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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Luh Luh Lan and Jean Lee

Examines the impact of public policies on the entry of women into the workforce in Singapore, using force‐field analysis to study the counteracting forces created by the…

Abstract

Examines the impact of public policies on the entry of women into the workforce in Singapore, using force‐field analysis to study the counteracting forces created by the mixed policies which can either drive or restrain women from entering the job market. Suggests that although there has been an increase in Singapore’s female workforce participation rate in the last few decades, more measures could be devised to encourage more women to participate in the workforce.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2014

Renée Hui Ling Tan

– The paper aims to explore the possibility of advancing a Singaporean way of learning within the continuing education and training landscape in Singapore.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the possibility of advancing a Singaporean way of learning within the continuing education and training landscape in Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the vehicle of a narrative interview and extending the boundaries of autoethnography, the paper uses personal reflection and interpretation to explore the issues of Singaporean identity amidst the diversity in the globalised Singapore of today.

Findings

The paper uncovers the growing latent discomfort of Singaporeans as they navigate historical legacies of Colonialism and question what it means to be schooled in Western systems whilst being Asian. With the supplanting of Asian languages and the seeming superiority and dominance of Western talent, systems and knowledge, Singaporeans are looking to express a greater sense of what being Singaporean could mean.

Social implications

Upon manoeuvring and exposing the invisible, the paper concludes that there is an impetus to forge a “Singaporean way”, although how this would manifest itself is, as yet, unknown.

Originality/value

Although Singapore has a very visible presence globally for its economic achievements, the paper allows for an often under-represented voice of a native Singaporean to be heard. The liberties taken here with the narrative inquiry mode also allow space for a deeper exploration of identity, pride and conflict in a Singaporean today.

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Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 26 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2018

Peter Waring, Christopher Vas and Azad Singh Bali

The purpose of this paper is to assess the efficacy of the policy measures to encourage young Singaporeans to pursue employment in the manufacturing sector while at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the efficacy of the policy measures to encourage young Singaporeans to pursue employment in the manufacturing sector while at the same time discouraging the sector’s traditional dependence on low-cost foreign labour. In doing so, the paper sheds light on the challenges faced by small and medium enterprises (SME) as well as the less than optimum impact the policy rhetoric has had on redirecting the aspirations of young people away from tertiary qualifications attainment and towards vocational skills development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on primary survey data of 222 manufacturing firms and in-depth interviews with 20 SME leaders in Singapore.

Findings

The paper argues that despite the government’s policy efforts to encourage the employment of young Singaporeans in the manufacturing sector, the impact has been negligible. Even with moves to increase the transaction costs of employing foreign workers, the findings indicate that SMEs have not changed their staffing policies. Indeed, the results lay bare the low cost-low skill/low productivity trap that most SMEs now find themselves in. The government’s efforts to discourage the pursuit of tertiary qualifications in favour of vocational qualifications are unlikely to succeed.

Originality/value

The value of this research is fourfold. First, it exposes the difficulty of policy overcoming path dependency. Second, it sheds light on the need for government to rethink its policy approach in how best to re-tool human capital for traditional industry sectors like manufacturing. Third, the results show that there is limited efficacy in simply increasing transaction costs and altering rhetoric to discourage attainment of tertiary qualifications unless vocational employment is adequately remunerated. And finally, the results indicate that firms in the manufacturing sector need to embrace new business models, practices and technologies that are reflective of the digital era to be able to attract youth.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2020

Paul Lim and Andrew Parker

Abstract

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Mentoring Millennials in an Asian Context
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-484-3

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Siu Loon Hoe

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key characteristics and propose a working definition of a smart nation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the key characteristics and propose a working definition of a smart nation.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of Singapore through an analysis of the key speeches made by senior Singapore leaders, publicly available government documents and news reports since the launch of the smart nation initiative in December 2014 was carried out.

Findings

Just like smart cities, the idea of a smart nation is an evolving concept. However, there are some emerging characteristics that define a smart nation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides an initial understanding of the key characteristics and definition of a smart nation at the nascent stage and a foundation for further research on the topic.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing smart cities and smart nation literature by providing insights to the key characteristics of smart nation and proposing a working definition of the term.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Kim-Lim Tan, Tek-Yew Lew and Adriel K.S. Sim

This paper aims to identify a possible solution as to how meaningful work could be considered as a lever in attracting and retaining Generation Y (Gen-Y) employees to work…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify a possible solution as to how meaningful work could be considered as a lever in attracting and retaining Generation Y (Gen-Y) employees to work in the Singapore hotel industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on the perspectives of earlier conceptual papers by Chacko et al. (2012) and Solnet and Hood (2008) in an effort to identify root causes and a possible solution. The context of Singapore and the international literature are also reviewed to establish theoretical and practical gaps that need to be filled.

