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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Oludele A. Akinboade and Emilie Kinfack

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the regulation, awareness, compliance and performance of small and medium‐size enterprises (SMEs) in Cameroon's Central and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the regulation, awareness, compliance and performance of small and medium‐size enterprises (SMEs) in Cameroon's Central and Littoral regions, focusing on the manufacturing and retail sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

The full survey was conducted on 700 randomly selected SMEs which have identifiable business locations. From this, only 575 enterprises were retained for analysis after performing the coherence test.

Findings

Businesses registered for tax and those in the manufacturing sector see tax regulation as a burden. Those having opinions that regulation is rigid, inconsistent and that there is corruption also opine that regulation is negatively impacting on business. High compliance with customs and municipal regulations significantly negatively affect business development. On the other hand, high compliance with health and safety as well as trade regulations is good for SME development. Businesses registered with the Ministry of Trade tend to be more compliant, while those registered with the Municipality are not.

Practical implications

Overall, it is important that government should create an enabling environment for the development of the SMEs in Cameroon.

Originality/value

The number of studies focusing on the relationship between regulation and business performance in Africa is limited. Hence, the contribution of this paper is to enrich our understanding of this important field.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 39 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1994

Kenneth R. Gray and Robert E. Karp

The European Union (EU, formerly the European Community) celebrated, in November 1993, the ratification of the Maastrict Treaty pushing European union another step closer…

Abstract

The European Union (EU, formerly the European Community) celebrated, in November 1993, the ratification of the Maastrict Treaty pushing European union another step closer to realization. In the face of growing external forces (the disequilibrium caused by the disintegration of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, the war in Bosnia and global economic recession) that affect the planned progress and strategy the European Union (EU) leaders pursue, the authors of this article use a strategic management framework to analyze the EU. To our knowledge, this has not been attempted before. There is a growing volume of literature on the adaptation of the strategic management model to public sector institutions (Rainey, Backoff & Levine, 1976; Eadie & Steinbacher, 1985; Bryson & Williams, 1983; Nutt & Backoff, 1993). Public enterprises sometimes pursue objectives different from those of private — and third‐sector (non‐profit) enterprises (Jauch & Glueck, 1988). Public managers must be able to deal with more complex internal and external environments than private — and third sector managers. Despite these and other difficulties, a strategic analysis provides clues for effective strategic management in the public sector (Eadie & Steinbacher, 1985; Ring & Perry, 1985; Nutt & Backoff, 1993). A strategic management model is used here to provide a framework of analysis and direction on which critical areas of concern need to be addressed for the EU to continue with their creation of a community wholly open to the free and unimpeded circulation of people, services, capital and goods (Wechsler; Hahn, 1991).

Details

Management Research News, vol. 17 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

The Nguyen Huynh

The aim of this article is to investigate the determinants of the performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in emerging markets: evidence from Vietnam.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to investigate the determinants of the performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in emerging markets: evidence from Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

This article relies on the resource-based view to examine the factors affecting the performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in emerging markets. The method employed in the research is the generalized method of moments for testing hypotheses of data collected from the General Statistics Office of Vietnam in the period of 2013–2016.

Findings

The results show that factors such as the intensity of capital investment, age and size of the firm, labor productivity, foreign ownership, location, cost management effectiveness and export activities have a positive effect on the performance of Vietnamese small and medium-sized enterprises, while revenue growth rate, fixed assets and financial leverage tend to hinder their performance. This has brought important messages that the input markets and the business environment in emerging markets like Vietnam have not yet stimulated well-economic activities.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on a topic that has not been fully explored in small and medium-sized enterprises in emerging markets in general, and Vietnam in particular. Specifically, small and medium-sized enterprises in emerging markets reconfigure available resources and strengthen internal capabilities to overcome barriers of the shortages of strategic, rare and irreplaceable resources in order to improve their performance. This is a unique contribution to the existing literature and highlights the original value of this article.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Sanna Laukkanen, Sami Sarpola and Petri Hallikainen

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion on enterprise resource planning (ERP) system adoption by investigating the relationship of enterprise size to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion on enterprise resource planning (ERP) system adoption by investigating the relationship of enterprise size to the objectives and constraints of ERP adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

In the paper, survey data, based on the responses of 44 companies, are analyzed, by dividing the companies into small, medium‐sized, and large enterprises; and comparing these groups, using statistical methods.

Findings

The paper finds significant differences exist between small, medium‐sized and large enterprises regarding the objectives and constraints of ERP system adoption. While small enterprises experience more knowledge constraints, large enterprises are challenged by the changes imposed by ERP adoption. Further, large and medium‐sized enterprises are more outward‐oriented in ERP adoption than small enterprises. Business development, as opposed to mere efficiency improvement, while being the most prevalent objective for ERP adoption in all the company groups, is considered especially important by medium‐sized enterprises. Finally, the findings suggest that, instead of considering small and medium‐sized enterprises as one homogeneous group of smaller enterprises, differences between these two groups of companies should be acknowledged in information system adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that the Finnish context and the sample size should be taken into consideration when generalizing the findings.

Practical implications

The paper points out the differences in objectives and constraints between companies of different sizes that should be acknowledged in ERP adoption.

Originality/value

Instead of resorting to the customary approach of considering small and medium‐sized enterprises as a homogeneous group of smaller enterprises, this study acknowledges the differences between these two groups of companies.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2019

Khorshed Alam, Adewuyi Ayodele Adeyinka and Retha Wiesner

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether or not factors that impact the performance–innovation nexus differ from one percentage level of performance to another…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether or not factors that impact the performance–innovation nexus differ from one percentage level of performance to another among small- and medium-sized enterprises in regional Australia, with a specific focus on e-innovation by strategic and non-strategic firms in the agricultural sector and in other industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers implicitly assumed that the performance–innovation relationship is uniform across high-level, mid-level and low-level performing small- and medium-sized enterprises. In this study, the authors analysed performance at different percentage levels.

