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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

Axel Kaehne

Big Data is likely to have significant implications for the way in which services are planned, organised or delivered as well as the way in which we evaluate them. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Big Data is likely to have significant implications for the way in which services are planned, organised or delivered as well as the way in which we evaluate them. The increase in data availability creates particular challenges for evaluators in the field of integrated care and the purpose of this paper is to set out how we may usefully reframe these challenges in the longer term.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the characteristics of Big Data as defined in the literature, the paper develops a narrative around the data and research design challenges and how they influence evaluation studies in the field of care integration.

Findings

Big Data will have significant implications for how we conduct integrated care evaluations. In particular, dynamic modelling and study designs capable of accommodating new epistemic foundations for the phenomena of social organisations, such as emergence and feedback loops, are likely to be most helpful. Big Data also generates opportunities for exploratory data analysis approaches, as opposed to static model development and testing. Evaluators may find research designs useful that champion realist approaches or single-n designs.

Originality/value

This paper reflects on the emerging literature and changing practice of data generation and data use in health care. It draws on organisational theory and outlines implications of Big Data for evaluating care integration initiatives.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Brian O'Neill, Catherine Best, Alex Gillespie and Lauren O'Neill

The purpose of this paper is to test the efficacy of an interactive verbal prompting technology (Guide) on supporting the morning routine. Data have already established…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the efficacy of an interactive verbal prompting technology (Guide) on supporting the morning routine. Data have already established the efficacy of such prompting during procedural tasks, but the efficacy of such prompting in tasks with procedural and motivational elements remains unexamined. Such tasks, such as getting out of bed in the morning and engaging in personal care, are often the focus of rehabilitation goals.

Design/methodology/approach

A single‐n study with a male (age 61) who had severe cognitive impairment and was having trouble completing the morning routine. An A−B−A′−B′−A″−B″ design was used, with the intervention phase occurring both in an in‐patient unit (B, B′) and in the participant's own home (B″).

Findings

Interactive verbal prompting technology (Guide) significantly reduced support worker prompting and number of errors in the in‐patient setting and in the participant's own home.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that interactive verbal prompting can be used to support motivational tasks such as getting out of bed and the morning routine. This study used a single subject experimental design and the results need to be confirmed in a larger sample.

Originality/value

This is the first report of use of interactive verbal prompting technology to support rehabilitation of a motivational task. It is also the first study to evaluate Guide in a domestic context.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Wei Liu, Zhaoyang Guo and Rui Chen

This study aims to examine how loneliness, romantic relationship status (single/non-single) and romantic attachment factors (sociosexual orientation index (SOI)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how loneliness, romantic relationship status (single/non-single) and romantic attachment factors (sociosexual orientation index (SOI), satisfaction with current relationship) interactively affect conspicuous consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Five quasi-experimental studies were conducted with different measures of conspicuous consumption across a variety of samples (N = 1189).

Findings

Study 1 shows that loneliness increased singles’ but not non-singles’ conspicuous consumption. Study 2A further shows the mediating role of the mating motive amongst singles. Study 2B compared conspicuous and inconspicuous consumption and showed no interaction effect between loneliness and romantic relationship status in the domain of inconspicuous consumption. Studies 3 and 4 tested whether the effects of loneliness on non-singles’ conspicuous consumption were moderated by SOI and satisfaction with current relationship, respectively. Specifically, lonely non-singles with high SOI or low satisfaction with current relationship sought conspicuous consumption, but those with low SOI or high satisfaction with the current relationship avoided conspicuous consumption.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not specifically consider different roots of loneliness (lack of romantic love, friendship or family attachment) between singles and non-singles, which future research should explore.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for both marketers and policymakers regarding marketing campaigns for conspicuous products, support programmes satisfying the specific social attachment needs of different lonely people, etc.

Originality/value

This study identifies a specific social attachment desire of the lonely, namely, romantic motive, by which loneliness influences singles’ and non-singles’ conspicuous consumption in different ways. The findings suggest the value of distinguishing types of loneliness.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

DAVID ELLIS, JONATHAN FURNER‐HINES and PETER WILLETT

An important stage in the process of retrieval of objects from a hypertext database is the creation of a set of inter‐nodal links that are intended to represent the…

