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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Amit Kumar Arya and Sanjiv Kumar Jain

A large number of small-scale industries have shown their existence in India, tough competition among them made the survival of small industries difficult. All facing…

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1280

Abstract

Purpose

A large number of small-scale industries have shown their existence in India, tough competition among them made the survival of small industries difficult. All facing problems like reduced production and poor quality. The case study presented in the paper deals with Kaizen implementation in a machine vice manufacturer company. Kaizen has tremendous impacts on the production techniques and lead times. Case study represented is to motivate practitioners for implementing Kaizen in small-scale industries of India. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology applied to implement the Kaizen in Indian small-scale industry. Fishbone diagrams have been used to represent cause and effects. The result has been shown as savings in terms of money and time.

Findings

Processing time has been reduced by 44.4 percent and an amount of Rs. 64,000 has been saved by recovering a total of 80 square feet working area. Improvements in the form of work flow have been achieved.

Research limitations/implications

Value stream mapping can be integrated with Kaizen for more reduction in the product lead time.

Practical implications

The paper will be worthily for practitioners and consultants for understanding Kaizen implementation in small-scale industry of India.

Originality/value

The paper yields lots of values for practitioners to understand the impacts and significance of the Kaizen in small-scale industries of India. Also it bridges the gap between theory and practical of Kaizen implementation in small-scale industry of India.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Darshak A. Desai and Aurangzeb Javed Ahmed Shaikh

This paper, a case study, aims to illustrate the application of Six Sigma in a small-scale ceramic manufacturing industry. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper, a case study, aims to illustrate the application of Six Sigma in a small-scale ceramic manufacturing industry. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the empirical application of DMAIC methodology to reduce failure rate at high voltage (HV) testing of one of the most critical products, insulator.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study is based on primary data collected from a real-life situation prevailing in the industry. The case study methodology adopted here is at one small-scale unit wherein the authors have applied DMAIC methodology and observed and recorded the improvement results, especially, reduction in failure rate at HV testing of insulator and, thus, increase in Sigma level.

Findings

The results found after implementation of the solutions are very significant. The rejection percentage has been reduced from 0.5 to 0.1 percent and consequently the Sigma level has been improved from 4.4 to 5.0.

Research limitations/implications

This success story can be a guiding roadmap for other such industries to successfully implement Six Sigma to improve quality, productivity and profitability.

Practical implications

This case study will serve as one of the resource bases for the industries which have till not implemented Six Sigma and benefited from the same.

Social implications

Improved quality and productivity leads to better economy. This case will help industries to serve the society with better economy with improved quality and productivity.

Originality/value

Though ceramic industries in India are having enormous potential for growth, majority of them, especially, small and medium industries are either not aware of or not implementing Six Sigma to reap its multidimensional benefits of improving quality, productivity and profitability. This study highlights the benefits reaped by small-scale ceramic manufacturing industry opening up the avenues for its application at other such organizations.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2010

R.N. Joshi and S.P. Singh

The Indian garment industry has witnessed a significant change since the inception of the New Textile Policy 2000 that suggests removing the industry from the list of…

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2550

Abstract

Purpose

The Indian garment industry has witnessed a significant change since the inception of the New Textile Policy 2000 that suggests removing the industry from the list of small‐scale industries with a view to improving its competitiveness in the global market. As productivity is the driving factor in enhancing the competitiveness of any decision‐making entity (firm), a study of total factor productivity (TFP) and its sources can provide vital inputs to a firm for improving its competitiveness. Keeping this as a backdrop, the paper attempts to measure the TFP in the Indian garment‐manufacturing firms; identify sources of the TFP; and suggest measures for the firms to enhance their productivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the firm‐level panel data collected from the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy for the years 2002‐2007. One output variable, namely, gross sale and four input variables, namely, net fixed assets, wages & salaries, raw material, and energy & fuel, have been selected. The DEA‐based Malmquist Productivity Index (MPI) approach has been applied to measure the TFP.

Findings

The Indian garment industry has achieved a moderate average TFP growth rate of 1.7 per cent per annum during the study period. The small‐scale firms are found to be more productive than the medium‐ and large‐scale firms. The decomposition of TFP growth into technical efficiency change (catch‐up effect) and technological change (frontier shift) reveals that the productivity growth is contributed largely by technical efficiency change rather than by technological change.

