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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Kam Jugdev and Gita Mathur

This paper aims to present a high‐level conceptual framework to strengthen the conceptual bridge between project management and workplace learning by applying situated

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1698

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a high‐level conceptual framework to strengthen the conceptual bridge between project management and workplace learning by applying situated learning theory to project management practice to guide shared learning within and between projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper bridges situated learning theory from the workplace learning literature and the resource‐based view (RBV) of project management from the strategic management literature, using them as lenses to view two learning mechanisms in the project management domain, project reviews and communities of practices.

Findings

The paper finds that situated learning theory can be applied to project management to highlight processes that enable capability development through shared project learning.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is conceptual in nature and intended to make a case for empirical research that draws on workplace learning literature which is useful to project management as there remains the challenge of leveraging these perspectives for project management practice.

Practical implications

The paper believes that situated learning theory offers insights that can be leveraged to make project management environments more effective through improved intra‐project and inter‐project shared learning.

Originality/value

This paper presents a high‐level conceptual framework to bridge situated learning theory to the RBV of project management. The paper finds that situated learning theory is well suited to contribute to an understanding of shared learning in projects and justifies future research.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2011

Eleanor Hamilton

The purpose of this paper is to contribute towards understanding how entrepreneurial learning might be understood as being socially situated, embedded in everyday practice…

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6121

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute towards understanding how entrepreneurial learning might be understood as being socially situated, embedded in everyday practice in the context of family business. The study is framed by three main principles drawn from situated learning theory. First, the family and the business are examined as overlapping communities of practice, as sites of practice‐based knowledge. Second, the concept of legitimate peripheral participation is explored in relation to members of the family business. Finally, how practice is both reproduced and transformed over time is examined in the context of two generations' participation in a family business.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on an empirical study of two generations from five families, the founders of a business and their successors. The interview approach adopted phenomenological techniques. A thematic analysis identified conceptual frameworks to make sense of the data in a “quasi grounded” approach. Finally, the three main principles introduced from situated learning theory – communities of practice, legitimate peripheral participation, and cycles of reproduction and transformation provided a conceptual framework to analyse the empirical material.

Research limitations/implications

This is an interpretive, qualitative study based on a small sample of families based in the North West of England. The findings are not intended to be generalised to a population, but to offer empirical insights that extend theoretical frameworks in order to better understand the entrepreneurial phenomenon.

Practical implications

The experience of the second generation both in the family business and in overlapping contexts of learning‐in‐practice brings innovation and change as well as continuity. The study also suggests that the complex process of succession might be informed by the understanding of the importance of the nature and extent of participation in the family business over time.

Originality/value

This paper introduces conceptual frameworks that capture the social complexity of intergenerational entrepreneurial learning and contributes an empirical illustration of situated learning theory within the context of family business. The situated learning perspective contrasts with much of the existing entrepreneurial learning literature, which has tended to focus on “the entrepreneur” and individual learning processes. This study demonstrates that applying a learning lens brings theoretical insights to the study of family business.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Shaoan Zhang, Mark Carroll, Chengcheng Li and Emily Lin

This paper aims to expand the theory of situated learning with the application of technology and provides a technology-based situated learning model with suggestions for…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to expand the theory of situated learning with the application of technology and provides a technology-based situated learning model with suggestions for doctoral program design.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of the relevant topics was conducted. Themes emerged by the systematic review of the relevant studies and theoretical framework.

Findings

Studies reveal that part-time doctoral students often feel unsupported, dissatisfied and disconnected with their program. Many of these issues may be mitigated by faculty and peer mentoring, and various forms of asynchronous communication through a situated learning framework with interactive communication technologies.

Research limitations/implications

Research of doctoral education should pay more attention to part-time doctoral students and investigate the quality of their programs given their individual needs, and how their progression and completion can be achieved through the innovative approaches proposed in this study.

Practical implications

Program designers may use a technology-based situated learning approach in program design to fulfill part-time doctoral students’ needs toward enhancing mentorship, students’ academic self-efficacy and career preparation. Further support is offered through a virtual community of practice.

Social implications

This paper draws researchers’ attention to program design and part-time doctoral students’ retention and completion of a doctoral program.

Originality/value

This study provides an innovative synergetic model that helps administrators and program designers to design doctoral programs and motivates researchers to conduct research regarding part-time doctoral students.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Paul Lyons

The aim of this article is to describe the scenistic approach to training with corresponding activities and the theory bases that support the approach.

