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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2021

Ou Wang, Simon Somogyi and Richard Ablett

This study explores the influence of quality attributes and socio-demographics on Chinese consumers' general and online consumption of three origin-specific lobsters…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the influence of quality attributes and socio-demographics on Chinese consumers' general and online consumption of three origin-specific lobsters: Canadian, United States and Australian.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based survey was administrated to 981 consumers from two cities in China: Shanghai and Qingdao. Descriptive analysis and binary logistic regression were used in the data analysis.

Findings

Chinese consumers were more willing to pay for the lobster quality attributes vitality, meat content, texture, size and safety. Their general and online consumption of three origin-specific lobsters is significantly linked to the following quality attributes and socio-demographics: meat content, size, shell hardness, texture, safety, nutrition, age, income, education, occupation, residential place and marital status.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore the influence of quality attributes and socio-demographics on consumers' online consumption of luxury seafood.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Emma Lea and Tony Worsley

To examine consumers' beliefs about organic foods and their relationship with socio‐demographics and self‐transcendence (universal, benevolence) personal values.

12017

Abstract

Purpose

To examine consumers' beliefs about organic foods and their relationship with socio‐demographics and self‐transcendence (universal, benevolence) personal values.

Design/methodology/approach

A random questionnaire‐based mail survey of 500 Australian (Victorian) adults (58 per cent response) was used. The questionnaire included items on organic food beliefs, the importance of self‐transcendence values as guiding principles in life, and socio‐demographics. Statistical analyses included cross‐tabulations of organic food beliefs by socio‐demographics and multiple regression analyses of positive organic food beliefs with personal value and socio‐demographic items as the independent variables.

Findings

The majority of participants believed organic food to be healthier, tastier and better for the environment than conventional food. However, expense and lack of availability were strong barriers to the purchasing of organic foods. Generally, women were more positive about organic food than men (e.g. women were more likely to agree that organic food has more vitamins/minerals than conventional food). The personal value factor related to nature, environment and equality was the dominant predictor of positive organic food beliefs, followed by sex. These predictors accounted for 11 per cent of the variance.

Research limitations/implications

A survey response bias needs to be taken into account. However, the response rate was adequate for reporting and differences in age and education between participants and the Victorian population were taken into account in data presentation. Future understanding of consumers' use of organic foods will require the inclusion of a fairly extensive set of potential influences.

Practical implications

Communication appeals based on psychographics may be a more effective way to alter consumers' beliefs about organic foods than those based on demographic segmentation.

Originality/value

To the best of one's knowledge, this is the first study to examine the relationship between personal values, socio‐demographics and organic food beliefs in a random population sample. This study is relevant to producers, processors and retailers of organic food and those involved with food and agricultural policy.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2008

Su‐Hsin Lee, Shu‐Chen Chang, Jing‐Shoung Hou and Chung‐Hsien Lin

The paper aims to differentiate the differences of both night market experience and image between temporary residents and foreign visitors in Taiwan and to explore the…

2466

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to differentiate the differences of both night market experience and image between temporary residents and foreign visitors in Taiwan and to explore the relationship between experience and image.

Design/methodology/approach

Night market experiences comprise the dimensions of Schmitt's experiential marketing theory and night market image is analyzed by exploratory factor analysis. This research probes the socio‐demographics differences of experience and image between temporary residents and foreign visitors. Canonical analysis explores the experience‐image relationships.

Findings

Some socio‐demographics have relativity differences in night market experiences and images. Visitors have stronger thinking experience than temporary residents. Temporary residents have stronger image in atmosphere, while foreign visitors have general stronger images than temporary residents. Canonical analysis shows that visitors have stronger relationships between experience and image than temporary residents.

Practical implications

Marketing organizations must develop marketing strategies specific to cultural background and the length of residence of its specific visitors.

Originality/value

The paper provides the evidence showing that familiarity and novelty‐seeking would be of particular importance to examine whether experience and image are equally applicable to the various foreign visitors.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2020

Ou Wang, Simon Somogyi and Sylvain Charlebois

This study associated consumers' food choice motives and socio-demographic characteristics with their attitudes and consumptions towards food shopping with four e-commerce…

3735

Abstract

Purpose

This study associated consumers' food choice motives and socio-demographic characteristics with their attitudes and consumptions towards food shopping with four e-commerce modes: business-to-consumer (B2C), online-to-offline delivery (O2O Delivery), online-to-offline in-store (O2O In-store) and New Retail. It also explored consumer preferences for specific food categories within the four e-commerce modes.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was administered to 954 participants from three Chinese cities: Beijing, Shanghai and Shenzhen. Descriptive analysis and linear regression were used in the data analysis.

