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Article
Publication date: 5 December 2017

Sheshadri Chatterjee and Arpan Kumar Kar

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effects of successful adoption of information technology (IT)-enabled services to be provided in the proposed smart cities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the effects of successful adoption of information technology (IT)-enabled services to be provided in the proposed smart cities of India from end-user-experience perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper has taken a sincere endeavor to understand to what extent the success of the smart cities depends on the users’ experience of the IT-enabled services, the backbone of smart cities, and how using IT-enabled services can improve the quality of the users’ lifestyle. Initially, few hypotheses have been developed from literature review, followed by structured questionnaires. Once the data were collected, they were analyzed using different statistical tools. This paper will be useful for the policymakers, specifically those who are involved in technology and IT-governance-related areas, in policymaking for the proposed smart cities in India.

Findings

This study tries to find how the IT-enabled services would transform the lives of residents both socially and technologically; to what extent the prospective citizens will be engaged to use the modern services; to what extent the threat of privacy and security issues affects the overall performance of the proposed smart cities of India; and how gaining trust of the citizens could help in successful adoption of IT services. This paper tries to find out few of these questions from the city residents’ perspective.

Research limitations/implications

This study is undertaken keeping Indian smart cities in perspective. However, in India, the proposed smart cities are in different states. In fact, the respondents selected by the authors are not the true representatives of the whole population, which is spread covering all parts of India. This paper could have implications for policymakers in drafting the smart city policy in India especially from IT-governance and user-experience perspective.

Practical implications

As this study discusses proposed smart cities of India from IT-enabled services and from the citizens’ perspective, it will have a huge practical implication once these smart cities become operational in India.

Social implications

This study discusses the IT-enabled services expected to be provided to the citizens of the proposed smart cities of India. As the paper discusses about the citizens’ perspective and the proposed smart cities of India, it definitely has social implications especially since the study is related to the citizens of proposed smart cities of India.

Originality/value

The research reported in this manuscript is the outcome of in-depth study on proposed Indian smart cities especially from IT adoption and from users’ perspective. Very few studies have been carried out on proposed Indian smart cities from IT adoption perspective and how that could improve the lifestyle of the residents.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Ignasi Capdevila and Matías I. Zarlenga

In recent years, the term “smart city” has attracted a lot of attention from policy makers, business leaders and citizenship in general. Although there is not a unique…

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Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, the term “smart city” has attracted a lot of attention from policy makers, business leaders and citizenship in general. Although there is not a unique definition of what a smart city is, it is generally accepted that “smart” urban policies refer to local governments’ initiatives that use information and communication technologies in order to increase the quality of life of their inhabitants while contributing to a sustainable development. So far, “smart city” approaches have generally been related to top-down processes of technology diffusion. The purpose of this paper is to present a broader view on “smart” initiatives to analyze both top-down and bottom-up dynamics in a smart city. The authors argue that these two perspectives are complementary and its combination can reinforce the collaboration between different city stakeholders. Top-down and bottom-up initiatives are not opposed forces but, on the contrary, can have a synergistic effect on the innovation capacity of the city. Both perspectives are illustrated by providing examples of different “smart” aspects in the city of Barcelona: smart districts, open collaborative spaces, infrastructures and open data.

Design/methodology/approach

To illustrate the arguments, the authors analyze the case of the city of Barcelona providing examples of top-down and bottom-up initiatives in four different smart city aspects: smart districts, open collaborative spaces, infrastructures and open data. The research method is based on a case study (Yin, 1984). The primary data consisted on interviews to city council representatives as well as managers of local public institutions, like economic development offices, and local organizations like for instance coworking spaces. The authors interviewed also specialists on the innovation history of the city in order to validate the data. In addition, the authors used secondary data such as reports on the 22@, and documentation on the Barcelona innovation policies, as well as doing a compilation of press articles and the online content of the institutional webpages. All together, the authors have followed a data triangulation strategy to seek data validation based on the cross-verification of the analyzed data sources.

Findings

The analysis suggests that the top-down and bottom-up perspectives are complementary and their combination can reinforce the collaboration between different city stakeholders. Top-down and bottom-up initiatives are not opposed forces but, on the contrary, can have a synergistic effect on the innovation capacity of the city. Both perspectives are illustrated by providing examples of different “smart” aspects in the city of Barcelona: smart districts, open collaborative spaces, infrastructures and open data.

