Search results

1 – 10 of over 24000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Tessel Bogaard, Laura Hollink, Jan Wielemaker, Jacco van Ossenbruggen and Lynda Hardman

For digital libraries, it is useful to understand how users search in a collection. Investigating search patterns can help them to improve the user interface, collection…

Abstract

Purpose

For digital libraries, it is useful to understand how users search in a collection. Investigating search patterns can help them to improve the user interface, collection management and search algorithms. However, search patterns may vary widely in different parts of a collection. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how to identify these search patterns within a well-curated historical newspaper collection using the existing metadata.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors analyzed search logs combined with metadata records describing the content of the collection, using this metadata to create subsets in the logs corresponding to different parts of the collection.

Findings

The study shows that faceted search is more prevalent than non-faceted search in terms of number of unique queries, time spent, clicks and downloads. Distinct search patterns are observed in different parts of the collection, corresponding to historical periods, geographical regions or subject matter.

Originality/value

First, this study provides deeper insights into search behavior at a fine granularity in a historical newspaper collection, by the inclusion of the metadata in the analysis. Second, it demonstrates how to use metadata categorization as a way to analyze distinct search patterns in a collection.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Nicola Roberts and Heaven Marsh

It is recommended that universities implement bystander interventions to disrupt the interpersonal violence and abuse that students experience in this context. Yet, there…

Abstract

Purpose

It is recommended that universities implement bystander interventions to disrupt the interpersonal violence and abuse that students experience in this context. Yet, there are few evaluations of bystander interventions in the UK. Building on an existing evaluation carried out on a bystander intervention at a university in 2017/18, the purpose of this research was to evaluate the intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a one-way repeated measures design, analysis of variance was used to analyse pre- and post-intervention data gathered from 121 students, during 2018/19.

Findings

As the aims of the session were met, it can be inferred individuals who participate in the bystander intervention have the potential to disrupt interpersonal violence and abuse.

Research limitations/implications

The small sample size and design of the survey limited the research. Further evaluations of bystander interventions are needed in the UK that utilises large samples and a validated survey.

Practical implications

This paper notes the importance of engaging many students in a cohort to participate on a bystander intervention.

Originality/value

This study adds to the paucity of evaluations of bystander interventions in the UK. Knowing that the intervention has the potential to disrupt interpersonal violence and abuse builds the momentum for other similarly designed interventions to be implemented in universities in the UK.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Giulio Lancioni, Nirbhay Singh, Mark O’Reilly, Jeff Sigafoos, Fiora D’Amico, Dominga Laporta, Antonella Scordamaglia and Katia Pinto

Music stimulation is considered beneficial for people with advanced Alzheimer’s disease. The purpose of this paper is to assess a tablet-based program to promote…

Abstract

Purpose

Music stimulation is considered beneficial for people with advanced Alzheimer’s disease. The purpose of this paper is to assess a tablet-based program to promote music-related hand responses and positive engagement (e.g. singing or moving the body with the music) in people with advanced Alzheimer’s disease.

Design/methodology/approach

The program was implemented with 20 participants according to a non-concurrent multiple baseline design across participants. The participants were provided with a tablet whose screen worked as a sensor. During the intervention, sensor activations by hand responses led the tablet to present 10 s segments of preferred songs; an absence of sensor activation led the tablet to produce a prompt.

Findings

The participants’ mean frequencies of hand responses (i.e. sensor activations) per 5 min session increased from mostly zero during baseline to between about 9 and 20 during the intervention. The mean percentages of observation intervals with participants’ positive engagement increased from 0 to 12 during the baseline to between 13 and 55 during the intervention. The differences between baseline and intervention data were statistically significant for all participants.

Originality/value

A tablet-based program, such as that used in this study, may help people with advanced Alzheimer’s disease develop specific music-related responses and positive engagement.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

W.A. Rasika Nandana and W.R. de Mel

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an integrated laboratory experiment setup (ILES) to overcome problems encountered in open distance learning (ODL) especially when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an integrated laboratory experiment setup (ILES) to overcome problems encountered in open distance learning (ODL) especially when offering engineering degree programmes.

Design/methodology/approach

Engineering laboratory experiments can be classified as experiments which are performed with the intention to inculcate theory, and second, to provide hands-on experience. The ILES integrates both types of experiments with face-to-face laboratory (FFL), online remote laboratory (ORL), and multimedia demonstrations, and it helps to reduce traditional FFL duration by 50 per cent. The first phase of the ILES provides an opportunity to refer multimedia demonstrations of the experiments. Thereafter, students attend the first FFL session, which covers about 25 per cent of the experiments. In the next step, 50 per cent of the experiments are offered using the ORL, via the internet while interacting with real equipment and making actual observations. The final step is used to accomplish the rest of the experiments (25 per cent) in FFL which facilitates the clarification of any problem that may occur in the ORL.

Findings

This blended laboratory system will help to achieve ODL objectives while utilising resources productively and cost effectively. Having implemented the idea and based on the information received from the stakeholders, this has proved to be a workable solution to one of the difficulties faced by ODL students.

Research limitations/implications

The level of outcome of the students has to be observed and analysed in comparison with the traditional laboratory setup.

Practical implications

Some experiments (e.g. thermodynamics) which need more safety precautions are difficult to offer via ORL.

