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Article

Sladjana Nørskov, Peter Kesting and John Parm Ulhøi

This paper aims to present that deliberate change is strongly associated with formal structures and top-down influence. Hierarchical configurations have been used to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present that deliberate change is strongly associated with formal structures and top-down influence. Hierarchical configurations have been used to structure processes, overcome resistance and get things done. But is deliberate change also possible without formal structures and hierarchical influence?

Design/methodology/approach

This longitudinal, qualitative study investigates an open-source software (OSS) community named TYPO3. This case exhibits no formal hierarchical attributes. The study is based on mailing lists, interviews and observations.

Findings

The study reveals that deliberate change is indeed achievable in a non-hierarchical collaborative OSS community context. However, it presupposes the presence and active involvement of informal change agents. The paper identifies and specifies four key drivers for change agents’ influence.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to organisational analysis by providing a deeper understanding of the importance of leadership in making deliberate change possible in non-hierarchical settings. It points to the importance of “change-by-conviction”, essentially based on voluntary behaviour. This can open the door to reducing the negative side effects of deliberate change also for hierarchical organisations.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article

Sladjana Nørskov, Polymeros Chrysochou and Marina Milenkova

This paper aims to examine the impact of product innovation attributes (complexity, relative advantage, compatibility, trialability and observability) on brand equity, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the impact of product innovation attributes (complexity, relative advantage, compatibility, trialability and observability) on brand equity, and whether these attributes exert a different effect on low- versus high-equity brands. The moderating role of consumer innovativeness in this relationship is investigated further.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on survey data from users of two brands of digital audio players of different brand equity levels.

Findings

Overall, it was found that innovation attributes have an effect on brand equity, and this effect differs between low- and high-equity brands, with a low-equity brand being benefited more than a high-equity brand from perceptions towards a product’s innovation attributes. Additionally, it was found that the impact of complexity and relative advantage on brand equity increases when consumer innovativeness increases in the case of a high-equity brand. However, no significant difference was found between low- and high-equity brands regarding the proposed moderating effect of innovativeness.

Research limitations/implications

The study only examines two brands belonging to one particular industry, which limits the findings’ generalizability. Thus, the use of more test brands from different industries should be the goal for future research.

Practical implications

Managers should consider the firm’s current brand equity level and its competitive position to maximize the effect of product innovation attributes.

Originality/value

The study makes an original contribution to the research on the relationship between product innovation and brand equity and provides theoretical and managerial implications in the field of innovation and brand management.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Pradeep Kumar Ponnamma Divakaran and Sladjana Nørskov

The purpose of this paper is to investigate two questions. First, are movie-based online community evaluations (CE) on par with film expert evaluations of new movies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate two questions. First, are movie-based online community evaluations (CE) on par with film expert evaluations of new movies? Second, which group makes more reliable and accurate predictions of movie box office revenues: film reviewers or an online community?

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a movie-based online community Fandango for a 16-month period and included all movies released during this time (373 movies). The authors compared film reviewers’ evaluations with the online CE during the first eight weeks of the movie’s release.

Findings

The study finds that community members evaluate movies differently than film reviewers. The results also reveal that CE have more predictive power than film reviewers’ evaluations, especially during the opening week of a movie.

Research limitations/implications

The investigated online community is based in the USA, hence the findings are limited to this geographic context.

Practical implications

The main implication is that film studios and movie-goers can rely more on CE than film reviewers’ evaluation for decision making. Online CE can help film studios in negotiating with distributors, theatre owners for the number of screens. Also, community reviews rather than film reviewers’ reviews are looked upon by future movie-goers for movie choice decisions.

Originality/value

The study makes an original contribution to the motion picture performance research as well as to the growing research on online consumer communities by demonstrating the predictive potential of online communities with regards to evaluations of new movies.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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