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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Milla Emilia Vaha

It has been estimated that some Small Island Developing States might have only decades before their territories become uninhabitable. Future of these states poses timely…

Abstract

Purpose

It has been estimated that some Small Island Developing States might have only decades before their territories become uninhabitable. Future of these states poses timely questions to world politics. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the potential hosts and endangered states at the time of relocation by looking at two relocation scenarios: Kiribati/New Zealand and the Maldives/Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses normative international political theory to explore the nature of relocation. It critically examines the proposal for the free right to choose the new host state. Guided by two examples, the paper proposes that we should not ignore the contingent reasoning when evaluating these hypothetical scenarios.

Findings

The paper argues that the endangered state might have ethical grounds for its rights–claims to continuous existence on a chosen territory. At the same time, both scenarios looked at here also impose serious constraints. By illustrating these constraints, the paper aims at mapping some central challenges that the continuity of endangered states creates to international state-system. The paper argues that the complex relationships between the potential hosts and the relocating communities should not be ignored.

Originality/value

This paper provides a contextual analysis of two hypothetical relocation scenarios. In doing so, it relies on comparative research in two regions and offers a normative argument in relation to the rights of both endangered and host populations.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Abstract

Details

Government and Public Policy in the Pacific Islands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-616-8

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Joeli Veitayaki

Climate change adaptations are today pursed globally to address the threats associated with climate change. The IPCC Third Assessment Report and the Fourth Assessment…

Abstract

Climate change adaptations are today pursed globally to address the threats associated with climate change. The IPCC Third Assessment Report and the Fourth Assessment Report have outlined the most accurate changes to be expected by 2100 with the only uncertainty relating to the timing and magnitude of these changes, not their occurrence (IPCC, 2007). In Small Island Developing States (SIDS), the changes are already manifested through coastal flooding, erosion, salt water intrusion, damaged water sources, and increased storm damages. SIDS are also under threat from their rapidly increasing population that needs settlements, services, and facilities, their limited size that severely confines their options, and their poor resources both in terms of weak financial position and restricted human capacity. This is the reason why SIDS, which will be the first and worst victims, must devote more concerted effort to adapt to these eventualities.

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: Issues and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-487-1

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Godfrey Baldacchino

This paper offers a critical review of climate change related initiatives in small island states, including Small Island Developing States (SIDS), which can end up as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers a critical review of climate change related initiatives in small island states, including Small Island Developing States (SIDS), which can end up as ontological traps: fuelled and supported by external donor agencies, thwarting out-migration and shifting scarce and finite resources away from other, shorter-term and locally spawned development trajectories and objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a selective literature review. It clusters important themes found in published research and policy documents.

Findings

The results identify a burgeoning critical voice in regards to resilience and its legitimation of climate change driven projects in SIDS. This paper recommends a more nuanced approach which also privileges migration.

Originality/value

This paper provided a critical overview and synthesis of the immobility implicit in much climate change related work, through the critical lens of island studies and post-colonial studies.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Innovation Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-310-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Clem Tisdell

The purpose of this paper is to outline the cause of global warming, its trends and consequences as indicated by the International Panel on Climate Change. Sea‐level rise…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the cause of global warming, its trends and consequences as indicated by the International Panel on Climate Change. Sea‐level rise is one consequence of particular concern to Pacific Island states. It also reviews the views of economists about connections between economic growth and global warming.

Design/methodology/approach

International efforts, such as through the Kyoto protocol, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and their atmospheric concentration are discussed and prospects for post‐Kyoto policies are considered. Ways are also examined of addressing the consequences of global warming for the Pacific Island states. How they will be affected and to what extent is discussed, together with their ability to cope with the emerging problem.

Findings

The paper finds that whereas the majority of economists did not foresee a conflict between economic growth and global warming, the possibility of such a conflict is now more widely recognized following the Stern Report. It is predicted that a significant reduction in global greenhouse gas emissions is unlikely to be achieved in the foreseeable future owing to conflicting national interest (a prisoners' dilemma problem) and because is will take time to develop new technologies which will reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, payment for greenhouse gas emissions (for example, via tradable permits) will accelerate desirable technological advance. Both international political action and efforts to develop and use technologies that lower greenhouse gas emissions need to be pursued. Given current and likely increases in greenhouse gas emissions, continuing global warming in this century (and beyond) appears to be inevitable and consequently Pacific Island states will be adversely affected by sea‐level rise and climate change.