Abstract

An important stage in the process of retrieval of objects from a hypertext database is the creation of a set of inter‐nodal links that are intended to represent the relationships existing between objects; this operation is often undertaken manually, just as index terms are often manually assigned to documents in a conventional retrieval system. Studies of conventional systems have suggested that a degree of consistency in the terms assigned to documents by indexers is positively associated with retrieval effectiveness. It is thus of interest to investigate the consistency of assignment of links in separate hypertext versions of the same full‐text document, since a measure of agreement may be related to the subsequent utility of the resulting hypertext databases. The calculation of values indicating the degree of similarity between objects is a technique that has been widely used in the fields of textual and chemical information retrieval; in this paper, we describe the application of arithmetic coefficients and topological indices to the measurement of the degree of similarity between the sets of inter‐nodal links in hypertext databases. We publish the results of a study in which several different sets of links are inserted, by different people, between the paragraphs of each of a number of full‐text documents. Our results show little similarity between the sets of links identified by different people; this finding is comparable with those of studies of inter‐indexer consistency, where it has been found that there is generally only a low level of agreement between the sets of index terms assigned to a document by different indexers.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Dvora Yanow

The purpose of this paper is to assess the myths and challenges in the field of organizational ethnography and methodological angst.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the myths and challenges in the field of organizational ethnography and methodological angst.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is initially written as an invited keynote address for the 3rd Annual Joint Symposium on “Current Developments in Ethnographic Research in the Social and Management Sciences” (University of Liverpool Management School and Keele University Institute for Public Policy and Management, Liverpool, September 3‐5, 2008). It explores what might be distinctive about organizational ethnography and how that might be different from “anthropological” ethnography. In particular, it engages a kind of collective methodological performance anxiety among organizational studies scholars without formal training in anthropology who do ethnographic research.

Findings

The paper argues that it is time to be explicit about a variety of forms of professional angst that many ethnographic researchers within organizational studies carry which have not been discussed.

Originality/value

The paper is of value to those willing to consider the myths and challenges that need engaging and perhaps uprooting and casting off.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Rory Francis Mulcahy, Rebekah Russell-Bennett, Nadia Zainuddin and Kerri-Ann Kuhn

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to extend transformative service and social marketing practitioners’ and academics’ understanding of how gamification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to extend transformative service and social marketing practitioners’ and academics’ understanding of how gamification and serious m-games are designed, and second, to model the effects of game design elements on key transformative service and social marketing outcomes, satisfaction, knowledge, and behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a two-study, mixed-method research design, encompassing focus groups (n=21) and online surveys (n=497), using four current marketplace serious m-games. Study 1 was qualitative and the data were analysed in two cycles using an inductive and deductive approach. Study 2 was quantitative and the data were analysed using PLS-SEM.

Findings

The qualitative results of Study 1 discovered a framework of five game design elements for serious m-games. In Study 2, a conceptual model and hypothesised relationships were tested at a full sample level and by each serious m-game. Results show different significant relationships for each serious m-game and moderate to high levels of explanation for satisfaction and knowledge, and low to high levels of explained variance for behavioural intentions. The findings are therefore not only robust across four different serious m-games, but also demonstrate the nuances of the relationships.

Originality/value

This research contributes to two service research priorities: leveraging technology to advance services, and improving well-being through transformative services. This research demonstrates that gamification through serious m-games is one form of technology that can be designed to create a satisfying and knowledge-creating service experience, which can also influence intentions to perform health and well-being behaviours.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Huong Ha and Vanvela Vanaphuti

This study aims to examine factors that affect the effectiveness of transfer of English language training to the workplace. It investigates the effect of trainee…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine factors that affect the effectiveness of transfer of English language training to the workplace. It investigates the effect of trainee characteristics, training design and work climate on the training transfer to job performance in hospitals in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative method was adopted in this study. The conceptual framework was developed from Lim and Morris’ three-factor model, namely, trainee characteristics, training design and work climate. A total of 378 valid responses from staff of seven hospitals in Thailand were collected from surveys.

Findings

The findings suggest that training transfer depends more on trainees’ psychological state (affective response and self-efficacy) than extrinsic factors. Nearly every aspect of training design could affect training transfer, except trainer effectiveness. This could be related to the particular context of training and the trainees’ prior experience. Work climate factors had the strongest overall effect, with peer and supervisor feedback, compensation and incentives and transfer opportunities being significant.

