Search results

1 – 10 of over 22000
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Edwin Mirfazli

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical proof concerning the social focus of responsibility information disclosure – dominant in annual reports of basic and…

2847

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical proof concerning the social focus of responsibility information disclosure – dominant in annual reports of basic and chemical industries groups – and how the company's group type affects the amount and focus of social disclosure in a company's annual report.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explains and describes data characteristics employed in the research. Annual reports are analyzed by content analysis method.

Findings

The results show that the main foci of social disclosure from companies registered at the Indonesia Stock Exchange are labor theme (51.60 percent), followed by customer theme (19.40 percent), society theme (14.70 percent) and environmental theme (14.30 percent), respectively. Hypothesis test proved that there is no significant difference in the presentation of social disclosure amount in all themes between companies in the basic and chemical industries group or in the variety industries group.

Research limitations/implications

The composing of a social disclosure list tends to be subjective and it is possible to omit certain items that are supposed to be disclosed by the company.

Practical implications

The paper shows that it is necessary to pay increased attention to the social environment, considering that companies and society are equally important.

Originality/value

This paper describes the importance of amount, manner, and the reason behind a company's social responsibility disclosure.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Lois S. Mahoney, Daniel R. Brickner and William LaGore

This research is one of the first studies to examine the effects of CSR disclosures on a firm’s decision to purchase back their own shares of stocks. Additionally, the…

Abstract

This research is one of the first studies to examine the effects of CSR disclosures on a firm’s decision to purchase back their own shares of stocks. Additionally, the authors examine whether the effect of CSR disclosures is stronger than the effect of CSR performance on the decision to repurchase shares. Examining firms in the United States, the authors find that total CSR disclosures and the CSR disclosures related to the dimensions of social, environmental, and governance are significantly and positively related to the number of shares that a firm buys back. Additionally, the authors find that the effects of CSR disclosures are stronger for total and the CSR dimensions of social and governance than for CSR performance. For the environmental dimension of CSR, both disclosure and performance scores are significant. This research expands our understanding of the impact of CSR disclosure by showing the importance it plays in the decision to buy back stock and implies that firms that repurchase their stock are more socially responsive than firms that do not. Finally, it contributes to the growing literature on how CSR disclosure has a different impact than CSR performance on firm decisions and outcomes.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-758-9

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 November 2014

Ericka Costa

This article analyzes the interplay between regulation and social and environmental reporting in northern Italian social enterprises. Specifically, it investigates how…

Abstract

This article analyzes the interplay between regulation and social and environmental reporting in northern Italian social enterprises. Specifically, it investigates how “non-accredited” social enterprises discharge voluntary accountability before and after the introduction of regulation making social and environmental reporting compulsory for “accredited-social enterprises.” By developing a content analysis on 170 stand-alone social and environmental reports, this article provides a longitudinal analysis of voluntary disclosures in a regulated context from 2006 (before regulation) to 2009 (after regulation). Based on the total number of disclosures and the average number of sentences per report, Italian “non-regulated” social enterprises showed increased voluntary disclosure on social and environmental matters from 2006 to 2009; however, when analyzing the average sentences per report, it emerges that the information contained in the stand-alone social and environmental reports decreased, especially disclosures related to “social-related issues.” This article looks beyond crude noncompliance analysis with legislation and analyzes if the regulation influences organizations’ voluntary disclosure. It analyzes all of the social and environmental disclosures provided by northern Italian “non-accredited” social enterprises before and after the introduction of regulation. The novelty of this article rests in the fact that it does not analyze the social and environmental disclosure of “legal social enterprises”; rather, it considers the whole voluntary disclosure context for “non-accredited” social enterprises in a regulated environment.

Details

Accountability and Social Accounting for Social and Non-Profit Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-004-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

GC Maheshwari

Empirical studies on corporate social responsibility disclosures have been conducted in Western countries to consider the possible sources of pressure for disclosure and…

Abstract

Empirical studies on corporate social responsibility disclosures have been conducted in Western countries to consider the possible sources of pressure for disclosure and also to examine the effect of corporate size, systematic risk, social constraints and management decision horizon upon such disclosure. This paper undertakes an empirical study in India, in order to extend the understanding of specific relationships between individual corporate characteristics and the types of social responsibility disclosures that public sector companies make. One hundred annual reports from ten industries are analysed use to consider the impact of four independent variables (size, industry, profitability, and presence of social responsibility committee) on the number of disclosures in each of the seven categories (environment, energy, fair business practices, human resources, community involvement, product safety and other disclosures). Regression analysis revealed, amongst other findings, that 28% of the variation in total number of disclosures is explained by four independent variables and that company size is the most significant variable.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Abul Hassan and Sofyan Syafri Harahap

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether any discrepancy exists between the corporate social activities disclosed in the annual reports of Islamic banks and the…

7268

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether any discrepancy exists between the corporate social activities disclosed in the annual reports of Islamic banks and the corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure index which has been developed based on the Islamic business ethics framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on a survey of annual reports of seven Islamic banks using the method of content analysis to measure the volume of CSR disclosure.

Findings

The results show the overall mean CSR disclosure index of one Islamic bank out of seven to be above average and the issues of CSR are not of major concern for most Islamic banks.