Research limitations/implications

Nevertheless, the analysis has its limitations. Even if the authors have emphasized the importance of the bottom-up initiatives, citizens do not have often the resources to act without governmental intervention. This is the case of services that require high-cost infrastructures or regulatory changes. Also, as it usually happens in the case of disruptive technology, it is hard for citizens to understand the possibilities of its use. In these cases, firms and institutions must play an important role in the first phases of the diffusion of innovations, by informing and incentivizing its use. It is also important to note that some of the emerging usages of technology are confronted to legal or regulatory issues. For instance, distributed and shared Wi-Fi networks might be in opposition to economic interests of internet providers, that often difficult its expansion. It is also the case of services of the sharing economy that represent a menace to established institutions (like the tensions between Uber and taxi companies, or Airbnb and hotels). In these cases, city halls like it is the case in Barcelona, tend to respond to these emergent uses of technology by regulating to ensure protection to existing corporate services.

Practical implications

In conclusion, the transformational process that leads a city to become a smart city has to take in consideration the complexity and the plurality of the urban reality. Beyond considering citizens as being users, testers or consumers of technology, local administrations that are able to identify, nourish and integrate the emerging citizens’ initiatives would contribute to the reinforcement of a smart city reality.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper is to go beyond the generalized technologic discourse around smart cities by adding the layer of the citizens’ initiatives.

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2022

Zhaoyu Chen and Irene Cheng Chu Chan

This study examined a tourism destination, Macao, a fast-progressing smart city under development, vis-à-vis a set of smart city quality of life (SCQOL) domains and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined a tourism destination, Macao, a fast-progressing smart city under development, vis-à-vis a set of smart city quality of life (SCQOL) domains and verified their effects on citizens' attitudes, perceptions and support for citizen-centric smart city development (SCD).

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a quantitative approach. In particular, a questionnaire survey was used to collect data from Macao citizens. Factor analysis was used to identify SCQOL domains, while multiple linear regression and cluster analysis were used to achieve the research objectives.

Findings

This study identified five SCQOL domains: smart environment, smart people, smart livelihood, smart economy and economic policy, and smart mobility. Each of the domains had a different influence on citizens' attitudes and support for SCD. Three citizen segments (passive, neutral and enthusiastic supporters) were identified.

Practical implications

The five SCQOL domains, their effects on citizens' support for SCD and the three citizen segments identified can help implement the appropriate measures to enhance the target groups' SCD. The findings are also of practical value in evaluating the citizen-centric approaches on smart progress in other contexts.

Originality/value

The concept of smart technology has been widely applied to all aspects of city development. The main goal of SCD is to enhance citizens' quality of life. However, most studies have only explored smart cities and quality of life in isolation. Grounded on citizen centrality, this study contributes to the literature on SCD by proposing a new concept of SCQOL, identifying the domains constituting SCQOL and their influence on citizens' support for SCD.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Abstract

Details

Smart Cities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-613-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Sandra Cohen and Sotirios Karatzimas

This study examines the reporting practices of a sample of awarded smart cities that report in English by analyzing the financial and non-financial reports published in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the reporting practices of a sample of awarded smart cities that report in English by analyzing the financial and non-financial reports published in their websites.

Design/methodology/approach

The study performs a manifest content analysis on the financial and non-financial reports published by a sample of awarded – by various networks and organizations – smart cities. Integrated Popular Reporting that builds on Integrated Reporting, Popular Reporting and ICT advancements is used as the reference paradigm to analyze the content and the characteristics of these reports.

Findings

The results indicate that smart cities' reports are mainly developed conventionally and do not embed technological advancements. However, there are several smart cities that adopt a reporting paradigm where the five capitals of Integrated Reporting, over and above the financial one, are discussed.