Originality/value

This study proposes that training design and work climate-related factors deserve more attention than what they have received previously. This study is significant because of the limited empirical evidence for English training transfer outcomes, and the under-examined role of English as a lingua franca in the business world. The findings can help organisations refine training designs and adjust the work environment to improve training outcomes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1944

A.G. Pugsley

IN aeronautical work the general engineering outlook in regard to the specification of strength factors has been supplemented by an appreciation of the unusually variable…

Abstract

IN aeronautical work the general engineering outlook in regard to the specification of strength factors has been supplemented by an appreciation of the unusually variable nature of the loads coming upon the aeroplane structure. The two questions have generally been treated as separate ones, and it is only recently that efforts have been made to bring them together by relating both to accident rates. In doing so we have on the one hand to allow for the frequency of occurrence of loads of different magnitudes and on the other hand to allow for the variation in strength among aeroplanes produced to a given design. The purpose of this report is to try, in a preliminary and elementary way, to weld these various aspects of the design of aeroplane structures into a logical and consistent whole—a philosophy of strength factors —and, by so doing, to reduce accident rates, to bring into better perspective some of our past problems, to point to ways of further development, and to prepare for making the fullest use of the speed and acceleration loading statistics now accumulating.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Pradeep Kumar Rathore, Brishbhan Singh Panwar and Jamil Akhtar

The present paper aims to propose a basic current mirror-sensing circuit as an alternative to the traditional Wheatstone bridge circuit for the design and development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to propose a basic current mirror-sensing circuit as an alternative to the traditional Wheatstone bridge circuit for the design and development of high-sensitivity complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)–microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-integrated pressure sensors.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates a novel current mirror-sensing-based CMOS–MEMS-integrated pressure-sensing structure based on the piezoresistive effect in metal oxide field effect transistor (MOSFET). A resistive loaded n-channel MOSFET-based current mirror pressure-sensing circuitry has been designed using 5-μm CMOS technology. The pressure-sensing structure consists of three identical 10-μm-long and 50-μm-wide n-channel MOSFETs connected in current mirror configuration, with its input transistor as a reference MOSFET and output transistors are the pressure-sensing MOSFETs embedded at the centre and near the fixed edge of a silicon diaphragm measuring 100 × 100 × 2.5 μm. This arrangement of MOSFETs enables the sensor to sense tensile and compressive stresses, developed in the diaphragm under externally applied pressure, with respect to the input reference transistor of the mirror circuit. An analytical model describing the complete behaviour of the integrated pressure sensor has been described. The simulation results of the pressure sensor show high pressure sensitivity and a good agreement with the theoretical model has been observed. A five mask level process flow for the fabrication of the current mirror-sensing-based pressure sensor has also been described. An n-channel MOSFET with aluminium gate was fabricated to verify the fabrication process and obtain its electrical characteristics using process and device simulation software. In addition, an aluminium gate metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitor was fabricated on a two-inch p-type silicon wafer and its CV characteristic curve was also measured experimentally. Finally, the paper presents a comparative study between the current mirror pressure-sensing circuit with the traditional Wheatstone bridge.

Findings

The simulated sensitivities of the pressure-sensing MOSFETs of the current mirror-integrated pressure sensor have been found to be approximately 375 and 410 mV/MPa with respect to the reference transistor, and approximately 785 mV/MPa with respect to each other. The highest pressure sensitivities of a quarter, half and full Wheatstone bridge circuits were found to be approximately 183, 366 and 738 mV/MPa, respectively. These results clearly show that the current mirror pressure-sensing circuit is comparable and better than the traditional Wheatstone bridge circuits.

Originality/value

The concept of using a basic current mirror circuit for sensing tensile and compressive stresses developed in micro-mechanical structures is new, fully compatible to standard CMOS processes and has a promising application in the development of miniaturized integrated micro-sensors and sensor arrays for automobile, medical and industrial applications.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

REBECCA GREEN

The expression of conceptual syntagmatic relationships in document retrieval systems holds out hope for both increased discrimination (generally) and increased recall (in…

Abstract

The expression of conceptual syntagmatic relationships in document retrieval systems holds out hope for both increased discrimination (generally) and increased recall (in certain contexts). The inclusion of such relationships in retrieval systems requires both a structured inventory of relationships and some means of expressing them; this article examines the latter. To be fully effective, the expression of conceptual syntagmatic relationships must comply with criteria of systematicity, complexity, efficiency and naturalness. Unfortunately, the complex interaction of natural language means of expressing these relationships (lexicalisation, word order, function words and morphosyntactic cases) causes them to fail the systematicity criterion. Most document retrieval system means of expressing conceptual syntagmatic relationships (as exemplified by various term co‐occurrence techniques, links and role indicators) fail to comply with this and other of the criteria. Only gestalt structures simultaneously representing relationships, participants and roles (for example, frames) conform fully to the criterial checklist.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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