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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

H. Dahles, J.K. Verduyn and I.A.M. Wakkee

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Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2011

Tuuli Pärenson

The aim of this paper is to determine the criteria for a solid impact evaluation in social entrepreneurship. The solid impact evaluation method is needed for building the…

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2877

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the criteria for a solid impact evaluation in social entrepreneurship. The solid impact evaluation method is needed for building the bridge between two separate discourses of social entrepreneurship: the discourses of protectionists of social entrepreneurship, who believe without empirical proof that social enterprises are effective and the opponents or doubters in social entrepreneurship, who need empirical proof of the effectiveness of social enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The criteria for a solid impact evaluation discourse of social entrepreneurship are determined and its impact evaluation is analysed based on literature.

Findings

A solid social impact evaluation method should be able to analyse: the social impact of the organisation and not only the financial allocation and outcome; differences in the impact of two organisations which are operating in the same field; and the selection of target group and analysis of all the impacts of the activities.

Research limitations/implications

The list of criteria for a solid impact evaluation might not be complete as it is based on literature review only. As there is a considerable gap between the discourse of protectionists and opponents of social entrepreneurship, additional analyses are required to analyse the discourse of practitioners of social entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

The current study could be used for practitioners as well as for politicians while preparation for the negotiations with the representatives with other sectors as it brings out some of the common topics that are misunderstood by different parties.

Originality/value

This paper takes the first step toward a construction of a solid impact evaluation model. Evaluating the social impact of social enterprises with a solid model could bring closer the discourses of social enterprises used by protectionists and opponents of social entrepreneurship.

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Society and Business Review, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Nadiya Parekh and Laurence Attuel-Mendès

Social entrepreneurship is gaining increased attention from academia and practitioners worldwide. Owing to its financing challenges, academic pedagogies are seeking…

Abstract

Purpose

Social entrepreneurship is gaining increased attention from academia and practitioners worldwide. Owing to its financing challenges, academic pedagogies are seeking methods to strengthen the social financing dimension of this emerging discipline. This paper bridges the gap in social entrepreneurship education by portraying diverse perspectives on this topic from multiple actors in two cross-cultural contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case analysis was conducted to explore financing aspects of social entrepreneurship in France and the United States. The authors interviewed academicians and practitioners to learn about their current experiments and thoughts on integrating finance into the curriculum for social entrepreneurship.

Findings

The authors found multiple facets of the social entrepreneurship finance construct, focused not only on specific financial skills but also on a general approach to venture designs. Multidisciplinary knowledge is sought not just on the topic of finance but also in other disciplines that can broaden its scope of financing to a larger investor domain. While in France, this came out as a need for integrating the financial communication skills to personify the social value creation process; in the US, it was pointed out as the need for having a contractual knowledge to differentiate investment opportunities and comprehend their risks levels.

Originality/value

By bringing perspectives from multiple actors who have had experience in social entrepreneurship financing in regions with the fastest development, this paper is seminal in bridging the financing skill gaps that exist in social entrepreneurship discipline. The main theoretical contribution of this article concerns the skills, financial and otherwise that are useful in social finance.

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International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2011

G.T. Lumpkin and Jerome A. Katz

From its earliest incarnations, entrepreneurship has been linked to innovation, and often innovations with a societal or social impact. Although classical economists…

Abstract

From its earliest incarnations, entrepreneurship has been linked to innovation, and often innovations with a societal or social impact. Although classical economists discussed the role entrepreneurs play in handling risk in an economy (Hébert & Link, 2009), perhaps the greater risks have been the social impacts which entrepreneurship brought to societies (Drucker, 1985). The power of mercantile economies like the Phoenician or two thousand years later the British came as much from the new ideas and processes they introduced to the societies of trading partners as from the goods traded.

