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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2022

Melanie Stephens, Lydia Hubbard, Siobhan Kelly, Andrew Clark and Lorna Chesterton

The purpose of this paper is to report on an interprofessional (IPE) student training scheme recently conducted in three care homes across the Northwest of England. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on an interprofessional (IPE) student training scheme recently conducted in three care homes across the Northwest of England. The intervention was designed as a feasibility study to explore the impacts such schemes have on residents, students and care home staff. Additional lessons emerged that contribute to the design and direction of future IPE initiatives in other care homes and care settings.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study outlines how the intervention was designed and implemented and the findings from its evaluation. This paper uses Biggs’ (1993) presage–process–product framework to evaluate the process of setting up care homes as a site of collaborative learning.

Findings

Collaborative working between stakeholders is necessary for the successful implementation of IPE in care home settings. The process is complex and requires communication and commitment across all levels of engagement. For this model to grow and have a beneficial impact on older people’s lives, there are layered factors to consider, such as the socio-political context, the characteristics of the individuals who participate and diverse approaches to learning.

Research limitations/implications

This case study reports the subjective views of the research collaborators. While this raises the potential for bias, it presents an “insider” perspective of the research process and offers learning that might be beneficial in efforts to run future IPE training schemes.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no other research studies or published interventions have been identified that explicitly address the experiences of implementing an IPE training scheme in UK care home settings. This paper will therefore be useful to academic researchers, individuals managing student placements and to health and social care staff who wish to learn about of the value of IPE learning schemes.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 January 2023

Martin Powell

This paper examines different perspectives on the broad umbrella term of organisational silence. It identifies ten perspectives on organisational silence from the previous…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines different perspectives on the broad umbrella term of organisational silence. It identifies ten perspectives on organisational silence from the previous literature on inquiries into failings of British National Health Service providers. The purpose of this paper is to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using content analysis, it applies ten perspectives on organisational silence to the report of the inquiry into the Gosport Hospital.

Findings

There is some overlap between the perspectives in that they draw on the same authors, and stress similar issues. There is some evidence for most of the perspectives in the report, but some perspectives appear stronger than others. However, none of the perspectives seem to cover the full spectrum of behaviour and place differential emphasis on different processes. It is not clear whether all ten perspectives add independent analytical value. This suggests that some might be extended or combined with the umbrella term of organisational silence more fully opened.

Originality/value

This is the first study in healthcare to review perspectives on organisational silence and apply them to a case study.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Hannah Catherine Spring, Fiona Katherine Howlett, Claire Connor, Ashton Alderson, Joe Antcliff, Kimberley Dutton, Oliva Gray, Emily Hirst, Zeba Jabeen, Myra Jamil, Sally Mattimoe and Siobhan Waister

Asylum seekers and refugees experience substantial barriers to successful transition to a new society. The purpose of this paper is to explore the value and meaning of a community…

1463

Abstract

Purpose

Asylum seekers and refugees experience substantial barriers to successful transition to a new society. The purpose of this paper is to explore the value and meaning of a community drop-in service offering social support for refugees and asylum seekers in the northeast of England and to identify the occupational preferences of the service users.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews was conducted with refugees and asylum seekers using a community drop-in service. In total, 18 people participated from ten countries. Data were analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis.

Findings

The value and meaning of the service was expressed through four key areas: the need to experience a sense of community; being able to make an altruistic contribution within the community; the need for societal integration; and having the opportunity to engage in meaningful and productive occupations.

Practical implications

Community and altruism have profound cultural meaning for asylum seekers and refugees and the need to integrate, belong and contribute is paramount to successful resettlement. Community-based drop-in services can aid this at deep, culturally relevant levels. This study may inform policy and practice development, future service development and highlight potential opportunities for health and social care services provision amongst this growing population.

Originality/value

To date there are no studies that provide empirical evidence on how community-based drop-in services for refugees and asylum seekers are received. This study provides a cultural insight into the deeper value and meaning of such services, and is particularly relevant for professionals in all sectors who are working with asylum seekers and refugees.

Details

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9894

Keywords

Abstract

Purpose

To identify transitional palliative care (TPC) interventions for older adults with non-malignant chronic diseases and complex conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review of the literature was conducted. CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Embase and Pubmed databases were searched for studies reporting TPC interventions for older adults, published between 2002 and 2019. The Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool was used for quality appraisal.

Findings

A total of six studies were included. Outcomes related to TPC interventions were grouped into three categories: healthcare system-related outcomes (rehospitalisation, length of stay [LOS] and emergency department [ED] visits), patient-related outcomes and family/carer important outcomes. Overall, TPC interventions were associated with lower readmission rates and LOS, improved quality of life and better decision-making concerning hospice care among families. Outcomes for ED visits were unclear.

Research limitations/implications

Positive outcomes related to healthcare services (including readmissions and LOS), patients (quality of life) and families (decision-making) were reported. However, the number of studies supporting the evidence were limited.

