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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Sion Williams, Mike Nolan and John Keady

Discharging frail older people from acute hospital settings has been an issue of concern for over 40 years and recent studies suggest that enduring problems remain. This…

Abstract

Discharging frail older people from acute hospital settings has been an issue of concern for over 40 years and recent studies suggest that enduring problems remain. This paper explores the experiences of discharge from three different units: an acute surgical ward, an acute medical ward and a specialist ward for older people. Based on extensive data from interviews with older people, their family carers and ward‐based staff, a grounded theory of the discharge experience is presented. This suggests that the quality of discharge hinges largely on whether the focus of efforts is on ‘pace’ (the desire to discharge older people as rapidly as possible) or ‘complexity’ (where due account is taken of the complex interaction of medical and wider social issues). When pace is the focus, ‘pushing’ and ‘fixing’ are the main processes driving discharge. However, when attention is given to complexity, far more subtle processes of ‘informing’ and ‘brokering’ are in evidence. These latter processes are conceived of as forms of ‘relational practice’ and it is argued that such practices lie at the heart of high quality care for older people.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

John Keady and Sion Williams

Co‐constructed Inquiry has been built in partnership with specialist nurse practitioners, university‐based researchers (with a clinical background in stroke and dementia…

Abstract

Co‐constructed Inquiry has been built in partnership with specialist nurse practitioners, university‐based researchers (with a clinical background in stroke and dementia care) and people living with long‐term conditions. Co‐constructed Inquiry introduces the language of drama and theatre into the theory building and reporting process and consists of three stages: Building the set; Performing the production; and Bringing down the curtain. People with long‐term conditions represent subjective experience through the production of a life story script, a personal theory and, eventually, a collective theory. The personal theory is usually presented as a diagram, or a series of diagrams. Co‐constructed Inquiry sheds new light on participative methods of inquiry and in the development of co‐constructed grounded theory.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Abstract

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Sezgin Kaya and Bernard Williams

Business changes challenge the predictability of the workplace formation. In the broader sense, business change affects workplaces through forming and re‐forming groups…

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Abstract

Business changes challenge the predictability of the workplace formation. In the broader sense, business change affects workplaces through forming and re‐forming groups, teams and business units, so causing ‘churn’ in workplaces. The aim of this paper is to present research evidence on churn strategies and approaches extracted from the Centre for Facilities Management’s research on five financial organisations based in the City of London, one of the most volatile business environments in the world. The different approaches are analysed systematically to understand the possible impact of churn on business and how to deal with it effectively. In this paper the evidence of the link between business and workplace change is explored, and a background for consensus on churn processes is discussed. The findings and conclusions are then compared with previous studies by Bernard Williams Associates for the practical implications.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Dee Gray and Sion Williams

This paper aims to discuss and present research findings from a proof of concept pilot, set up to test whether a teaching intervention which incorporated a dual reporting…

1654

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss and present research findings from a proof of concept pilot, set up to test whether a teaching intervention which incorporated a dual reporting and learning approach from adverse incidents, could contribute towards individual and organisational approaches to patient safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The study formed part of a series of six iterative action research cycles involving the collaboration of students (all National Health Service (NHS) staff) in the co‐creation of knowledge and materials relating to understanding and learning from adverse incidents. This fifth qualitative study involved (n=20) anaesthetists who participated in a two phase teaching intervention (n=20 first phase, n=10 second phase) which was premised on transformative learning, value placed on learning from adverse incidents and reframing the learning experience.

Findings

An evaluation of the teaching intervention demonstrated that how students learned from adverse incidents, in addition to being provided with opportunities to transform negative experiences through re‐framing learning, was significant in breaking out of practices which had become routine; propositional knowledge on learning from adverse incidents, along with the provision of a safe learning environment in which to challenge assumptions about learning from adverse incidents, were significant factors in the re‐framing process. The testing of a simulated dual learning/reporting system was indicated as a useful mechanism with which to reinforce a positive learning culture, to report and learn from adverse incidents and to introduce new approaches which might otherwise have been lost.

Practical implications

The use of a “re‐framed learning approach” and identification of additional leverage points (values placed on learning and effects of dual reporting and learning) will be of significant worth to those working in the field of individual and organisational learning generally, and of value specifically to those whose concern is the need to learn from adverse incidents.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to individual and organisational learning by looking at a specific part of the learning system associated specifically with adverse incidents.

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Dee Gray and Sion Williams

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a study that illuminates how leadership can be engendered in one context and transferred to another.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present findings from a study that illuminates how leadership can be engendered in one context and transferred to another.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents some of the findings from a longitudinal study on individual and organisational learning from adverse incidents, action research was the overarching methodology. The study (fourth in a total of six) was developed out of and embedded within a series of action research cycles. The study is presented in two phases (interviews and field observation); the approach incorporates Goffman's frame analysis to identify whether espoused aspects of educational leadership would manifest if given the opportunity, and whether the principles of Bordieuan “values” placed by the participants on educational leadership would be a useful lever to support change.

Findings

The study findings demonstrated educational leadership can be inculcated and actioned by creating real life frames and reinforced through association with those already considered to be world leaders.

Research limitations/implications

The numbers of participants in this qualitative study limit the finding to an non‐generalisable population, suggestions for future research include replication of the principles of transfer to other contexts.

Practical implications

Practical implications from this research include identification of activities that will encourage change agent and leadership activities that are designed to impact on organisational performance.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper relates to identifying barriers to leadership in two different contexts (fields) and using frames to overcome these barriers to performance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1972

SCIENTISTS and sociologists have for some time been gravely disquieted about the impact which modern technology is making upon society; a disquiet which has recently been…

Abstract

SCIENTISTS and sociologists have for some time been gravely disquieted about the impact which modern technology is making upon society; a disquiet which has recently been percolating through wider sections of all communities. Man has always recognized, since the first machine usurped the place of the human hand as the tool of production, that progress does good but brings harm in its wake, although it is not as quickly appreciated.

Details

Work Study, vol. 21 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1943

F.R. Shanley

IN so far as it is possible under wartime restrictions, the purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive picture of the more important problems in aircraft…

Abstract

IN so far as it is possible under wartime restrictions, the purpose of this paper is to present a comprehensive picture of the more important problems in aircraft structural design and research in the interest of advancing the knowledge of those engaged in industries which formerly had but slight connexion with aeronautical engineering, but today are deeply involved in various phases of aircraft work. A similar objective was stated by Dr. A. G. Pugsley as follows:

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Dmitry Shlapentokh

Looks at the reasons for the collapse of both regimes and considers the importance of repression with these developments. Contrasts the methods of Imperial Russia with the…

Abstract

Looks at the reasons for the collapse of both regimes and considers the importance of repression with these developments. Contrasts the methods of Imperial Russia with the Bolsheviks looking at Court proceedings, prison conditions, education and propaganda in prison, exile and the secret police. Concludes that whilst social support is usually seen as essential for survival of a system, repression is not regarded as a positive element but can become the method for a system’s survival and stability.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 19 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Rachel Ashworth, Tom Entwistle, Julian Gould‐Williams and Michael Marinetto

This monograph contains abstracts from the 2005 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference Cardiff Business School,Cardiff University, 6‐7th September 2005

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Abstract

This monograph contains abstracts from the 2005 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University, 6‐7th September 2005

Details

Management Research News, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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