Findings

The findings indicate that the levels of small- and medium-sized enterprises performance have a significant difference in terms of the factors influencing their performance. The industry may be a determinant of performance, which is similar in the case of the topmost performers in the non-agricultural sector. The major findings of this study are as follows: the performance–innovation relationship differs by the percentage level of small- and medium-sized enterprises performance; and Solow’s productivity paradox exists at the firm level.

Practical implications

The authors recommend that rural policies should target low-performing firms. Moreover, researchers should adopt methodologies that shed light on the differences in the performance–innovation nexus across performance levels rather than one-size-fits-all methodologies that are often adopted.

Originality/value

The major contributions of this study are that the performance–innovation relationship differs by the level of small- and medium-sized enterprises performance, and Solow’s productivity paradox exists at the firm level.

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Shiaw‐Wen Tien, Yi‐Chan Chung, Chih‐Hung Tsai, Chia‐Hsiang Hsieh and Hung‐Hsi Chen

This research probes into the execution of small and medium‐sized enterprises’ value creativities by a difference analysis with different classifications, different…

Abstract

This research probes into the execution of small and medium‐sized enterprises’ value creativities by a difference analysis with different classifications, different capital, different turnover, different employees, and different established years. This study develop a questionnaire about value creativity with five dimensions and thirty‐five items according to “Valuation” by McKinsey and Company, Inc. and Copeland et al., such as: “Aspiration and target,” “Portfolio management,” “Organization design,” “Process management,” and “Business and individual performance management.” The results are as follows: (1) Most small and medium‐ sized enterprises (SMEs) have executed value creativities; (2) There is a difference in the execution of value creativities between the livelihood industry and the chemical industry; the execution of value creativities by livelihood industry is better than the chemical industry; (3) For value creativities of the execution of different capital and turnover for SMEs, bigger entities are better than smaller ones; (4) For the value creativities of the execution of different numbers of staff in SMEs, those with more staff are better than those with fewer staff; (5) For the value creativities of the execution of different established years for SMEs, those established longer are better than those established shorter.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

The Nguyen Huynh and Nguyen Thuy An Hua

This study examines the relationship between task-oriented leadership style, psychological capital, job satisfaction and organizational commitment: evidence from…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the relationship between task-oriented leadership style, psychological capital, job satisfaction and organizational commitment: evidence from Vietnamese small and medium-sized enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The method employed in the research is the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) for testing hypotheses of data collected from a sample of 800 employees working in small and medium-sized enterprises in Vietnam.

Findings

The results show that the task-oriented leadership style has a positive impact on organizational commitment, limits job satisfaction and no obvious association with the psychological capital of employees. Besides, job satisfaction and psychological capital play an important role in the organizational commitment of employees in small and medium-sized enterprises of Vietnam.

Originality/value

This paper aims to shed light on a less fully explored topic for organizational behavior in small and medium-sized enterprises in emerging markets like Vietnam. In contrast to extensive studies on the participative and supportive leader, this study focuses on task-oriented leadership style in the testing and analysis to understand the theory of leadership style, psychological capital, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in emerging markets and provides more knowledge on employee behavior management for companies in Vietnam. This is a unique contribution to the original value of this article.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Christer Karlsson and Pär Åhlström

Addresses the question of whether the lean enterprise concept is applicable to small and medium‐sized firms. The implications of the lean enterprise framework for the…

Abstract

Addresses the question of whether the lean enterprise concept is applicable to small and medium‐sized firms. The implications of the lean enterprise framework for the smaller firm can be summarized in three basic ideas. First, building a larger and more comprehensive offer through partnerships, which has a potential to offer comparatively significant advantages. Second, building unique competence through collaboration with smaller and focused businesses. Third, avoiding large geographical distances when collaborating in more advanced knowledge areas and paying attention to the amount of corporate management capacity that can be occupied by global networking issues.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Caroline Nicholas and Michael Fruhmann

This paper will consider the rationale and effectiveness of SMEsupport policies in the award of public procurement (PP) contracts. One group of economic justifications for

Abstract

This paper will consider the rationale and effectiveness of SMEsupport policies in the award of public procurement (PP) contracts. One group of economic justifications for SME policies derives from the notion that awarding PP contracts to SMEs (and micro-enterprises) encourages innovation, entrepreneurship and so contributes to job creation, economic growth and can support local and regional developments to the benefit of wider society. The link between SMEs, innovation and economic growth has often been assumed in PP policy-making. While some studies show higher growth rates in small than larger firms, others indicate, to the contrary, that many micro and small enterprises, and particularly informal businesses, are not actively seeking to grow. This paper will assess how effective SME policies may be, and questions the extent to which they are properly evaluated.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2016

Ansgar Zerfass and Luisa Winkler

Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are seldom the focus of corporate communication research. However, they are the heart of the European economy and, as such, of…

Abstract

Small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are seldom the focus of corporate communication research. However, they are the heart of the European economy and, as such, of utmost importance for communication science and practice. This chapter contributes to the body of knowledge by investigating how corporate communication is practised and by understanding how communication prevails in small and medium firms in Germany. The chapter starts with a clarification of current definitions of such organisations, which are very heterogeneous. Special features of SMEs – like the strong position of founder and their proximity to the company – have to be taken into account when analysing communication structures and activities. Empirical insights based on a survey of 572 respondents show that most SMEs understand corporate communication as dialogue and their governance structure for communication is oriented towards the top management. The most important communication instruments used by SMEs are websites, media relations, personal communication and events/trade fairs. Findings are presented and linked to an overarching perspective of strategic communication.

Details

The Management Game of Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-716-8

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