Originality/value

Studies examining the effectiveness of existing care models to support transitions for those in need of palliative care are limited. This systematic literature review identified and appraised interventions aimed at improving transitions to palliative care in older adults with advanced non-malignant diseases or frailty.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2011

Siobhan O'Mahony and Karim R. Lakhani

The concept of a community form is drawn upon in many subfields of organizational theory. Although there is not much convergence on a level of analysis, there is convergence on a…

Abstract

The concept of a community form is drawn upon in many subfields of organizational theory. Although there is not much convergence on a level of analysis, there is convergence on a mode of action that is increasingly relevant to a knowledge-based economy marked by porous and shifting organizational boundaries. We argue that communities play an underappreciated role in organizational theory – critical not only to occupational identity, knowledge transfer, sense-making, social support, innovation, problem-solving, and collective action but also, enabled by information technology, increasingly providing socioeconomic value – in areas once inhabited by organizations alone. Hence, we posit that organizations may be in the shadow of communities. Rather than push for a common definition, we link communities to an organization's evolution: its birth, growth, and death. We show that communities represent both opportunities and threats to organizations and conclude with a research agenda that more fully accounts for the potential of community forms to be a creator (and a possible destroyer) of value for organizations.

Details

Communities and Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-284-5

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Margaret O'Rourke, Sean Hammond, David O'Sullivan, Ciara Staunton and Siobhan O'Brien

LifeMatters is a cognitive behavioural coaching programme that provides tools and techniques for developing and applying five areas of life skill competency: taking care of the…

Abstract

Purpose

LifeMatters is a cognitive behavioural coaching programme that provides tools and techniques for developing and applying five areas of life skill competency: taking care of the body, feeling positive, thinking wisely, acting wisely, and taking care of the spirit. The purpose of paper is to evaluate the viability of the LifeMatters programme with a cohort of secondary school students (12-15 years) in Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

Open-ended feedback obtained from 196 participants who completed an open-ended questionnaire. These responses were subjected to a thematic analysis. Subsequent quantitative analysis of the resulting categorical data were carried out using correspondence analysis.

Findings

Categorical analysis produced statistically significant sex and age differences showing that males and females differed in their experience of the programme. Girls benefited more from a focus upon stress and self-confidence whereas boys benefited more from a focus on relationship building.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the viability of the LifeMatters programme for secondary school students as an aid to develop life skills. It highlights the different needs of boys and girls in this area.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2022

Petra Nordqvist and Leah Gilman

Abstract

Details

Donors
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-564-3

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Siobhán O'Higgins, Jane Sixsmith and Saoirse Nic Gabhainn

The shared language of youth includes understandings of concepts that can be different from those of adults. Researchers, in their efforts to explore and illuminate the health…

1654

Abstract

Purpose

The shared language of youth includes understandings of concepts that can be different from those of adults. Researchers, in their efforts to explore and illuminate the health behaviours and decision‐making processes of young people, use generic terms in their data collecting protocols. This study aims to explore what adolescents understand by the words “healthy” and “happy”.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were conducted in three post‐primary schools with 31 students aged 12 and 13 years. Drawing on a grounded theory approach, interviews were transcribed and subjected to thematic content analysis.

Findings

The students provided a description and explanation of what health and happiness meant to them and how they intended to maintain both as they grew older. Perceptions of these two concepts were found to contain gendered nuances. This was clear in relation to descriptions of how friends were part of well‐being; the girls were more likely to talk about feeling restricted and resentment at being treated like children and only the boys talked of looking forward to things.

Originality/value

In order to gain an understanding of young people's perspectives about what matters and what influences their health behaviour, a clearer view of the different perspectives held by researcher and researched needs to be established so that more accurate conclusions can be drawn from data generated by young people.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Politicization of Mumsnet
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-468-2

Book part
Publication date: 9 March 2023

Beth Fielding-Lloyd and Donna Woodhouse

Launched in 2011, the Women's Super League (WSL) has raised the media profile of women's football in England, benefitted from greater sponsorship investment and signalled, for the…

Abstract

Launched in 2011, the Women's Super League (WSL) has raised the media profile of women's football in England, benefitted from greater sponsorship investment and signalled, for the first time, a more co-ordinated effort by the Football Association (FA) to develop the game from grassroots to international level. However, whilst the FA's insistence that the WSL's future is best secured by clubs aligning themselves with male ‘parent’ clubs has led to more buy-in from English Premier League (EPL) clubs, some historically established women's clubs have been excluded from the highest echelons of the sport or even folded. Clubs' heavy reliance of volunteerism has been retained and salaries, even for internationally capped players, remain modest. There have been criticisms of player welfare (Taylor, 2018b), inadequate support for players' facing racist and sexist abuse (Gornall & Magowan, 2019), poor support for competition structuring (Wrack, 2018a) and a marketing strategy that is centred on heteronormative notions of family (Fielding-Lloyd, Woodhouse, & Sequerra, 2018). Popular discourses have heralded the professionalisation of women's football as evidence of significant progress in gender equality in the sport and as signposting an unequivocally positive future for the game. This chapter will critically assess the FA's conceptualisations of WSL as a neo-liberal project that has not consistently worked in the best interests of all players, clubs and fans and examine the FA's commitment to, and responsibility for, the development of the female game at elite club level.

Details

Women’s Football in a Global, Professional Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-053-5

Keywords

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