Originality/value

Systematizing the way the existing reports of smart cities are developed provides evidence whether smart cities adopt reporting means that are consistent with their character, as well as, the specific areas they should focus to achieve that. Toward this end, collaborations between citizens and smart city councils, in the philosophy of co-production and co-creation of public value, could prove helpful in the development of useful reports.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Rob Kitchin, Paolo Cardullo and Cesare Di Feliciantonio

This chapter provides an introduction to the smart city and engages with its idea and ideals from a critical social science perspective. After setting out in brief the…

Abstract

This chapter provides an introduction to the smart city and engages with its idea and ideals from a critical social science perspective. After setting out in brief the emergence of smart cities and current key debates, we note a number of practical, political, and normative questions relating to citizenship, social justice, and the public good that warrant examination. The remainder of the chapter provides an initial framing for engaging with these questions. The first section details the dominant neoliberal conception and enactment of smart cities and how this works to promote the interests of capital and state power and reshape governmentality. We then detail some of the more troubling ethical issues associated with smart city technologies and initiatives. Having set out some of the more troubling aspects of how social relations are produced within smart cities, we then examine how citizens and citizenship have been conceived and operationalized in the smart city to date. We then follow this with a discussion of social justice and the smart city. In the fifth section, we explore the notion of the “right to the smart city” and how this might be used to recast the smart city in emancipatory and empowering ways. Finally, we set out how the book seeks to answer our questions and extend our initial framing, exploring the extent to which the “right to the city” should be a fundamental principle of smart city endeavors.

Details

The Right to the Smart City
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-140-7

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Ramon Ribera-Fumaz

This chapter explores if alternative participatory co-creation approaches have the potential for deploying an emancipatory urbanism that is able to contest the urban…

Abstract

This chapter explores if alternative participatory co-creation approaches have the potential for deploying an emancipatory urbanism that is able to contest the urban dynamics of (digital) capitalism. It does so by focusing on the Barcelona case. Barcelona fully embraced a “smart citizen” approach in 2011 to become a European referent in smart urban strategies. However, in 2015, with the arrival of a new municipal government, Barcelona has situated itself contesting the “smart city” and at the forefront of alternative possibilities with its “technological sovereignty” strategy. This shift aims to remake the smart city agenda for citizens through the advancement of the right to information and guarantees to open, transparent, and participatory decision-making through new digital and platform technologies. The chapter argues, first, that “technological sovereignty” has been instrumental in re-politicizing the notions of (smart) citizenship and technology, deploying initiatives aimed at regaining public control on data and citizens participating in policy-making. Second, Barcelona’s technological sovereignty strategy, though framed as locally and bottom-up, is based on a global comprehension and diagnosis of the global dynamics of digital capitalism. However, sometimes, there still remains an over-optimistic stance concerning digital technology. Thus, for any alternative to the neoliberal smart city, it is necessary to decenter the debate from the technologies themselves or the local, and recognize that any emancipatory strategy is also about acknowledging that technology-led solutions are not autonomous of broader relations of production and complex political economy geographies.

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Manuel Pedro Rodríguez Bolívar

This paper is framed under the relevance of collaborative governance models in smart cities that are members of the EUROCITIES network and are involved in a working group…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is framed under the relevance of collaborative governance models in smart cities that are members of the EUROCITIES network and are involved in a working group about “creative citizenship” and seeks to analyse the use of new technologies by city governments in smart cities with the aim at improving e-participation of the citizenry in the public arena. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on two data collection methods. First, this paper performs an e-survey sent to leading European smart cities about the relevance of collaborative governance in strategies of cities, about the main pillars and outcomes of smart governance and about the model of participation in developing a smart city. Second, an examination of 47 local governments of smart cities included in the working group of “creative citizenship” in the EUROCITIES network is performed during March 2017 with the specific purpose of collecting data about smart technologies used for e-participation.

Findings

Sample smart cities believe that collaborative governance is necessary to be implemented in public sector management under the smart environment but less than 50 per cent of them have created citizen participation platforms to promote citizen involvement in public affairs and only a few of them promote online public consultations, discussions and petitions. Also, there are differences in perceptions and in e-participation tools used by sample smart cities in accordance with the administrative culture of the country in which these cities are located.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to fill the gap in the analysis of the relevance of collaborative governance models in smart cities and the use in these cities of transparency websites, open data projects or e-participation platforms to promote citizen involvement in the public affairs of the city.

