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Article

Lee D. Parker and Lai Hong Chung

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the construction of social and environmental strategies and the related implementation of management control by a key…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the construction of social and environmental strategies and the related implementation of management control by a key organisation located in a pivotal Asian location in the global hospitality industry. In doing so, it sets out to elucidate the forms and processes of strategic social and environmental control as well their relationship to the traditional financial control system.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs field-based case study of a single case operating in both regional and global context. Drawing upon documentary, survey and interview sources, the study employs structuration theory to inform its design and analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal the interaction of top-down global corporate framing and bottom-up local-level staff initiatives that combine to develop a locally focussed and differentiated social and environmental programme and expedite an associated management control and accountability system. The study also reveals the dominance of the traditional financial control system over the social and environmental management control system and the simultaneously enabling and constraining nature of that relationship.

Practical implications

Signification and legitimation structures can be employed in building social and environmental values and programmes which then lay the foundations for related discourse and action at multiple levels of the organisation. This also has the potential to facilitate modes of staff commitment expressed through bottom-up initiatives and control, subject to but also facilitated by the dominating influence of the organisation’s financial control system.

Social implications

This study reveals the importance of national and regional governmental, cultural and social context as both potential enablers and beneficiaries of organisational, social and environmental strategy and control innovation and implementation.

Originality/value

The paper offers an intra-organisational perspective on social and environmental strategising and control processes and motivations that elucidates forms of action, control and accountability and the relationship between social/environmental control and financial control agendas. It further reveals the interaction between globally developed strategic and control frameworks and locally initiated bottom-up strategic initiatives and control.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Michael Y.L. Chew, Sheila Conejos and Jessie Sze Long Law

Nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings can potentially address the current surge in façade cleaning cost, maintenance and labour problems. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Nanostructured titanium dioxide (TiO2) coatings can potentially address the current surge in façade cleaning cost, maintenance and labour problems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate potential maintainability issues and design challenges concerning the effective performance of TiO2 façade coatings’ hydrophilic properties, especially in tropical environments such as Singapore. This paper aims to establish a list of green maintainability design criteria to help minimise future TiO2 façade coating issues when this coating is applied on commercial buildings with concrete and stonemasonry façade materials.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-mode approach that includes a literature review, site investigation, instrumental case studies and expert interviews is used in this study.

Findings

TiO2 coatings help improve façade performance whilst offering environmental benefits to society. This study reports that green maintainability design criteria are vital requirements in designing sustainable buildings at the outset. The identified defects and issues will aid in ensuring the effectiveness of TiO2 application in building façades.

Originality/value

This study acts as a foundation for future researchers to strengthen this little researched area, serves as a useful guide in preventing possible TiO2 coating issues and promotes industry awareness of the use of TiO2 façade coatings.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article

Carolyn Koh, Mario Fernando and Trevor Spedding

The purpose of this paper is to explore the western developed notion of responsible leadership (RL) from a Singapore context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the western developed notion of responsible leadership (RL) from a Singapore context.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the qualitative research tradition, face-to-face interviews with 20 influential Singaporean leaders were developed into case studies. Grounded theory methodology was applied to identify similarities and differences within and across cases.

Findings

The findings reveal that the interviewed Singaporean leaders projected traits and values consistent with western definitions of responsible and effective leadership. Findings also suggest that contextual factors such as national culture and the ethos of the nation as well as leaders’ relational intelligence influence RL. These factors also help responsible leaders to better manage the tension between responsible and effective leadership.

Research limitations/implications

The small and geographically bound sample size makes it difficult to generalise the findings of this study. As in other ethics studies, interviewees’ desire to present a socially desirable image of themselves could be high in this study. Finally, the methods and analytical techniques applied may be biased and be influenced by the purposive selection of the participants.

Practical implications

Singaporean business leaders may need to consider the importance of retaining and developing the national culture and ethos of the nation, since these are the factors that have been identified in this study as key to influencing RL.

Originality/value

This study identifies the factors that influence RL from a Singapore context. It extends the understanding of the mostly western-based multi-level theory of RL.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article

Jasmine B.-Y. Sim and Malathy Krishnasamy

One would not commonly associate democracy with Singapore, instead scholars have often described Singapore as an illiberal democracy and an authoritarian state. At the…

Abstract

Purpose

One would not commonly associate democracy with Singapore, instead scholars have often described Singapore as an illiberal democracy and an authoritarian state. At the same time, all Singaporean school students recite the national pledge of allegiance in school every morning, in which they pledge “to build a democratic society based on justice and equality”. What do students know about democracy? Are they able to distinguish the characteristics of democratic systems from non-democratic ones? The purpose of this paper is to report on Singapore students’ understandings of democracy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative instrumental case study design, 64 students from three secondary schools were interviewed and the social studies curriculum was analysed.

Findings

Overall, students had poor knowledge of democracy. Consistent with a lack of knowledge of democracy, most students also showed a relatively uncritical acceptance of hierarchy and deference to authority, and held a superficial understanding of citizenship. Civics lessons through social studies, and the school environment did little to promote students’ engagement with democracy.

Research limitations/implications

The authors argue that it is important that students be given the opportunities to develop a basic conceptual knowledge of democracy, as they are not capable of discriminating democratic characteristics from non-democratic ones without it. At the very least, students should know the relevance of what they pledge relative to their nation’s model of democracy, or in the absence of a clear model, be encouraged to struggle with the various existing models of democracies so that, as the future of Singapore, they might determine and adapt the ideals that they deem best for the nation.