Originality/value

The paper emphasizes that Pacific Island states will suffer great hardship from global warming but are ill‐placed geographically, financially and administratively to prevent or adjust to the possible environmental disasters that await them. Nothing may save some from eventual environmental annihilation.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Government and Public Policy in the Pacific Islands
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-616-8

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Patricia Loga and Anand Chand

There is extant literature on performance appraisal systems (PAS) in public sector globally; however, most of the literature focuses on PAS in public sector in large…

Abstract

Purpose

There is extant literature on performance appraisal systems (PAS) in public sector globally; however, most of the literature focuses on PAS in public sector in large developed and large developing countries. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is scant literature on PAS in the public sector of small developing countries. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to fill the research gap and analyse employee perceptions of the annual performance appraisal (APA) system and its implications in the Fiji’s public sector. It examines the APA more specifically in the case study of Ministry of Health and Medical Services in Fiji.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was undertaken and information collected from each research method was triangulated to ensure the reliability and validity of the findings.

Findings

This study found that the APA system shows promise of delivering on the expected outcomes for PAS. Similarly, staff morale was found to increase while employee behaviour improved with employee involvement and simple key performance indicators. However, much work needs to be done at the macro, meso and micro level of policy planning and implementation in order to ensure the success of APA.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this research are that it is based solely on Fiji’s experience and future research could expand this study to other developing country contexts, especially small island states.

Originality/value

After conducting a literature review on developed nations and research in a small developing country (Fiji), this paper produces two models: a PAS model in the developed country context and another in Fiji’s small developing country context. This paper contributes to the existing literature of PAS in the public sector and more specifically in the context of developing small island countries.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Adelle Thomas and Lisa Benjamin

This study aims to assess policies and mechanisms in Caribbean and Pacific small island developing states (SIDS) that address climate-induced migration and displacement…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess policies and mechanisms in Caribbean and Pacific small island developing states (SIDS) that address climate-induced migration and displacement. The migration of communities away from vulnerable regions is highly likely to be an adaptation strategy used in low-elevation SIDS, as the impacts of climate change are likely to result in significant loss and damage, threatening their very territorial existence. SIDS must ensure that residents relocate to less vulnerable locations and may need to consider international movement of residents. Ad hoc approaches to migration and displacement may result in increased vulnerability of residents, making the development and enforcement of comprehensive national policies that address these issues a necessity.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiators for SIDS as well as analysis of secondary data, including Intended Nationally Determined Contributions, are utilized to determine policies and mechanisms in place that focus on climate-induced migration and displacement.

Findings

While climate change is acknowledged as an existential threat, few SIDS have policies or mechanisms in place to guide climate-induced migration and displacement. Potential exists for migration and displacement to be included in policies that integrate disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation along with national sustainable development plans. Regional bodies are beneficial to providing guidance to SIDS in the development of nationally appropriate frameworks to address climate-induced migration and displacement.

Originality/value

Existing gaps in policies and mechanisms and challenges faced by SIDS in developing strategies to address climate-induced migration and displacement are explored. Best practices and recommendations for strategies for SIDS to address migration and displacement are provided.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Denise D.P. Thompson

The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of disaster logistics among Caribbean small island developing states that are Caribbean Community (CARICOM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the current state of disaster logistics among Caribbean small island developing states that are Caribbean Community (CARICOM) members, and, based on those findings propose a coherent logistics framework that could influence the development of a robust system that can effectively respond to disasters in the region.

Design/methodology/approach

Consisted of a series of in-depth interviews with national and regional disaster managers in the Caribbean. Secondary sources augmented the interviews. Data analysis conformed to Pope, et al. guidelines for qualitative research. There are limitations to this approach, but, the lack of existing research on the region and the need for information on the topic justify the approach.

Findings

The main findings show the lack of a coherent and integrated logistics strategy. Missing or weak components like transportation and distribution infrastructure, a procurement strategy, inadequate port facilities and insufficient human resources undermine the overall logistics performance. Although limitations of small island status further weigh on the development and implementation of a regional logistics approach is possible. The paper proposes one.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework has implications for disaster management and disaster policy in the Caribbean. From a disaster policy perspective it suggests important logistics governance decisions including funding, scalability issues and formalized agreements that must be made collectively.

Practical implications

From a management perspective the shows how to strengthen the regional response mechanism (RRM), builds efficiency in response and provides redundancies in the regional logistics system.

Originality/value

This paper’s value lies in its focus on a region that is often omitted in academic literature, but is disaster-prone. Importantly, the research proposes a workable framework on which to build a robust logistics infrastructure and improve logistics capacity based on primary research.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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