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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Margaret M. Hopkins and Diana Bilimoria

The purpose of this paper is to explore three research questions. Are there gender differences in the demonstration of emotional and social intelligence competencies? What…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore three research questions. Are there gender differences in the demonstration of emotional and social intelligence competencies? What is the relationship between emotional and social intelligence competencies and success, and does gender moderate that relationship? Are there differences between the most successful male and female leaders in their demonstration of these competencies?

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a 360‐degree instrument to measure the demonstration of emotional and social intelligence competencies by top‐level executives in one financial services organization. Annual performance and potential assessments measured the participants' success. Regression analyses and tests of mean differences were used to analyze the research questions.

Findings

The results indicated that there were no significant differences between male and female leaders in their demonstration of emotional and social intelligence competencies. The most successful men and women were also more similar than different in their competency demonstration. However, gender did moderate the relationship between the demonstration of these competencies and success. Male leaders were assessed as more successful even when the male and female leaders demonstrated an equivalent level of competencies. Finally, distinctions were found between the most successful males and females and their typical counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

A field sample from one organization limits the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

Implications for organizations and their leadership are discussed including the importance of a broad range of competencies used in assessments, the awareness of gender stereotypes and gender‐stereotypical behavior, and the acknowledgement of multiple measures of success.

Originality/value

This study highlights the moderating influence of gender between the demonstration of emotional and social intelligence competencies and success. Distinctions in competency demonstration between the most successful top‐level executives and the typical executives contribute to the literature and to leadership development practice.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Terri Summey

To explore the feasibility of utilizing the Bar-On mixed model of emotionalsocial intelligence as a framework for the competencies and traits needed for reference and

Abstract

To explore the feasibility of utilizing the Bar-On mixed model of emotionalsocial intelligence as a framework for the competencies and traits needed for reference and information services librarians. Through a survey of the literature, the author created a baseline list of competencies, which was compared and contrasted with the abilities, traits, and competencies that comprise the Bar-On model of emotionalsocial intelligence. The author conducted a pilot study with a small group (n = 10) of reference and user services librarians who took the EQ-i 2.0. The competencies and traits of reference and user services librarians identified in the literature compare favorably with those measured by the EQ-i 2.0. Overall, a majority of the participants (70%) obtained a total score on the EQ-i 2.0 in the mid or high range. Composite scales with the highest overall mean scores were decision-making and self-perception. Subscales with the highest scores included the following: impulse control, self-actualization, social responsibility, problem solving, and reality testing. As a pilot study, it was conducted using a small population of academic reference and user services librarians. Further research should be conducted utilizing a larger population of reference and user services librarians or librarians who have been recognized as exemplary in reference librarianship. The findings of this study could assist pre-service and in-service reference and user services librarians in further developing their emotionalsocial intelligence competencies and abilities by identifying areas where improvements could occur.

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Laura Guillén Ramo, Willem E. Saris and Richard E. Boyatzis

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this…

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Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this study: emotional and social competencies are positively and significantly related with job performance; and emotional and social competencies will be more successful in predicting performance than universal personality dimensions, like the Big Five personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the data of three medium‐sized Spanish organizations (n=223) that were involved in a competency management project based on emotional and social competencies. SPSS and structural modeling techniques available in the SEM program LISREL 8.51 software are used to enter the empirical analyses of the paper.

Findings

Results show that emotional competencies and personality traits are valuable predictors of job performance as measured by the nominations procedure in the study. In addition, competencies seem to be more powerful predictors of performance than global personality traits.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small.

Practical implications

The paper will provide reflective practitioners with useful conceptual and developmental handles for emotional competencies within organizations.

Originality/value

The paper helps to build a body of research that contributes to overcoming the paucity of evidence for the predictive validity of EI measures claimed by many authors.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Radha Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to determine the cross‐cultural reliability and validity of the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI‐2) in a cross‐cultural context.

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3369

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the cross‐cultural reliability and validity of the Emotional Competence Inventory (ECI‐2) in a cross‐cultural context.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a competency‐based approach to social and emotional intelligence (EI), the paper presents data on Indian managers from the manufacturing and service industries collected using self‐report and multi‐rater assessments. Factor analysis explored the latent structure of social and emotional intelligence competencies on the Indian sample. Divergent validity was assessed using a Stress Personality test. Internal reliability of the ECI‐2 was also determined for a sample of 400 Indian managers.