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2046

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to describe the scenistic approach to training with corresponding activities and the theory bases that support the approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Presented is the definition of the concept of scenistic training along with the step‐by‐step details of the implementation of the approach. Scenistic methods, while clear examples of situated cognition and learning, are derived from several other important theory bases to include constructivism, experiential learning, mental models, transformative learning, and action theory.

Findings

The theory base offers support for the activities and steps contained in scenistic training methods. The theories, in combination, address motivation, distinct learning tasks and activities, and the regulation of learning. To an extent, scenistic methods invite the trainee to create and manage learning with guidance and support from trainers. This delegation of responsibility to the trainee has powerful motivational consequences.

Research limitations/implications

In this article a detailed presentation of the concepts and theories that support the development and use of scenistic training methods is offered. Even though the efficacy of scenistic methods are supported with empirical research, the theory‐base for the methods has not been carefully explained.

Practical implications

Most of the development of scenistic methods has taken place in the past ten years, a time period in which there has not been a lot of interest displayed in new training approaches. This article seeks to illuminate the concept for practitioners and scholars of training as well as to offer detailed theory grounding for scenistic methods.

Originality/value

Originality and value are combined in the expression of the details of a somewhat generic model of scenistic methods as well as a reasonably broad perspective of theories that help to explain the dynamics of the steps in the approach.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Andrew J. Sense and Richard J. Badham

The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarise a successfully completed doctoral thesis which longitudinally and intimately explored the social dynamics of learning

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981

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to briefly summarise a successfully completed doctoral thesis which longitudinally and intimately explored the social dynamics of learning activity within a project team.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was pursued through participative action research applied to a case study project team.

Findings

The key findings of this study included the identification and analysis of five sociological elements which moderate the situated learning behaviour of participants while they are on‐the‐job. Combined, these elements form a model of project situated learning behaviour.

Practical implications

The findings generated focus attention on the complex social and practical issues involved in learning within projects and provide a framework that aids practitioners' systematic reflection and action on their learning activities.

Originality/value

This study provides deep and original insights into the learning phenomenon within the practice of project management. There has already been numerous journal publications generated from it, and in late 2007, the author of this thesis published a book largely based on this doctoral work entitled Cultivating Learning within Projects, by Andrew Sense, Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN: 0230006914 ISBN‐13: 9780230006911. This book can be sourced directly from Palgrave Macmillan at: www.palgrave.com/products/title.aspx?PID = 276502

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Robert Farrell and William Badke

– The purpose of this article is to consider the current barriers to situating in the disciplines and to offer a possible strategy for so doing.

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2352

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to consider the current barriers to situating in the disciplines and to offer a possible strategy for so doing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews current challenges facing librarians who seek to situate information literacy in the disciplines and offers and practical model for those wishing to do so. Phenomenographic evidence from disciplinary faculty focus groups is presented in the context of the model put forward.

Findings

Disciplinary faculty do not have generic conceptions of information literacy but rather understand information-related behaviors as part of embodied disciplinary practice.

Practical implications

Librarians dissatisfied with traditional forms of generic information literacy instruction marketing will find a method by which to place ownership on information literacy in the hands of disciplinary faculty.

Originality/value

The article offers a unique analysis of the challenges facing current information literacy specialists and a new approach for integrating information literacy in the disciplines.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Elin Kubberød and Inger Beate Pettersen

The purpose of this paper is to expand on the entrepreneurial learning literature and situated learning theory to explore how students with different educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to expand on the entrepreneurial learning literature and situated learning theory to explore how students with different educational backgrounds learn to recognise opportunities at the periphery of an entrepreneurial practice. The authors theoretically outline factors that may influence students’ entrepreneurial learning, including co-participation and roles at the periphery, power relations in communities of practice (CoP), and emotional exposure. The authors make use of the concept legitimate peripheral participation and Politis’ entrepreneurial learning framework to explore empirically students’ entrepreneurial learning transformations and entrepreneurial learning outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted a qualitative approach in research, used the focus group methodology and the critical incident technique in interviewing. The research investigated two groups of Norwegian master students that differed in educational background aiming to explore their experience with entrepreneurial learning in a three months long internship in American start-ups representing emerging CoPs.

Findings

The research identified important factors influencing students’ entry transitions into an entrepreneurial practice, highlighting the complexity in peripheral participation. By acknowledging and exploring the social dimensions in students’ learning, the authors demonstrate and exemplify how these influence students’ entrepreneurial learning trajectories, learning outcomes and ultimately their influence in students’ contributions to the practice community.

