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Book part
Publication date: 18 March 2021

J. Yoon Irons and Grenville Hancox

Abstract

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Singing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-332-1

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Abstract

Details

Singing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-332-1

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Singing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-332-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 March 2021

J. Yoon Irons and Grenville Hancox

Abstract

Details

Singing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-332-1

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Singing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-332-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Laetitia Livesey, Ian Morrison, Stephen Clift and Paul Camic

The aim of this study is to explore the benefits of choral singing for mental wellbeing and health as perceived by a cross‐national sample of amateur choral singers.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore the benefits of choral singing for mental wellbeing and health as perceived by a cross‐national sample of amateur choral singers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data consisted of written responses to open‐ended questions. These were derived from 169 participants selected from a larger dataset reporting high and low levels of emotional wellbeing on the WHOQOL‐BREF questionnaire. A majority of participants were female and aged over 50. A thematic analysis was followed by a content analysis and Pearson chi square analyses. Comparisons were made between different ages, genders and nationalities and participants with high and low reported emotional wellbeing.

Findings

The analysis revealed multiple themes covering perceived benefits in social, emotional, physical, and cognitive domains. There were no significant differences in frequency of themes across any of the participant sociodemographic and wellbeing categories. The results indicate that benefits of singing may be experienced similarly irrespective of age, gender, nationality or wellbeing status.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for further research include future use of validated instruments to measure outcomes and research into the benefits of singing in other cultures. The results of this study suggest that choral singing could be used to promote mental health and treat mental illness.

Originality/value

This study examines a cross‐national sample which is larger than previous studies in this area. These findings contribute to understanding of the complex and interacting factors which might contribute to wellbeing and health, as well as specific benefits of singing.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Sue Hillman

A questionnaire survey was carried out in the Glasgow area in Scotland amongst people over the UK age of statutory retirement participating in the community arts project…

Abstract

A questionnaire survey was carried out in the Glasgow area in Scotland amongst people over the UK age of statutory retirement participating in the community arts project Call That Singing?, with a return rate of 75 per cent. The results demonstrate that participatory singing was perceived as providing worthwhile physical, emotional, social and cultural benefits. Participants reported no overall deterioration in their perception of health over the 12‐year period since the project started: this is despite the high recorded incidence of illness and bereavement during the same period to be expected of people of this age. Participants perceived statistically significant improvements to their general quality of life, emotional wellbeing (including a marginally significant shift in self‐confidence) and understanding of singing. They also reported improvements to their social well‐being, although these were not statistically significant. The research shows that participatory singing is making a contribution to the cultural economy and fabric of the city of Glasgow, illustrated by the increased number of visits to theatres, shows and museums and the increased level of active participation in cultural life.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Stephen Clift, Sharon Manship and Lizzi Stephens

Clift and Morrison (2011) report that weekly singing over eight months for people with enduring mental health issues led to clinically important reductions in mental…

Abstract

Purpose

Clift and Morrison (2011) report that weekly singing over eight months for people with enduring mental health issues led to clinically important reductions in mental distress. The purpose of this paper is to test the robustness of the earlier findings.

Design/methodology/approach

Four community singing groups for people with mental health issues ran weekly from November 2014 to the end of 2015. Evaluation place over a six-month period using two validated questionnaires: the short Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE-10) questionnaire, and the Warwick Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS).

Findings

In all, 26 participants completed baseline and follow-up questionnaires. CORE-10 scores were significantly reduced, and WEMWBS scores significantly increased. Comparisons with the earlier study found a similar pattern of improvements on CORE items that are part of the “problems” sub-scale in the full CORE questionnaire. There was also evidence from both studies of participants showing clinically important improvements in CORE-10 scores.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of the study are a small sample size and the lack of a randomised control group.

Originality/value

No attempts have been made previously to directly test the transferability of a singing for health model to a new geographical area and to evaluate outcomes using the same validated measure.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2011

Stephen Clift and Ian Morrison

This paper aims to describe the development and evaluation of an innovative community singing initiative with mental health services users and supporters in East Kent, UK.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the development and evaluation of an innovative community singing initiative with mental health services users and supporters in East Kent, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A network of seven singing groups was established between September 2009 and June 2010. The choirs met weekly in three terms with breaks for Christmas and Easter, and joined together for two public performances in February and June 2010. In total, 137 participants were involved in the evaluation processes over this period. Of these, 42 provided complete data on the CORE questionnaire, a widely used clinical measure of mental distress, at baseline and eight months later.

Findings

Clinically significant improvements were observed in response to the CORE. These changes, together with qualitative feedback from participants, demonstrate that group singing can have substantial benefits in aiding the recovery of people with a history of serious and enduring mental health problems. A limited body of research has also shown that singing can be helpful for people with existing mental and physical health problems.

Originality/value

The research finds marked improvements in mental wellbeing on a clinically validated measure for people with a range of enduring mental health issues participating in a network of small choirs. Qualitative evidence indicates that group singing can offer a wide range of emotional and social benefits for mental health service users.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Rosie Stacy, Katie Brittain and Sandra Kerr

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways…

Abstract

Singing for health may be an idea whose time has come. The interest in music in relation to health is evident in medical and health‐care research. This paper reviews ways in which music and singing relate to health and healing, historically and cross‐culturally, and shows that music forms a part of the healing systems of many cultures. The paper reviews research on the links between music and health. They include studies that suggest that music has profound effects on the emotions, for example, inducing states of relaxation which are particularly useful as an antidote to depression, anxiety and fatigue. Music has also been shown to enhance physical health through improvements to breathing capacity, muscle tension and posture and the reduction of respiratory symptoms. It may also contribute to social health through the management of self‐identity and interpersonal relationships. The paper explores theories that are beginning to develop about the mechanisms that mediate music for health, including the possible connections between immuno‐suppression, stress reduction, and music. The paper goes on to discuss the role of singing with early years children and community groups of adults. A resurgence of traditional music‐making and voice work in community settings is taking place across the UK, and the paper reviews several community‐based initiatives.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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