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Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Singh Intrachooto

The circular economy has become a significant policy in many countries around the world. In order to achieve a circular economy, wasteful use of resources must be reduced…

Abstract

The circular economy has become a significant policy in many countries around the world. In order to achieve a circular economy, wasteful use of resources must be reduced and waste products from manufacturing must be reintroduced into production systems. It is, however, impossible to totally avoid scraps from the production of most goods. This chapter describes an investigation of current practices of 108 small-and-medium-sized manufacturers (SMEs) regarding their use of solid wastes or scraps. Of particular interest are the scraps generated by SMEs because they comprise 98.5% of all manufacturers in Thailand. Despite concern regarding the growing volume of scraps from production lines, this study collected data from both factory visits and from manufacturers and found that waste reclamation policies among SMEs are rare. Most factory owners resort to selling off-cuts to formal and informal recyclers as well as dumping scraps in the city’s bins. Despite the general recognition of the growing creative industry in Thailand, the use of design has not been considered as a potential solution to this problem by manufacturers. Since failures in scrap reclamation schemes for product designs also hinge on market prospects and opportunities perceived by manufacturers, market strategies in the green economy must be devised. Only then can Thailand achieve circular material flow in its industrial sector.

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Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Singh Intrachooto and Daniel Arons

This article observes how, in today’s common building practice, design practitioners seldom utilize the expertise of researchers in building‐related fields. The lack of…

Abstract

This article observes how, in today’s common building practice, design practitioners seldom utilize the expertise of researchers in building‐related fields. The lack of the collaboration may be due as much to the “applicability gap” between research and practice as to the lack of a clearly defined role of researchers in building design. Most institutions’ research groups and facilities planning offices are generally not set up to collaborate with the design and engineering professionals. This study, however, found design teams’ collaboration with academic and research institutions to be instrumental in the successful development and implementation of technological innovations in architectural projects. It discusses the findings and provides partnership strategies between the institutions, as large‐building owners, and the building professionals, as design providers.

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International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Singh Intrachooto

The lead user concept developed by Eric von Hippel is perhaps the only formal method designed specifically for identifying innovators. This paper discusses the…

Abstract

The lead user concept developed by Eric von Hippel is perhaps the only formal method designed specifically for identifying innovators. This paper discusses the applicability of von Hippel's lead user concept in the architectural industry where technological innovations are necessary yet gravely scarce. In order to examine the applicability of the lead user method, a set of seven case studies of novel energy efficient solutions found in built facilities in Europe and North America were analyzed. The result of the study indicates that the method may not be suitable for identifying the likely source of innovation if the innovation does not focus on an individual's needs; combined efforts are mandatory to create the innovation; and the size and complexity of the innovation make it impossible for a user or an individual to deliver or to test it out on his/her own. The concept of lead provider is introduced and several characteristics are identified.

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The TQM Magazine, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Abstract

Details

Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Robert Crocker, Christopher P. Saint, Guanyi Chen and Yindong Tong

Abstract

Details

Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

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