Originality/value

The research integrates the existing entrepreneurial learning literature and situated learning theory to identify various factors influencing entrepreneurial learning, contributing with novel insights about the role of peripherality in students’ entrepreneurial learning in situated practice.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Louisa Feldmann

A central aim of higher education is employability, in order to enable graduates to act in dynamic working environments. Internships as the prevalent work-based learning

Abstract

Purpose

A central aim of higher education is employability, in order to enable graduates to act in dynamic working environments. Internships as the prevalent work-based learning (WBL) settings offer such an opportunity during the studies; they are commonly used and broadly researched as interventions to improve students’ skills and competences. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influencing factors on students’ skills and competences that lead to employability in WBL settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a synthesis of relevant international empirical research on beneficial effects of the very common WBL setting, internship, to create a research framework across disciplines.

Findings

The current research is characterized by a search for “best practices,” rather than a holistic and systematic view, acknowledging and taking into account different perspectives and their influence. It cannot sufficiently explain why employability in some WBL settings is enhanced more than in others. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the current understanding and evaluation of WBL as an experiential and situated learning experience. It is essential to take promotive factors from the university, the practical partner and the student perspective into account to understand employability enhancement. Based on these findings, a research framework for a holistic perspective on influencing factors of students’ employability is designed.

Research limitations/implications

There is no empirical proof for the findings yet. Future empirical research may, therefore, be directed toward empirical testing of the impact of WBL settings.

Originality/value

It is possible to infer recommendations for improving WBL settings from the three parties involved by interlinking situated and experiential theory.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Kasey Windels and Karen L. Mallia

In the male-dominant creative industries, do men and women have access to the same resources for career learning and development? The purpose of this paper is to examine…

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1429

Abstract

Purpose

In the male-dominant creative industries, do men and women have access to the same resources for career learning and development? The purpose of this paper is to examine women’s perspectives of their career trajectories in advertising creative departments.

Design/methodology/approach

Situated learning theory views learning as produced through interaction with and increasing participation in a community of practice. Interviews were conducted with 19 female creatives to examine two research questions: first, how do women develop identities as creative practitioners within the male dominated advertising creative department? and second, how are women’s learning trajectories influenced by their gender?

Findings

Gendered expectations affected the type of work women were supposed to produce, their ability to sell work, and the types of assignments they received. Women lacked legitimacy and experienced difficulties developing an identity as a master practitioner. They instead emphasized parts of their identity unrelated to the profession.

Research limitations/implications

Women were unable to develop identities as full members of the community of practice. The identity formed in conjunction with work was that of a person with lesser talents, fewer opportunities, and less valued contributions, causing them to exit the field or seek positive identity from places other than work.

Originality/value

This study was the first study that the authors are aware of to examine empirically the relationship between situated learning theory and gender. It provided evidence from women’s perspectives that gender restricted access to material for forming a positive work-identity, which impeded learning as women realized and accepted they were on a different trajectory than similarly-situated males.

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Hope J. Hartman

Undergraduate and graduate teacher education students in a culturally diverse, urban university consume and construct knowledge as they engage in a Piaget WebQuest and…

Abstract

Undergraduate and graduate teacher education students in a culturally diverse, urban university consume and construct knowledge as they engage in a Piaget WebQuest and subsequently construct their own Individual WebQuests. The activities involved in these assignments are underpinned by a combination of complementary theoretical frameworks: Cognitive Constructivism, Social Constructivism, Information Processing, and Situated Learning. The chapter describes how all of these theoretical frameworks are applied in the WebQuests. It includes detailed descriptions of how students engage in and create their own WebQuests. Descriptions include details of how scaffolding is used to support students in their work. Scaffolding that occurs during the Piaget WebQuest process sets the stage for creation of Individual WebQuests, while additional scaffolding is provided during the Individual WebQuest creation process. This chapter also emphasizes teaching metacognition in the design and revision of WebQuest requirements and students’ metacognition as they engage in the Piaget WebQuest and create their own Individual WebQuests. The processes of engaging in and creating WebQuests are described and examples of students’ WebQuest authentic products shared with a community of learners are provided. Products include Piaget WebQuest-based quizzes, lesson analyses, handouts, and instructional activity designs. They also include individual WebQuests in a variety of academic subjects. Sharing authentic products in a community of practice reflects situated learning theory. Consuming and constructing knowledge through WebQuests involves a complex synthesis of current theories of learning and instruction which facilitates meaningful learning and transfer.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Online Learning Activities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-236-3

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