Findings

A two‐factor structure has emerged in the cross‐cultural context similar to the latent structure of the construct explored by the test developers of the ECI‐2. However, six items did not have significant loading. ECI‐2 has been found to have statistically significant reliability coefficient and divergent validity with Stress Personality test on the Indian sample.

Research limitations/implications

The competency‐based approach to emotional and social intelligence, with a two‐factor structure, has found empirical evidence on the managerial sample in the Indian context. Future research can test this on other professional groups. Norms can be developed for various professional groups using a competency‐based framework of EI.

Practical implications

ECI‐2 can be used with modification based on the findings for talent management, employee development, counseling and succession planning for Indian managers.

Originality/value

Cross‐cultural validation, in the Indian context, of a competency‐based framework of emotional and social intelligence and its measure is useful for researchers and practitioners and for professional and leadership development of managers.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Laura Guillén Ramo

The concept “emotional intelligence” (EI) resonates in the business world and many authors have called for more research that clearly conceptualizes it. Within the…

Abstract

The concept “emotional intelligence” (EI) resonates in the business world and many authors have called for more research that clearly conceptualizes it. Within the controversy of defining EI, the behavioral approach, defining and measuring EI in terms of competencies, has not received much attention. The aim of the present chapter is threefold: (1) to propose a new structure of emotional and social competencies that is useful within organizational settings; (2) to discuss a comprehensive model of emotional competencies within organizational contexts that includes personality, emotional and social competencies, and performance; and finally (3) to draw its implications for practitioners.

Details

Emotions in Groups, Organizations and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-655-3

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Nicholas Yoder and Alexandra Skoog-Hoffman

The need for social and emotional learning (SEL) has never been so clear. The growing understanding of its benefits has been made more evident by the stronger focus of…

Abstract

The need for social and emotional learning (SEL) has never been so clear. The growing understanding of its benefits has been made more evident by the stronger focus of state, district, and school leaders, educators, and families to leverage SEL as a strategy to promote emotional well-being, to combat systemic and interpersonal inequities, and to engage students in positive learning environments. With this urgency to use SEL practices, now is the time to ensure a focus on creating environments and experiences that promote social and emotional development and deepening understanding of the motivational factors that promote student and adult success. Motivation researchers have been studying the motivational elements – and associated interventions – that better equip youth and adults to engage in their learning environments, suggesting the importance that the two fields learn with and from each other. The introductory chapter of the volume, Motivating the SEL Field Forward Through Equity, explores the intersections and accelerators of the two fields to create optimal learning environments and experiences for all youth. Specifically, we provide a high-level overview of the two fields, including ways each field takes into account personal development in relation to context and culture. We further explore ways in which the two fields intersect, elevating the importance of understanding the role of equity and excellence in research and practice. We then focus on one approach that we believe elevates equity of voice in research – research–practice partnerships. Finally, we highlight how this volume is organized.

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Robert J. Emmerling and Richard E. Boyatzis

Continued research on the assessment and development of emotional and social intelligence competencies represents an opportunity to further both theoretical and applied…

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12763

Abstract

Purpose

Continued research on the assessment and development of emotional and social intelligence competencies represents an opportunity to further both theoretical and applied applications of behavioral science to the management of human capital. While the field has continued to expand over the preceding decades, research has often trailed application, especially as it relates to cross‐cultural validity. The purpose of this introductory essay to this special issue of CCM serves to focus on cultural issues related to applied use of competencies in diverse cultures.

Design/methodology/approach

Emotional and social intelligence competencies are defined and an overview provided for the papers that will follow, with original research linking these constructs to performance in various occupations and cultures, as well as issues related to their development.

Findings

Emotional and social intelligence competencies are found to represent a practical and theoretically coherent, reliable and valid approach to assessing and developing individuals in diverse cultures.

Research limitations/implications

As an introductory essay, the paper lays the foundation for the following articles in this special issue.