Originality/value

Earlier studies on the Indian garment industry have applied the partial factor productivity approach, which has several limitations. This paper measures the TFP and identifies its sources through applying a non‐parametric DEA‐based MPI approach. Through this approach, the productivity growth is decomposed into technical efficiency change and technological change. Further, an attempt has also been made to study the variation in the productivity growth rates across location, scale‐size and type of garments.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

K. Lavanya Latha and B.E.V.V.N. Murthy

The purpose of this paper is to study the problems faced by small‐scale entrepreneurs in Nellore District of Andhra Pradesh, India and also to study the opinions of…

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789

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the problems faced by small‐scale entrepreneurs in Nellore District of Andhra Pradesh, India and also to study the opinions of entrepreneurs regarding what are the different factors which are helpful for success of entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper is conducted by choosing a sample size of 30 per cent (196 units) randomly from the total population of 653 units. The data are collected through a structured questionnaire, informal interview and analyzed by using mean, ANOVA and Z‐test.

Findings

It is found that high price of raw materials, lack of marketing information and marketing of products are major problems faced by the entrepreneurs, followed by competition from small industries and absenteeism of labour. The majority (about 90.3 per cent) of the respondents did not want to make any complaint to government agencies.

Originality/value

The findings help to know the problems faced by small‐scale entrepreneurs in a developing country such as India and also help the policy makers to solve these problems.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

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Article
Publication date: 12 December 2019

Tarun Nanda, Himanshu Gupta, Tejinder P. Singh, Simonov Kusi-Sarpong, Chiappetta Jose Charbel Jabbour and Adriana Cherri

Technology and knowledge have become the buzzwords of the new millennium. Technological changes and demanding customers are creating a more knowledge intensive, turbulent…

Abstract

Purpose

Technology and knowledge have become the buzzwords of the new millennium. Technological changes and demanding customers are creating a more knowledge intensive, turbulent, complex and uncertain environment. Organizations, which are able to continually build faster and cheaper new strategic assets than their competitors, create long-term competitive advantages. Thus, the growth of companies is directly associated with innovativeness and technological development, especially for small organizations that are more vulnerable to dynamic changes in market place. Organizations need a strategic framework that can help them to achieve the goal of technology development and competitiveness. The purpose of this paper is to develop such strategic framework for small organizations for their technology development and, hence, survival in marketplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Options field methodology, options profile methodology, analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and fuzzy set theory are utilized to generate various options and profiles to propose a conceptual framework for technology development.

Findings

The results from the study showed that “mixed approach,” “strategic simulation approach” and the “regulatory environment approach,” in this order, emerged as the top three important options for the strategic technological development of small manufacturing enterprises.

Originality/value

This result can provide an original and more accurate implementation pathway toward technological innovative development in emerging economies. The proposed framework can provide valuable guidelines and recommendations to practicing managers and analysts for policy development to promote innovative and technological developments.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Dhwani Gambhir and Seema Sharma

Productivity gain in the manufacturing sector draws immense significance for all developing countries, particularly due to its contribution in enhancing competitiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

Productivity gain in the manufacturing sector draws immense significance for all developing countries, particularly due to its contribution in enhancing competitiveness and promoting economic growth in the long run. The purpose of this paper is to study the sources of productivity gain for large and small-scale manufacturing firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies productivity performance of Indian textile manufacturing industry using firm-level panel data of 160 companies for the period 2007-2008 to 2012-2013. The output-oriented Malmquist productivity index has been computed through data envelopment analysis. Further, the sources of productivity gain are identified for the entire textile industry as well as for the small and large-scale sector companies separately.

Findings

Regarding the sources of productivity gain, technology change and scale efficiency seem to be the major drivers. Pure efficiency change is a concern for all firms irrespective of scale. The results suggest that moderately large companies are exhibiting better productivity performance during the study period.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to a single industry, reference database and methodology. There is scope for further research at the micro-level to analyse the drivers of productivity for enterprises operating at different scales.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to existing literature by identifying the core action area for improving productivity performance in Indian textile manufacturing as the pure efficiency component. It also adds to research on the most productive scale of operation in manufacturing.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Book part
Publication date: 9 June 2011

Xin Tong

Purpose – The chapter explores how gendered division of labor shapes gender hierarchal relationships, inequality, social mobility, and labor solidarity of women and men…

Abstract

Purpose – The chapter explores how gendered division of labor shapes gender hierarchal relationships, inequality, social mobility, and labor solidarity of women and men workers in the small-scale restaurant industry in China.