Originality/value

The ILES is a blended setup including FFL, ORL and multimedia demonstrations and it is a novel concept which is most applicable to engineering/science programmes offered in ODL mode.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2021

Rachel Wishkoski, Katie Strand, Alex Sundt, Deanna Allred and Diana J. Meter

This mixed-methods study assesses a pilot library curriculum in a general education English composition course. Case-based learning (CBL), a form of problem-based learning…

Abstract

Purpose

This mixed-methods study assesses a pilot library curriculum in a general education English composition course. Case-based learning (CBL), a form of problem-based learning (PBL), was used to scaffold information literacy skills and concepts across sessions. This article explores the approach's impact on student learning and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were enrolled in four sections of an undergraduate composition course. Two sections were taught with the CBL library curriculum, and two with the standard library curriculum as a control. Pretest/posttest surveys included quantitative and qualitative measures to assess students in several areas of information literacy. Weekly reflections from a subsample of students were analyzed, and the research team conducted structured classroom observations and teaching reflections.

Findings

Quantitative survey results did not support the hypotheses that the CBL curriculum would increase students' confidence and skill levels compared to their control section peers. Although there was no significant difference between sections in measured information literacy outcomes, students generally agreed that the case studies used in the CBL curriculum taught skills applicable to their research. Teaching observation data revealed the cohesion of the curriculum across library sessions and increased student engagement in classroom activities. However, some of the case studies could be improved, and some limitations in study design point to the need for further research.

Originality/value

This study addresses a gap in the literature through a mixed-methods assessment of CBL pedagogy using a control group, contributing to an understanding of the role of PBL pedagogies in information literacy curricula.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Dominik Jung, Marc Adam, Verena Dorner and Anuja Hariharan

Human lab experiments have become an established method in information systems research for investigating user behavior, perception and even neurophysiology. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Human lab experiments have become an established method in information systems research for investigating user behavior, perception and even neurophysiology. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate experimental research by providing a practical guide on how to implement and conduct lab experiments in the freely available experimental platform Brownie.

Design/methodology/approach

Laying the groundwork of the tutorial, the paper first provides a brief overview of common design considerations for lab experiments and a generic session framework. Building on the use case of the widely used trust game, the paper then covers the different stages involved in running an experimental session and maps the conceptual elements of the study design to the implementation of the experimental software.

Findings

The paper generates findings on how computerized lab experiments can be designed and implemented. Furthermore, it maps out the design considerations an experimenter may take into account when implementing an experiment and organizing it along a session structure (e.g. participant instructions, individual and group interaction, state and trait questionnaires).

Originality/value

The paper reduces barriers for researchers to engage in experiment implementation and replication by providing a step-by-step tutorial for the design and implementation of human lab experiments.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 19 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Pejman Goudarzi

The main purpose of the current work is high quality video transmission over cognitive radio wireless networks.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of the current work is high quality video transmission over cognitive radio wireless networks.

Design/methodology/approach

A soft computing technique based on fuzzy logic concept is introduced that can reduce the blocking probability and increase the perceived quality of video users.

Findings

It is found that by using soft computing techniques it is possible to increase the perceived quality and reduce the blocking probability in cognitive radio networks for secondary video users.

Originality/value

The main originality of this paper is twofold: at first the design philosophy in admission is quality of experience centric and second, soft computing techniques are used to decrease the blocking probability in cognitive networks.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Tichatonga J. Nhundu

A survey of the literature will undoubtedly show that the last two decades have witnessed a proliferation of research studies on occupational stress among educational…

Abstract

A survey of the literature will undoubtedly show that the last two decades have witnessed a proliferation of research studies on occupational stress among educational personnel, and that interest in this area has not abated. Unfortunately, little is known about occupational stress in many developing societies because a preponderance of these studies have been carried out in industrialized and developed societies where conditions may be dissimilar to those obtaining in developing societies. Therefore, the current study sought to contribute to a better understanding of occupational stress in teaching by investigating the sources, incidence and intensity of administrative stress among headteachers in Zimbabwe. The results of a survey of a sample of 95 headteachers showed that the sample experienced relatively high levels of administrative stress compared with previous findings. In addition, the study revealed several demographic characteristics and school variables which influenced the respondents’ perceptions of situations which cause stress. Finally, implications of the study were discussed in terms of policy, preparation of school administrators, school management and future research.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 April 2018

Hooria Jazaieri

The purpose of this paper is to make the case for bringing compassion to students in educational settings, preschool through graduate school (PK-20).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make the case for bringing compassion to students in educational settings, preschool through graduate school (PK-20).

Design/methodology/approach

First, the author defines what is meant by “compassion” and differentiates it from the related constructs. Next, the author discusses the importance of bringing compassion into education, thinking specifically about preschool, K-12 (elementary and middle school/junior high/high school), college students, and graduate students (e.g. law, medical, nurses, counselors and therapists-in-training). The author then reviews the scant empirical literature on compassion in education and makes recommendations for future research. In the final section, the author makes specific and practical recommendations for the classroom (e.g. how to teach and evaluate compassion in PK-20).

Findings

While there is a fair amount of research on compassion with college students, and specifically regarding compassion for oneself, as the author reviews in this paper, the field is wide open in terms of empirical research with other students and examining other forms of compassion.

Research limitations/implications

This is not a formal review or meta-analysis.

Practical implications

This paper will be a useful resource for teachers and those interested in PK-20 education.

Social implications

This paper highlights the problems and opportunities for bringing compassion into education settings.

Originality/value

To date, no review of compassion in PK-20 exists.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1977

HEAR what Mr. Les Huckfield has to say. Why? Because he is the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Department of Industry. “Britain's potential for becoming a very…

Abstract

HEAR what Mr. Les Huckfield has to say. Why? Because he is the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Department of Industry. “Britain's potential for becoming a very great industrial nation exists; we have the ideas, the men and women to put them into practice; all we need is the will to succeed.”

Details

Work Study, vol. 26 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

1 – 10 of over 24000