Originality/value

Although competencies are in widespread use around the world, issues related to cross‐cultural validation are seldom studied empirically. This introductory essay and subsequent articles will help clarify emotional and social competencies as a behavioral approach to applying emotional intelligence to the practical needs of organizations.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Richard E. Boyatzis

Development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires research and theory that can drive future scholarship and application. This introductory…

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34786

Abstract

Purpose

Development of competencies needed to be effective managers and leaders requires research and theory that can drive future scholarship and application. This introductory essay to this special issue of JMD seeks to focus on competencies in organizations in Europe and a broader conceptualization of emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

Competencies are defined and an overview is provided for the papers that will follow with original research on competencies, their link to performance in various occupations, and their development.

Findings

Emotional, social and cognitive intelligence competencies predict effectiveness in professional, management and leadership roles in many sectors of society. It addition, these competencies can be developed in adults.

Research limitations/implications

As an introductory essay, the paper lays the foundation for the following papers in this issue.

Practical implications

Competencies needed in order to be effective can be developed.

Originality/value

Despite widespread application, there are few published studies of the empirical link between competencies and performance. There are even fewer published studies showing that they can be developed. The special issue will add to both literatures. There is widespread confusion as to the definition of emotional intelligence; the paper offers some clarification.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Kamilah B. Legette, Elan C. Hope, Johari Harris and Charity Brown Griffin

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is critical for students' social and academic success. Students' SEL is often contingent on their teachers' social and emotional

Abstract

Social and emotional learning (SEL) is critical for students' social and academic success. Students' SEL is often contingent on their teachers' social and emotional competencies and capacities (SECC; Jennings & Greenberg, 2009; Chapter 5) and teacher preparation to facilitate SEL in classrooms (Schonert-Reichl, Kitil, & Hanson-Peterson, 2017). Concerningly, teacher training to facilitate SEL is frequently predicated on a color-evasive perspective that ignores the ways structural racism impacts the schooling experiences of racially minoritized students and associated academic and SEL outcomes (Jagers, Rivas-Drake, & Borowski, 2018; Jagers, Rivas-Drake, & Williams, 2019). In order to support SEL for students from racially minoritized communities, we assert that teachers' social and emotional competencies and capacities must incorporate a culturally responsive pedagogical approach that explicitly acknowledges and addresses issues of race and justice (Jagers et al., 2019; Ladson-Billings, 2014; Ladson-Billings & Tate, 1995). In this chapter we (1) provide an overview of culturally relevant pedagogy in relation to teacher social and emotional competencies and capacities; (2) outline existing models that support a culturally relevant approach to teacher social and emotional competencies and capacities; and (3) discuss future directions for education research, practice, and policy.

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2008

Helen W. Williams

The purpose of this paper is to focus on two research questions. First, what are the emotional and social intelligence competencies that distinguish outstanding from…

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4384

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on two research questions. First, what are the emotional and social intelligence competencies that distinguish outstanding from typical urban principals? Second, how do outstanding and typical urban principals conceptualize and adapt differently to their external organizational environment?

Design/methodology/approach

A criterion sample of 12 outstanding and eight typical principals was identified from a large Midwestern urban school district. Data from critical incident interviews and written questionnaires were collected. The quantitative and qualitative data were analyzed to identify the key characteristics that describe differences between the two performance groups.

Findings

Significant differences are found in both areas of inquiry. Outstanding principals demonstrate a broad and deep repertoire of competencies related to emotional and social intelligence. Twelve of the 20 competencies studied significantly differentiate outstanding and typical principals. In addition, the study found differences in how outstanding and typical principals conceptualize and adapt to their external organizational environment. Outstanding principals interact with a broader range of external groups and utilize a wider spectrum of boundary‐spanning strategies.

Research limitations/implications

A field sample from one urban school district limits the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

Usefulness of the findings for school districts and universities is explored including the implications of a competency assessment and development approach for the recruitment, selection and preparation of principal candidates as well as leadership training for incumbent principals.

Originality/value

This study suggests that emotional and social intelligence is a critical factor in effective principal performance and is an important framework to examine in future research. The study provides a methodology that can be easily replicated in other urban districts.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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