Findings

The following food choice motives (FCMs) and socio-demographic characteristics had a significant effect on food e-commerce attitudes and/or consumption, with some or all of the four e-commerce modes: Taste Appeal, Value for Money, Safety Concerns, Quality Concerns, Processed Convenience, Purchase Convenience, Others' Reviews, City, Gender, Household Size, Age, Income, Occupation and Marital Status. Consumers also have different consumption preferences for food categories in the four e-commerce modes.

Originality/value

This is the first study to associate consumer FCMs and socio-demographics with their e-commerce attitudes and consumption regarding food in four e-commerce modes: B2C, O2O Delivery, O2O In-store and New Retail.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Pasi Pohjolainen, Markus Vinnari and Pekka Jokinen

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the barriers perceived by consumers to lowering their meat consumption levels and adopting a plant-based diet, which means a diet…

8275

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the barriers perceived by consumers to lowering their meat consumption levels and adopting a plant-based diet, which means a diet that includes mainly non-meat foods, yet it can contain both vegetarian and meat meals.

Design/methodology/approach

The prevalence of different barriers for following a plant-based diet is addressed, as well as consumer profiles considering socio-demographics, values and meat consumption frequencies. The data were collected in 2010 by a survey questionnaire, sent to 4,000 randomly selected Finns (response rate=47.3, n=1,890).

Findings

Different types of barriers are perceived to hinder the adoption of a plant-based diet, including meat enjoyment, eating routines, health conceptions and difficulties in preparing vegetarian foods. These barriers are strongly correlated, indicating that consumers may not make qualitative difference between different barriers. Furthermore, there are distinct socio-demographic, value and especially meat consumption frequency elements that strengthen the barrier perception, these being male gender, young age, rural residence, household type of families with children, low education, absence of a vegetarian family member or friend, valuation of traditions and wealth and high meat consumption frequency.

Social implications

High meat consumption is related to many environmental and public health problems. The results call for multifaceted policy implications that should concentrate on different barriers and certain socio-demographic, value and meat eating groups. Importantly, focus should be not only on the group with the strongest barrier perception but also on those particularly willing to make changes in their meat consumption patterns. One practical implication could be to increase the availability of vegetarian foods in public cafeterias or school canteens, as a decrease in meat consumption frequency is strongly correlated with the alleviation of the barrier perception.

Originality/value

Information about differences in socio-demographics, values and meat consumption frequencies between consumers provide opportunities for focussing policy actions to aid the adoption of a plant-based diet.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2018

Kirstin Hallmann, Christoph Breuer, Michael Ilgner, Thomas Giel and Lea Rossi

The purpose of this paper is to identify the determinants of success of elite athletes by applying the concept of career success to a sporting context. The concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the determinants of success of elite athletes by applying the concept of career success to a sporting context. The concept of career success includes extrinsic (i.e. tangible) career accomplishments like medals as well as intrinsic factors referring to subjective judgements about career attainments. Thereby, a holistic perspective is taken which has not been studied extensively before.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous literature, a theoretical model was derived outlining how human capital, motivation, organisational characteristics and socio-demographics affect both intrinsic and extrinsic career success. To measure the impact of these factors, primary (n=1,249) and secondary data of elite athletes were collected. Regression analyses indicated that all factors included in the theoretical model were associated with extrinsic and intrinsic success.

Findings

Institutional support was an important driver for intrinsic career success while financial support affected extrinsic career success. There was no significant influence of extrinsic career success on intrinsic career success.

Practical implications

These findings imply that policy makers should offer enhanced dual career options, such as mentoring programmes, aspects like sport-psychological support and nutrition counselling, and long-term, stable financial support for athletes to maximise career success.

Originality/value

This paper applies the construct of career success to sports. A focus on the athletes’ intrinsic career success is placed as this area has been neglected in past research.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Ronald B. Larson

Socio-demographic control variables are added to food attitude analyses to improve the understanding of consumer preferences. However, socio-demographics can provide an…

Abstract

Purpose

Socio-demographic control variables are added to food attitude analyses to improve the understanding of consumer preferences. However, socio-demographics can provide an incomplete picture of prospective buyers. Including other variables in a food analysis may offer businesses, researchers and policymakers more insights into consumer food preferences. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

An internet survey of 725 adults in the USA was used to examine interest in four food traits that may be included in marketing claims: antibiotic-free meat, Humanely-raised meat, produce that could be traced back to the farm and gluten-free food. Besides standard socio-demographics, environmental preferences, impulsive buying, religiosity, spirituality, privacy concerns and social desirability bias (SDB) measures were used to predict buyer interest.