Propósito

Este artículo se enmarca dentro del estudio de los modelos de gobernanza colaborativa en las ciudades inteligentes y analiza aquéllas que son miembros de la red EUROCITIES y, además, participan en un grupo de trabajo sobre "ciudadanía creativa", buscando analizar el uso de las nuevas tecnologías por parte de los gobiernos de estas ciudades inteligentes con el objetivo de mejorar la e-participación pública.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Esta investigación se basa en dos métodos de recopilación de datos. En primer lugar, este documento realiza una encuesta electrónica enviada a las principales ciudades inteligentes europeas sobre: a) la relevancia de la gobernanza colaborativa en las estrategias de las ciudades; b) los principales fundamentos y resultados de la gobernanza inteligente; y c) el modelo de participación en el desarrollo de una ciudad inteligente. En segundo lugar, este trabajo realiza, a fecha de mayo de 2017, un análisis de las nuevas tecnologías utilizadas por 47 gobiernos locales de estas ciudades inteligentes (aquéllas incluidas en el grupo de trabajo de "ciudadanía creativa" en la red EUROCITIES) para facilitar la participación electrónica de la ciudadanía.

Hallazgos

Las ciudades inteligentes de muestra creen que la gobernanza colaborativa debe ser implementada en la gestión de la ciudad inteligente, pero menos del 50% han creado plataformas de e-participación ciudadana para promover la involucración de la ciudadanía en los asuntos públicos, y sólo unas pocas de estas ciudades promueven el desarrollo de consultas, discusiones y peticiones online. Además, un análisis realizado por culturas administrativas destaca la existencia de diferencias entre las percepciones obtenidas de los gestores de las ciudades inteligentes de la muestra y las herramientas que estas ciudades utilizan para fomentar la e-participación pública.

Originalidad/valour

Este documento contribuye a llenar el vacío en la investigación sobre el análisis de la relevancia de los modelos de gobernanza colaborativa en ciudades inteligentes y el uso de web de transparencia, de datos abiertos o de plataformas de participación electrónica para promover la participación ciudadana en los asuntos públicos dentro de estas ciudades.

Details

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1012-8255

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Article
Publication date: 14 February 2018

Luca Dezi, Paola Pisano, Marco Pironti and Armando Papa

The purpose of this paper is to satisfy a clear gap in the main field of open innovation research whereabouts a very little scholarship try to analyze the mechanisms of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to satisfy a clear gap in the main field of open innovation research whereabouts a very little scholarship try to analyze the mechanisms of innovative milieu down smart cities environments by applying through innovative projects that seem to support efficiently the entry of private firms and citizens in public collaborations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research performed an exploratory and qualitative evaluation based on the case study method built on the evaluation of organizational behavior and urban boosting innovation through smart city initiatives. In doing so, after a literature review in smart city as well in lean methodology fields, the case of Turin Smart City follows.

Findings

As acknowledged by international literature, the paper shows how a lean approach enables local government to define and realize smart projects and initiatives in a faster and more effective way. Particularly, the government in one of the main cities in Italy, id est Turin, combines a lean methodology with the job-to-be done approach, according a new concept of smart initiatives involving a startup mentality for the lead users which enables interesting predictions relating the human aspects of open collaborations.

Research limitations/implications

The specificity of this inquiry highlights valuable insights from double-gate smart cities’ innovation, social and urban as well. The research is largely interpretative and exploratory and while this provides a solid scientific foundation for further research, it does not, itself, subject any hypothesis to statistical testing and validation.

Originality/value

Since the city approached the smart city subject in a lean way, it was able to realize some projects in a faster way. Through specific initiatives, the city acquires the ability to involve more and better all its stakeholders such as citizens, companies, and public employees, among others. In this regard, the paper invigorates managerial debates concerning the urban and social aspects of open innovation ecosystems which represent in our minds a superior level of open innovation, testbeds of positive knowledge, and stimulus of knowledge dissemination process around the city.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Demokaan Demirel

This study aims to discuss the transformational effect of the smart governance concept, which is one of the complementary elements of the smart city concept and to explain…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss the transformational effect of the smart governance concept, which is one of the complementary elements of the smart city concept and to explain the change in governance structures according to the developments in information and communication technology.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the case study as one of the qualitative research methods is preferred, and smart city models of Barcelona, Amsterdam, Kocaeli and Ankara are examined.

Findings

In the research, scientific studies in the academic literature were evaluated according to the content analysis, and as a result of this analysis, the cities examined were grouped as “beginner,” “medium” and “advanced.” In the group, the characteristics of smart cities and the services they offer were taken into account. In this context, smart governance methods and their transformational effects are analyzed.

Originality/value

The most important contribution of this study to the literature is to identify the important characteristics of developed and successful smart city initiatives and to encourage their application to other developing world cities as a best practices model.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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