Research limitations/implications

CSR disclosure in the Islamic banks is experimental and could be explored in greater depth in future studies.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications for academics and researchers, as they pave the ways for further investigation. The results also have important implication for Accounting and Auditing Organisation for Islamic Financial Institutions in developing a CSR reporting standard if Islamic banks are to enhance their image and reputation globally, as well as to remain competitive.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing debate on CSR in ethical perspective and key underlying issues associated with the emergence of new disclosure practices for Islamic financial institutions. Through this paper, new visibilities explored, and competing dilemmas opened up.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Denis Cormier, Marie‐Josée Ledoux and Michel Magnan

The aim of the paper is to investigate whether social disclosure and environmental disclosure have a substituting or a complementing effect in reducing information…

5787

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to investigate whether social disclosure and environmental disclosure have a substituting or a complementing effect in reducing information asymmetry between managers and stock market participants

Design/methodology/approach

This study attempts to provide a comprehensive analysis of a firm's social and environmental disclosure strategy. The authors posit that this strategy simultaneously affects information asymmetry and disclosure.

Findings

Findings suggest that social disclosure and environmental disclosure substitute each other in reducing stock market asymmetry.

Research limitations/implications

The measurement of social and environmental disclosure is based upon a coding instrument that makes some explicit assumptions about the value and relevance of information. Moreover, information asymmetry cannot be directly measured and is inferred from the behaviour of proxy variables such as share price volatility and bid‐ask spread.

Practical implications

Results suggest that social disclosure reinforces the informativeness of environmental disclosure for stock markets, even substituting for it under certain conditions. Stakeholders must assess and retain an increasing flow of information: a more efficient disclosure strategy becomes critical if firms want to convey the right picture of their CSR performance.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to explore the joint effect of social disclosure and environmental disclosure in reducing information asymmetry.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Dimaz Ramananda and Apriani Dorkas Rambu Atahau

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure by Indonesian firms on their social media and to compare…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent of voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure by Indonesian firms on their social media and to compare it with the mandatory disclosure on their annual reports.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use publicly listed Indonesian firms that are included in the SRI-KEHATI Index as the sample. Further, by using NVIVO software, the authors qualitatively analyze CSR activities disclosed on firms’ social media and annual reports with an interpretive approach.

Findings

The findings indicate that Indonesian firms still exhibit early stages of social media-based voluntary CSR disclosure. Further, issues on training, education and skill building dominate firms’ disclosure. Finally, Indonesian firms disclose less CSR information in their social media than in their annual reports, thus confirming the early stages of social media-based CSR disclosure.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size limits the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights on which CSR issues are commonly disclosed in firms’ social media. This study may also inform regulators the extent of disclosures that could be regulated in social media.

Originality/value

Social media-based CSR disclosure in developing countries is relatively understudied. Thus, this paper empirically shows the topic and intensity of CSR disclosure in social media and the comparison between this type of CSR disclosure with CSR disclosure using other media.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Prem Lal Joshi and Simon S. Gao

The purpose of this paper is to investigate multinational corporations' (MNCs) voluntary practice of including corporate social and environmental disclosure (CSED) on…

1589

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate multinational corporations' (MNCs) voluntary practice of including corporate social and environmental disclosure (CSED) on their web sites and characteristics that inspire MNCs to be more accountable in this regard.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts discrimination analysis to test six hypotheses to determine which variables influence the MNCs to post their CSED on the web sites. Data from a sample of 49 MNCs were analyzed with STATISTICA. The independent variables tested include log of total assets (size) and log of total equity (size), return on assets (profitability), debt ratio (risk), auditor (Big4 and non‐Big4), country effect (origin the USA or non‐USA) and industry effect (manufacturing versus services).

Findings

The results show that companies with a strong equity base and in a good financial condition have a propensity to voluntarily disclose more environmental information. For social disclosure, company size and the profitability discriminate the most. MNCs disclose a number of items pertaining to the two areas. These results are in line with evidence found in some prior studies.

Research limitations/implications

This study has its limitations. First, the results would be more conclusive if more companies had been included in the sample. Second, only six variables are tested and there may be scope for explaining the extent of the internet disclosure using other variables. Third, this research does not look into the quality of CSRD.

Practical implications

This study provides an empirical analysis of practices and characteristics of MNCs relating to CSRD on their web sites. The findings from this study help understand MNCs' corporate behavior in terms of CSED.

Originality/value

This study has, for the first time, included three more variables (financial risk, profitability, and country effect) to investigate the disclosure of social and environmental information by MNCs through their web sites, on which there is limited evidence.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Marc J. Epstein and Martin Freedman

The demand for social information by individual investors is supportedby the survey reported in this study. Based on the results of the 1991survey on the usefulness of…

5808

Abstract

The demand for social information by individual investors is supported by the survey reported in this study. Based on the results of the 1991 survey on the usefulness of annual reports to corporate shareholders, there appears to be a strong demand for information about product safety and quality, and about the company′s environmental activities. Furthermore, a majority of the shareholders surveyed also want the company to report on corporate ethics, employee relations and community involvement. Since there appears to be a strong demand for social information by shareholders, serious consideration should be given to requiring certain social disclosures in annual reports. Furthermore, a large minority of those surveyed would like these disclosures to be audited. It may be in the interest of the auditing profession actively to support those areas of social disclosure that it feels comfortable auditing and to develop the skills to provide such audits. If not, the profession may find itself in the position of being required to attest to something for which it has no expertise.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Shahed Imam

Corporate Social Reporting (CSR) assumes that the companies are socially conscious to discharge their social obligations for the well being of the society. Now business…

4378

Abstract

Corporate Social Reporting (CSR) assumes that the companies are socially conscious to discharge their social obligations for the well being of the society. Now business enterprises are under pressure from stakeholders to report to them, as to what extent they have been successful in protecting their interests. Thus, it is essential for them to adopt social accounting practices and report to interested parties as to what extent they have discharged the social responsibilities delegated to them. This study reveals that most of the listed companies in Bangladesh did not provide any information regarding the environment, human resources, community, and consumers in 1996‐97. Though some progressive companies disclosed some information, that information was not at all adequate in discharging social responsibilities. All the information provided by these companies was qualitative in nature and the disclosure level was very poor.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 22000