Details

Social and Sustainable Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-073-5

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Nur Azreen Zulkefly, Norjihan Abdul Ghani, Christie Pei-Yee Chin, Suraya Hamid and Nor Aniza Abdullah

Predicting the impact of social entrepreneurship is crucial as it can help social entrepreneurs to determine the achievement of their social mission and performance…

Abstract

Purpose

Predicting the impact of social entrepreneurship is crucial as it can help social entrepreneurs to determine the achievement of their social mission and performance. However, there is a lack of existing social entrepreneurship models to predict social enterprises' social impacts. This paper aims to propose the social impact prediction model for social entrepreneurs using a data analytic approach.

Design/methodology/approach

This study implemented an experimental method using three different algorithms: naive Bayes, k-nearest neighbor and J48 decision tree algorithms to develop and test the social impact prediction model.

Findings

The accurate result of the developed social impact prediction model is based on the list of identified social impact prediction variables that have been evaluated by social entrepreneurship experts. Based on the three algorithms' implementation of the model, the results showed that naive Bayes is the best performance classifier for social impact prediction accuracy.

Research limitations/implications

Although there are three categories of social entrepreneurship impact, this research only focuses on social impact. There will be a bright future of social entrepreneurship if the research can focus on all three social entrepreneurship categories. Future research in this area could look beyond these three categories of social entrepreneurship, so the prediction of social impact will be broader. The prospective researcher also can look beyond the difference and similarities of economic, social impacts and environmental impacts and study the overall perspective on those impacts.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills the need for the Malaysian social entrepreneurship blueprint to design the social impact in social entrepreneurship. There are none of the prediction models that can be used in predicting social impact in Malaysia. This study also contributes to social entrepreneur researchers, as the new social impact prediction variables found can be used in predicting social impact in social entrepreneurship in the future, which may lead to the significance of the prediction performance.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

José Carlos Vázquez-Parra, Juan Alberto Amézquita-Zamora and María Soledad Ramírez-Montoya

The objective of the study was to analyze the perception of knowledge and experience development in social entrepreneurship in students of a university certified by Ashoka…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the study was to analyze the perception of knowledge and experience development in social entrepreneurship in students of a university certified by Ashoka as a Changemaker campus and to identify data that argue for equitable training among all students regardless of gender and discipline studied.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors evaluated the perception of knowledge about social entrepreneurship of a group of students from a university certified as Ashoka Changemaker Campus to check if there are differences by gender and disciplinary area. The population was 140 students, to whom a validated instrument was applied.

Findings

The results shed light on the few differences among students in the business, engineering and health sciences disciplines compared to those enrolled in the humanities and social sciences concerning knowledge and experience in social entrepreneurship. The findings also indicate gender equality in the perception of knowledge and experience of innovation and social entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size in the different disciplinary areas is a limitation of this research. However, the findings are valuable in terms of gender and the study being conducted in the first university certified as a Changemaker Campus in Latin America.

Practical implications

Underlying the statistics and the hypotheses is important in improving students' experience and expanding their equitable opportunities to learn about and implement innovative proposals for social entrepreneurship projects.

Social implications

Training in equality and inclusion contributes to an equitable and socially just society, especially when this training aims to bring new possibilities to society. This study links with those that have been conducted in other institutions, where conscious efforts have been made to reduce the gender gap or differences by disciplinary area when undertaking social entrepreneurship projects that connect sectors for social benefit. This research also argues for the need to identify the impact of other cultural elements, in addition to the knowledge provided by universities, that reduce the gap among their students.

Originality/value

This study is original because of its hypotheses about university students' social entrepreneurship projects, being conducted in a special environment (Ashoka Changemaker campus) in Latin America. The data were analyzed under hypothesis testing, contrasting the empirical evidence with the theoretical assumptions.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Paul Alexander Pounder

This study aims to provide insights into the conceptualization of social entrepreneurship and the extent to which culture affects it.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights into the conceptualization of social entrepreneurship and the extent to which culture affects it.

Design/methodology/approach

First, social entrepreneurship is conceptualized and then the research integrates Hofstede’s framework, with some consideration for Inglehart’s and Schwartz’s framework in exploring the effects of cultural values.