Findings

Some standard socio-demographics (e.g. gender, age and income), green attitudes, impulsive traits and concern for information privacy were associated with preferences for three of the food attributes. These linkages can help define useful segments. The results for the fourth food trait, gluten-free, should generate additional medical research. In addition, the SDB measure was significant, suggesting that social norms may favour these traits.

Originality/value

The four food traits studied in this research appear to be growing in the market and have had limited attention in prior research. Many of the independent variables (e.g. green attitudes, impulsive traits, privacy concerns) included in the models provided more information about consumer preferences and may be helpful in other food studies. The findings on gluten-free products should receive further study.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Yeolib Kim and Jae Seon Jeong

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Big-Five model of personality traits relates to the use of multiple internet functions and test if the relationship differs…

1104

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Big-Five model of personality traits relates to the use of multiple internet functions and test if the relationship differs by gender, age, and education.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the research questions, this study uses data from a large-scale survey of 9,479 Korean media users. Poisson’s regression is applied to model the count data, which accounts for the number of internet functions used. In the regression models, the first block entered is socio-demographics followed by a second block including personality traits.

Findings

Results indicate that openness to experience and conscientiousness are positively related to using multiple internet functions, whereas emotional stability has a negative relationship. The findings differed depending on age and education. The younger age cohort, with higher levels of conscientiousness and extraversion, are likely to use more internet functions. In addition, the relationship between conscientiousness and using multiple internet functions is relevant for users with higher education levels.

Originality/value

The present paper is the first that uses multiple internet functions as a critical variable to study individual difference factors. Overall, this study provides evidence that individual difference factors such as socio-demographics and personality traits have a strong role to play in internet research.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Johan Bruwer and Emily McCutcheon

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the insights provided by adopting a behaviourism perspective of the socio-demographics, consumption…

1535

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the insights provided by adopting a behaviourism perspective of the socio-demographics, consumption dynamics and retail channel patronage of wine consumers and the potential marketing implications these have.

Design/methodology/approach

Systematic random sampling yielded 811 surveys of wine consumers collected at households across Australia’s three main consumption metropoles. A hierarchical multiple regression model is used to test the predictive ability of the socio-demographical variables, gender and age, on personal wine consumption.

Findings

Specific differences exist in the consumption behaviour and wine type preferences of males and females, and between generational cohorts, specifically Millennial and older consumers. There are gender significant differences in wine type consumption, which in turn is moderated by not only the “classical” socio-demographic variables, but also the retail outlet types preferred for product purchase. Younger Millennial females place more importance on external choice cues in making their buying decision than males. The gender and age generation socio-demographic variables are not strong predictors of personal wine consumption.

Practical implications

Opportunities exist for niche-marketed brands targeted at specific segments such as young females and this study highlighted their specific needs and consumer behaviour dynamics.

Originality/value

This study illustrates through carefully executed wine consumer behaviour research, directed by questioning from the extant literature, how information derived from a behaviourism perspective can intelligently inform marketing strategies. In the process, it also provides “baselines” for future research.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 July 2018

Andreas Oehler, Matthias Horn and Florian Wedlich

The purpose of this paper is to derive the determinants of young adults’ subjective and objective risk attitude in theoretical and real-world financial decisions…

1062

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive the determinants of young adults’ subjective and objective risk attitude in theoretical and real-world financial decisions. Furthermore, a comparison of the factors that influence young adults’ and older adults’ risk attitude is provided.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on an experimental setting and a cross-sectional field study using data of the German central bank’s (Deutsche Bundesbank) PHF-Survey.

Findings

Young adults’ objective risk aversion is not constant but increases with stake sizes. Furthermore, young adults’ subjective risk attitude is a better predictor for their objective risk attitude than a set of commonly employed socio-demographics and economics like age or income. Moreover, young adults’ subjective risk attitude works as a mediator for the influence of their investable financial wealth on their objective risk attitude. Although young adults’ subjective risk attitude shows a gender effect, the influence of young adults’ gender on their objective risk attitude decreases with higher stake sizes. Compared to older adults, young adults generally show a similar degree of subjective risk aversion. However, due to stronger financial restrictions, young adults show a higher degree of objective risk aversion.

Originality/value

Although individuals’ financial outcomes depend on the financial behavior established in young adulthood, there is no study that simultaneously analyzes the determinants of young adults’ subjective and objective risk attitude in real-world financial decisions with a focus on young adults as a separate age group. The paper closes this gap in literature and additionally provides a comparison of the subsamples of young adults and older adults. The analysis in this paper reveals that young adults’ lower engagement in financial markets is primarily driven by their tight budget and not by a fundamental different subjective risk attitude.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

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