Methodological approach – Thirty-four interviews with restaurant workers were conducted and a survey was taken.

Findings – Small-scale restaurants in China are patriarchal in structure that symbolizes a familial hegemonic regime. Labor is divided by gender, age and, to some extent, class with women concentrated in the lower positions. Most restaurant workers are young migrant women who come to the city to work before marrying and having children. Restaurant work is arduous: the hours are long and the wages are low. Women workers do not advance beyond the position of server, while men make use of social contacts and advance in status and wages. Because of kinship and village ties as well as divisions by age and gender, class solidarity cannot be achieved.

Value of the study – The chapter focuses on a topic that has been little studied. It furthers an understanding of intersectionality and inequality among food service workers in the context of China.

Details

Analyzing Gender, Intersectionality, and Multiple Inequalities: Global, Transnational and Local Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-743-8

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Akhilesh Barve and Kamalakanta Muduli

Green supply chain management (GSCM) has received growing attention in the last few years. Almost all industries including mining industries are hit by green fever. In…

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2151

Abstract

Purpose

Green supply chain management (GSCM) has received growing attention in the last few years. Almost all industries including mining industries are hit by green fever. In this context, this study aims to identify various challenges faced by the Indian mining industries during GSCM implementation and practices and to represent in a hierarchical manner.

Design/methodology/approach

Various barriers and contextual relationships among them have been identified. Classification of barriers has been carried out based upon dependence and driving power (DP) with the help of MICMAC analysis. In addition to this, a structural model of the barriers to GSCM practices in Indian mining industries has been put forward using interpretive structural modelling (ISM) technique.

Findings

In the present work, 11 numbers of relevant barriers have been identified from literature and subsequent discussions with experts from academia and industry. Lack of environmental awareness, poor legislation and inadequate pressure from societies positioned at the bottom of the hierarchy are found to be the key barriers. These barriers have high DP and less dependence.

Research limitations/implications

A model of these barriers has been developed based upon expert's opinions and literature survey. This model is not statistically validated. This model also does not quantify the adverse effect of each of the variables on GSCM practices in Indian mining industries.

Practical implications

The development of a hierarchy helps in the classification and categorization of the barriers, and thereby formulates their respective strategies and policies while providing clarity of thought. Also this hierarchy facilitates the allocation of resources in a rational manner at the time of scarcity of resources and to achieve the maximum benefits of the available resources.

Originality/value

The structured model developed will help to understand interdependence of the barriers. Using ISM, this paper has developed a hierarchy of these barriers which is useful to identify the hierarchy of actions to be taken for handling different barriers.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Faridah Shahadan

The economic crisis of 1997 necessitates a rethinking of the way Malaysia manages its economy. The call for a re‐examination of the government's role in the economy…

Abstract

The economic crisis of 1997 necessitates a rethinking of the way Malaysia manages its economy. The call for a re‐examination of the government's role in the economy necessitates an analysis of the government's past economic performance. This paper analyses the impact of a particular Malaysian government's policy, namely the creation of a Bumiputera Commercial and Industrial Community (BCIC). For purposes of analysis, this paper focuses on BCIC development in the food‐processing industry. The government has provided various support (such as, marketing, skill‐upgrading, technology) to Bumiputera in the food‐processing industry. This study uses a discriminant analysis to distinguish the characteristics of institutional support beneficiaries from those of non‐beneficiaries. The results of the study show that Bumiputera entrepreneurs who received and those who do not receive institutional supports, differ significantly in six characteristics. The six characteristics are entrepreneurs' level of education, their need‐for‐achievement, locus of control, communicative behaviour, firms' productivity, and level of process innovation. This study shows that those who have received institutional supports tend to have higher entrepreneurial qualities and firms that received institutional supports were more productive and innovative.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Olu Fadahunsi

The article presents an overview of discussions, particularlyconcerning developing countries in the Common‐wealth, of the role ofsmall enterprises as a viable means of…

Abstract

The article presents an overview of discussions, particularly concerning developing countries in the Common‐wealth, of the role of small enterprises as a viable means of promoting self‐reliance in economic development and diversity. Encouragement of the entrepreneurial spirit and skills is vital in this context. These are examined in detail and Commonwealth experiences are summarised with special emphasis on attitudes to entrepreneurs, women as entrepreneurs and the importance of training by experienced professionals.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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