Findings

The results from this study can be used as a guide to enable hotels to improve the attraction, retention and management of Gen-Y employees. This is crucial in hotels where many properties are facing challenges in attracting and retaining hotel employee talent.

Originality/value

The paper provides a fresh examination of the characteristics and behaviours of Gen-Y employees, as well as suggests an improved organizational approach to attraction and retention. This methodology includes an element of positive psychology, in the form and experience of meaningful work.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Wei Pan, Le Chen and Wenting Zhan

This paper explores the vocational training of construction workers in Guangdong Province of China and identifies its position in the global political-economic spectrum of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the vocational training of construction workers in Guangdong Province of China and identifies its position in the global political-economic spectrum of skill formation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews construction vocational education and training (VET) of major political economies to develop a theoretical framework that guides an in-depth case study of Guangdong. Document analysis, field trip observations, meetings and semi-structured interviews were combined to explore the political-economic environment, political stakeholders and quality assurance mechanisms of industrial training in Guangdong's construction sector. The findings were compared with construction VET of other economies reported in the literature.

Findings

Construction training in Guangdong is deeply rooted in the local history and culture, under strong dominance of the state, while continually evolves to respond to the fluid market and therefore can be conceptualised as “market-in-state”. The political stakeholders are embedded within the state to ensure that skills policies are implemented in-line with industry policies. The differences between the training of Guangdong and its foreign counterparts are attributed to their divergent political-economic models.

Research limitations/implications

As the case study was undertaken only with Guangdong, the generalisability of its findings can be improved through future research within a broader context of multiple provinces of China through both qualitative and quantitative research approaches.

Practical implications

Plausible foreign VET approaches are likely adaptable to the Chinese context only when conducive political-economic environment could be enabled. The findings are useful for developing countries to learn from the VET experience of industrialised economies. Construction workers' training in Guangdong can be improved by strengthening labour regulation at lower subcontracting levels and ensuring the presence of industrial associations and unions for collective training supervision.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the field of construction engineering and management with a theoretical framework that guides empirical studies on the influence of the political-economic environment upon the ways political stakeholders develop and participate in construction VET. The exploration based on this framework revealed the position of the vocational training of construction workers in Guangdong in the global political-economic spectrum of skill formation.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Race and ethnicity continue to divide us. Accurate data on those divisions, their effects, and their causes are vital to understanding them and, where it is possible and…

Abstract

Race and ethnicity continue to divide us. Accurate data on those divisions, their effects, and their causes are vital to understanding them and, where it is possible and desired, healing them. The articles by Clyde Tucker and Brian Kojetin and by Ruth McKay and Manuel de la Puente describe the joint BLS‐Census efforts to develop questions on these issues for the Current Population Survey that will increase the accuracy of the counts and reduce negative emotional responses to the survey itself.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Tan Chwee‐Huat

Examines four recent employee relations issues in Singapore. These include dependency on foreign workers, an ageing workforce, impact of companies relocating their…

Abstract

Examines four recent employee relations issues in Singapore. These include dependency on foreign workers, an ageing workforce, impact of companies relocating their labour‐intensive industries to other countries, and problems related to privatization of government‐linked companies. The employment of foreign workers is constrained by an imposed levy and quota. Extending the retirement age provides jobs for older workers. However, employers perceive them as less productive and more expensive unless the wage system can be modified. Workers made redundant by company relocation are the less skilled. Proposes that the solution lies in retraining and upgrading the skills of workers.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Jean S.K. Lee and Jasmine C.L. Pow

With the tight labour market in Singapore, greater emphasis needs to be put on increasing the utilisation of the woman work force. Although the concerted efforts by the…

Abstract

With the tight labour market in Singapore, greater emphasis needs to be put on increasing the utilisation of the woman work force. Although the concerted efforts by the Government are necessary in increasing the female labour force participation rate, employers should develop their own equal opportunity guidelines and policies, which will provide women with a suitable job and ensure that they remain employed. This research aims to study the existing human resource policies on women in Singapore organisations. A survey was conducted on 100 Singapore‐based organisations to investigate their human resource policies on recruitment and selection, career development, training, compensation, flexible work arrangement and child care arrangements.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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