of culture with its emphasis on improving cultural awareness and developing intercultural competency. However, how students and academics respond to manifestations of culture in teaching and learning and how their perceptions have changed over the years have seldom been explored. Drawing on data from four studies on internationalisation, three paradigms of cultural responses in teaching and learning are identified: (1) a multicultural paradigm; (2) an intercultural paradigm; and (3) a post-cultural paradigm. Within institutions, all three paradigms co-occur, in different degrees. However, there are intimations here of a shift in the balance of the three paradigms over time. Further, this chapter poses questions about the pedagogical implications for internationalisation and interculturality in higher education so suggesting the opening of a future research programme on the relationship between pedagogy and culture.

Details

Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: The Context of Being, Interculturality and New Knowledge Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-007-5

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Habib Kachlami and Darush Yazdanfar

The purpose of this paper is to study the firm-level financial variables affecting the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

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2904

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the firm-level financial variables affecting the growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies a resource-based view to analyze the firm-level as well as industry-level determinants of SME growth. Empirical evidence has also been provided from a data set of SMEs in Sweden to support the hypotheses. For a robust statistical analysis, three models – ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, random-effects regression and fixed-effects regression – are used to examine the influence of explanatory variables on growth.

Findings

The findings of this study show a positive and significant influence of profitability, short-term debt and size on a firm’s growth across all three models. Results regarding the influence of long-term debt on growth, however, are mixed. While the results of a fixed-effect model show the negative and significant influence of long-term debt on growth, the results according to OLS and random effects show long-term debt positively related to growth.

Research limitations/implications

This study has been conducted over a period of four years and in the context of Sweden which may limit the generalizability of its results for longer periods and for different contexts. Moreover, the low explanatory power of the models implies the need to also consider other types of variables, such as managerial or socio-economic variables, to better explain the determinants of SME growth.

Practical implications

Understanding the determinants of growth can be important for policy makers, SME managers and financial institutions. The findings of this study can be used for designing policies which stimulate SME growth. Realizing the financial resources that influence growth can also help SME managers and financial institutions to understand each other’s need for better cooperation.

Originality/value

This paper applies different models for analyzing large and cross-sectoral data regarding SME growth in the context of Sweden.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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