Findings

Seminal studies on social entrepreneurship delineated acting entrepreneurially and having a social mission but failed to consider cultural contextualization. After illustrating Hofstede’s, Inglehart’s and Schwartz’s frameworks for cultural dimensions, the research shows that different cultural dimensions can provide a better understanding of social entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a limited scope as it relies on narrow conceptualizations of social entrepreneurship and culture.

Practical implications

Future national agendas should embrace varying notions of shared obligation across support institutions and enterprises as they attempt to address social problems across differing cultures.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature by providing an insightful understanding of the influence of culture on social entrepreneurship through integrating widely used cultural dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2019

Seyedali Ahrari, Steven Eric Krauss, Zaifunizam Ariffin and Lee Kwan Meng

Recent interest in social entrepreneurship among young people has led to a heightened interest in new research. Few studies, however, have yet to investigate motivators of…

Abstract

Recent interest in social entrepreneurship among young people has led to a heightened interest in new research. Few studies, however, have yet to investigate motivators of involvement, particularly from countries that are new to social entrepreneurship. The current study set out to better understand this phenomenon among young social entrepreneurs in Malaysia. In-depth one-to-one interviews with 12 young entrepreneurs were carried out to collect the data. Four themes and ten sub-themes emerged from the interviews, including early life experience (childhood experience and family experience), inspiration from clients and colleagues (interactions with the target group and exposure to social entrepreneurs), work-related experience (volunteer experience and job-related experience), and personal meaning (contribute back to society, desire for more meaning in life, and personal passions). The implications for policy-makers and interested parties are outlined in regard to enhancing participation and interest among youth for social entrepreneurship.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2011

Neil Thompson, Kip Kiefer and Jeffrey G. York

In this chapter, we review and examine the differences and similarities between social, sustainable, and environmental entrepreneurship. We explore the concepts, key…

Abstract

In this chapter, we review and examine the differences and similarities between social, sustainable, and environmental entrepreneurship. We explore the concepts, key questions, empirical methodologies, and disciplinary roots that differentiate and relate these emergent interest areas. The result of this comparative analysis inevitably raises the question of whether these new literature streams are inclusive or separate from the traditional domain of entrepreneurship research. We find that these three areas share many similarities, yet are distinguishable from one another and from more traditional, commercial forms of entrepreneurship. However, we determine that although these three areas of entrepreneurial scholarship raise unique questions and highlight different types of phenomena, they are not their own fields of study, but rather promising contexts for studying key questions of the entrepreneurship field.

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Book part
Publication date: 31 July 2014

David Gras, Todd W. Moss and G. T. Lumpkin

The purpose of this study is to assess the current prevalence of empirical research in the field of social entrepreneurship. Further, we identify secondary datasets and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the current prevalence of empirical research in the field of social entrepreneurship. Further, we identify secondary datasets and explain their relative strengths and weaknesses for use by social entrepreneurship scholars.

Methods

The authors conducted a search of academic articles in the EBSCO and ProQuest databases mentioning social entrepreneurship, social venture(s), social enterprise(s), or social entrepreneur(s) in the title, abstract, or keywords published from 2009 to 2013. Papers were coded and analyzed based upon the nature of their methods.

Findings

We find that while qualitative studies are still the norm, quantitative methods are increasing, thanks to the creation of large-scale datasets and the use of analysis techniques new to the field. Three such large-scale datasets – the PSED II, GEM, and nonprofit tax collections – are discussed in depth. We find several strengths and weaknesses for each dataset, yet each provides social entrepreneurship scholars with fruitful opportunities.

Value of chapter

Through a deeper understanding of empirical research and sources of social entrepreneurship data, scholars may be more attracted to social entrepreneurship, better equipped to conduct high-quality research and publish in high-quality outlets. Moreover, by moving beyond case studies and small-sample research to engaging larger pools of subjects and producing more generalizable findings, social entrepreneurship scholars will have the ability to impact a much broader scope of practitioners.

Details

Social Entrepreneurship and Research Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-141-1

Keywords

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