Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Xiaogang Chen, Shu Li, Libo Su and Ting Huang

This study aims to reveal the decision-making process that micro and small merchants (MSMs) may go through when deciding on the mobile payment system (MPS) adoption and

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reveal the decision-making process that micro and small merchants (MSMs) may go through when deciding on the mobile payment system (MPS) adoption and usage and explore how relevant factors may impact this process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the grounded theory approach. Specifically, this paper conducts individual, semi-structured interviews with MSMs in China. Each interview was focused on an MSM’s decisions on initial adoption and continued use of MPSs. The paper then coded the interviews to derive conceptual categories and integrated the categories to form a cohesive framework to explain how MSMs make decisions on MPS adoption and usage.

Findings

MSMs make decisions on MPS adoption and usage in three phases: first, due to variations in social and economic surroundings, some merchants develop intentions to adopt MPSs, whereas others do not. Second, merchants developing adoption intentions in phase one have to select which MPS brands to adopt and then begin using them. The brand value affects their selection. Finally, the use of MPSs of their initial choice has consequences for business operations. Merchants with different levels of personal innovativeness evaluate the consequences differently. Satisfied merchants continue using the initial MPSs, while dissatisfied merchants switch to other brands.

Originality/value

The findings first give a more complete depiction of how MSMs make MPS adoption and usage decisions; second show that MSMs’ MPS adoption intention is solely influenced by pro-mobile-payment surroundings and explain what constitutes pro-mobile-payment surroundings and through what mechanisms the surroundings influence adoption intentions; third reveals that selecting which MPS brand to adopt is an important decision phase; fourth explain both why merchants may continue using MPSs and why they may switch from one MPS brand to another.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Özlem Tuna

Social capital (SC), emerging as a new type of capital with 1980s, is defined as resources such as knowledge, opportunities, power, goodwill, and cooperation, achieved by…

Abstract

Social capital (SC), emerging as a new type of capital with 1980s, is defined as resources such as knowledge, opportunities, power, goodwill, and cooperation, achieved by means of interpersonal relationships. Businesses in possession of these resources will clearly gain an economic competitive advantage. This study was designed to determine how SC affects survival skills of businesses in economic competition. In this study, where qualitative research methods were used, data were obtained through semi-structured interviews with 40 micro- and small business owners, most of whom are second and third generations, operating in Antakya Long Bazaar, and three managers in charge of the management of Long Bazaar. Interviews were recorded with a voice recorder and note-taking technique. After transcription of voice recordings, the researchers coded and categorized the raw data and obtained themes and subthemes. Obtained data were analyzed with MAXQDA 20 software. In line with the performed qualitative analysis, responses of owner-managers were categorized in trust, trust promoting mechanisms (establishments, norms, and sanctions), network participation, collective action and cooperation, and learning aspects of SC. Questions on identification of variables and structural characteristics, which are prominent in determination of SC, were addressed to managers in charge of the management of Long Bazaar, thereby revealing the situation pertaining to the general structure.

Details

New Challenges for Future Sustainability and Wellbeing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-969-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2020

Stefano Amato, Rodrigo Basco, Silvia Gómez Ansón and Nicola Lattanzi

This study investigates the relationship between family-managed firms and firm employment growth by considering the effects of location and economic crisis as moderating variables.

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the relationship between family-managed firms and firm employment growth by considering the effects of location and economic crisis as moderating variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses random-effect models on a large panel dataset of Spanish manufacturing firms covering 2003 to 2015 to estimate the joint effects of municipality size and economic crisis on firm employment growth.

Findings

The analysis reveals a positive association between family-managed firms and employment growth. However, this association is not uniform across space and time. When it considers location, the study finds that municipality size positively affects employment growth in family-managed firms but not in non-family firms. Additionally, while the study reveals that both firm types experience negative employment growth during the early stage of the global economic crisis (2007–08), it also finds that family-managed firms located in small municipalities downsize less than their non-family counterparts.

Originality/value

This study provides new evidence on the resilience of family-managed firms during economic crises, particularly those located in geographically bounded settings, such as small municipalities. When an adverse event, such as an economic crisis, jeopardizes employment levels, the embedded and trust-based relationships, between a family firm and its community leads them to prioritize employees' claims. However, family-managed firms' commitment to preserve jobs in small municipalities cannot be maintained over the long term; this effect disappears if the economic crisis is protracted. This study sheds new light on family-managed firms' distinctive behavior toward with local communities.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Teppo Eskelinen and Juhana Venäläinen

This paper explores economic moralities in self-organised alternative economies and argues that the diverse economies approach is particularly useful in elaborating the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores economic moralities in self-organised alternative economies and argues that the diverse economies approach is particularly useful in elaborating the self-understandings of such economic communities. The analysis focuses on two types of alternative economies in Finland: ridesharing and timebanking.

Design/methodology/approach

Through qualitative data, the paper looks into moments of negotiation where economic moralities of self-organised alternative economies are explicitly debated. The main research data consists of social media conversations, supplemented by a member survey for the participants of the studied timebank. The data are analysed through theory-guided qualitative content analysis.

Findings

The analysis shows that the moments of negotiation within alternative economies should not be understood as simple collisions of mutually exclusive ideas, but rather as complex processes of balancing between overlapping and partly incommensurable economic moralities. While self-organised alternative economies might appear as functionally uniform at the level of their everyday operations, they still provide considerable leeway for different conceptions of the underlying normative commitments.

Originality/value

To date, there is little qualitative research on how the participants of self-organised alternative economies reflect the purpose and ethics of these practices. This study contributes to the body of diverse economies research by analysing novel case studies in the Finnish context. Through empirical analysis, this paper also provides a theoretical framework of how the different economic moralities in self-organised alternative economies can be mapped.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 December 2010

Mónica Arroyo-Vázquez, Peter van der Sijde and Fernando Jiménez-Sáez

The so-called ‘Third Mission’ of the university is under debate for the last 20–30 years (Laredo, 2007) and this mission has received a wide variety of interpretations. In…

Abstract

The so-called ‘Third Mission’ of the university is under debate for the last 20–30 years (Laredo, 2007) and this mission has received a wide variety of interpretations. In this chapter we adhere to execution of activities that contribute to the economic and social development of its territory. This new idea of the university as an entrepreneurial one requires a reorientation of its strategy to cope with the challenges imposed by its new task towards society. In this sense, the Entrepreneurship Support Programmes (ESPs), as university services, are a central element in the fulfilment of the aims and objectives of any entrepreneurial university, as those that combine and integrate the traditional activities of education and research with the contribution to the economic and social development (Etzkowitz, 1998; Goddard, 1998). The ESP services consist, for example, of programmes that promote entrepreneurship in all the fields; they support the creation of new innovative companies with a scientific or technologic base; they support the development of university spin-off and training related to the creation and management of companies; and they promote university–company relationship and interaction between other factors (Arroyo-Vázquez & van der Sijde, 2008). The reorientation of the strategy of the university into an entrepreneurial one involves also a strategy with regard to the university's ‘entrepreneurial’ services, which have to adapt to the new demands and needs of the university's ‘new’ users, entrepreneurs and companies as well as university staff members.

Details

New Technology-Based Firms in the New Millennium
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-374-4

Abstract

Details

Appearance as Capital
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-711-1

Book part
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Jacob Torfing and Tina Øllgaard Bentzen

Denmark is characterised by high levels of trust between citizens and public authorities as well as between public leaders and employees, providing a comparative advantage…

Abstract

Denmark is characterised by high levels of trust between citizens and public authorities as well as between public leaders and employees, providing a comparative advantage when it comes to expanding public welfare, enhancing economic performance and handling a crisis like COVID-19. Public governance, however, requires a delicate balance between trust and the legitimate need for control to secure accountability This chapter explains how the high levels of trust in the Danish public sector are wedded to a pragmatic combination of various public governance paradigms, which has produced a ‘hybrid governance system’ balancing the legitimate demand for control with widespread trust in public employees. Traditional Weberian bureaucratic values of regularity, impartiality and expertise are combined with a limited and selective introduction of New Public Management reforms. Simultaneously, a dynamic neo-Weberian state works to satisfy an increasingly demanding citizenry while new platforms for developing collaborative solutions to complex problems are designed and developed at the municipal level. This hybrid governance system produces a virtuous circle of trust sustained by trust-based systems of evaluation, assessment and accountability developed in close dialogue between public managers and employees. The chapter demonstrates how a long-lasting political-administrative culture based on trust and a pragmatic, non-ideological combination of different governance paradigms has generated a positive trust‒public governance feedback loop. Striking the right control‒trust balance remains a continual challenge, however, to avoid governance failures eroding citizen trust in the public sector and to safeguard public values of transparency, accountability and performance.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Guru Prakash Prabhakar

1159

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Raj Kumar Kothari and Priyanka Bhaduri

In the post-9/11 period, tackling the vertical and horizontal growth of international terrorism has become a major challenge for the international community, more…

Abstract

In the post-9/11 period, tackling the vertical and horizontal growth of international terrorism has become a major challenge for the international community, more pertinently for the liberal states. About three decades ago, Paul Wilkinson wrote a book entitled Terrorism and the Liberal State in which he made a hypothetical statement that the liberal states in today’s world were more vulnerable to terrorist attacks and threats than any other political system. Totalitarian societies do not provide any space to terrorism in view of the fact that this system does not recognize the importance of civil societies. However, the point to be noted is that in today’s globalized international order, terrorist activities are not only confined within the territory of liberal societies alone, rather it has engulfed many parts of the globe that includes non-liberal societies as well. Therefore, strengthening democratic regimes and values is not the solution to abolish terrorism. In this context, this chapter attempts to test Wilkinson’s propositions that liberal states are more vulnerable to terrorism than any other political system by making a comparative study between democratic and non-democratic regimes to identify the recent trends of terrorism.

Details

The Impact of Global Terrorism on Economic and Political Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-919-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Harry Gray

We all tend to think of older people as being about 15 years older than we are – whatever our age is – and yet it is now generally true that old people are a lot younger…

1077

Abstract

We all tend to think of older people as being about 15 years older than we are – whatever our age is – and yet it is now generally true that old people are a lot younger than they ever were. This means that almost everything that has been said and written about – for example – the over 50s no longer applies. Because of the demographic changes that are increasing healthy longevity, there has to be a reappraisal of the nature of work and the organization of employment, but unhappily there is little sign of this either on the part of governments or HRD managers and there has been little lead from the UK Employers Forum on Age which was supposed to address these issues.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000