Originality/value

This paper is an original study of Singapore students’ understandings of democracy.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article

David Ng, Dong Thanh Nguyen, Benjamin Koon Siak Wong and William Kim Weng Choy

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of empirical studies on principal leadership in Singapore. It seeks to provide a general picture of Singapore principals…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a review of empirical studies on principal leadership in Singapore. It seeks to provide a general picture of Singapore principals’ leadership qualities, styles, and roles.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a systematic review of empirical studies, using a “bounded” approach with a focus on the main findings of the reviewed studies. In all, 36 studies were selected for the interview. The findings of these studies were open coded, synthesized, and clustered into different themes.

Findings

The review revealed several qualities, characteristics, styles, and enacted roles of Singapore principals. While there are similarities between Singapore principals and principals elsewhere in the world, the review brought out some features unique to Singapore principals.

Originality/value

This review contributes to the growing literature in comparative research on principals’ leadership and their enacted roles, and concurrently functions as a guide for further research on school leadership in Singapore.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Book part

Han Shen, Chengyi Song, Mimi Li and Qian Jiang

SNS, namely social networking sites, has become one of the most effective and fast channels of information diffusion and dissemination. As an influential way of online…

Abstract

SNS, namely social networking sites, has become one of the most effective and fast channels of information diffusion and dissemination. As an influential way of online marketing, SNS has been increasingly used by tourism organizations and enterprises to shape their destination image. On the basis of previews literature of destination image and SNS, this paper used the text analysis software ROST Content Mining (ROST CM) System to do a case study of the SNS destination marketing of Singapore on Chinese market. The authors analyze the text related to Singapore tourism on the major SNS in mainland China: Renren, Sina Weibo, and Douban, through word frequency analysis and the social semantic network, to summarize the destination image of Singapore on SNS. The paper also focuses on the difference of image building by official and individual SNS. Results found by this paper can be used by the relevant tourism organizations and enterprises to improve their destination marketing and image building on SNS channels.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-271-9

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Article

Sheila Conejos, Michael Yit Lin Chew and Fikril Hakim Bin Azril

Vertical greenery systems (VGS) have been a widely accepted design strategy that contributes to creating sustainable built environments. However, green building…

Abstract

Purpose

Vertical greenery systems (VGS) have been a widely accepted design strategy that contributes to creating sustainable built environments. However, green building technologies (e.g. VGS) have grown in complexity which poses maintainability challenges. Designing with maintainability in mind is crucial in delivering efficient and sustainable buildings. This paper aims to assist designers and allied professionals in terms of integrating maintainability and sustainable design in developing high-rise VGS directly from its design inception.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is grounded on the “Green Maintainability” concept which link maintainability, sustainability and facility management right at the outset. The Green Maintainability factors are translated into critical design criteria which are used to analyze the selected instrumental case studies to evaluate the high-rise VGS performance and maintainability potential. A qualitative approach via the triangulation of data collected from relevant literatures, field surveys and walkthrough interviews is undertaken.

Findings

Findings have shown that the major VGS defects which are mostly occurring in the case studies are issues concerning fallen leaves and dirt accumulation; safety issues during cleaning and repairs; insufficient maintenance access; algae/ mould growth; withering plants; water stagnation/ ponding; poor/faulty irrigation and water dripping and unavailability of natural elements. Best practices and lessons learned revealed few design oversight and technical issues concerning high-rise VGS façade implementation. While maintenance cost, biodiversity and lack of coordination among involved professionals are the additional issues which emerged during the stakeholders’ walkthrough interviews.

Originality/value

Current researches conducted on the maintainability of green building technologies (e.g. high-rise VGS) are still few. This research study is the first comprehensive assessment to determine the green maintainability potential and performance of high-rise VGS in tropical conditions.

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Article

Daniel Chan

Distils the key insights for management development from the four research papers, in this special issue taken individually as well as collectively. The perspective taken…

Abstract

Distils the key insights for management development from the four research papers, in this special issue taken individually as well as collectively. The perspective taken is one of strategy – for the industry practitioner or strategy/management consultant. The key insights that extend beyond the scope of individual research papers will be presented first, under the following themes: Lessons of brand/differentiation strategy; Managing a leading brand; A lesson from the case study; Strategy in a complex, turbulent and uncertain globalising environment. Key insights that are single research paper specific will be presented as follows: The story of Singapore Airlines and the Singapore Girl; Air wars in Asia: competitive and collaborative strategies and tactics in action; The Development of the airline industry from 1978 to 1998: a strategic global overview; Beyond Singapore Girl: grand and product/service differentiation strategies in the new millennium.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article

Low Sui Pheng and Christopher H.Y. Leong

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many…

Abstract

The Asian financial crisis snowballed in July 1997 following the devaluation of the Thai baht. This triggered off a chain reaction which led to similar crises in many countries in Asia, including Singapore. One of the arguments put forward to explain the financial crisis in Asia relates to the Asian style of management, which purportedly includes kinsmanship and guanxi or family connections. But is this really the case? Is the Asian management style significantly different from the Western style of management? It is shown that the style of management in Asian countries can also be explained and described using contemporary management theories from the West. This is achieved through a case study in construction project management for a typical family‐run building firm in Singapore. Field observations on the construction site suggest that the style of management in Asia can be related to modern management theories from the West.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article

Patrick Kim Cheng Low

To show and analyse the concept, practice, problems and prospects of father leadership in Singapore. The study also proposes such practices in Asian countries.

Abstract

Purpose

To show and analyse the concept, practice, problems and prospects of father leadership in Singapore. The study also proposes such practices in Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The focus group participants, were mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, and did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy.

Findings

The Singapore Government leads the way and father leadership is widely practiced. An analysis is also made of the management approach, problems and prospects of father leadership as practised in Singapore with its practices proposed in other Asian countries.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include time and costs constraints; otherwise more focus group sessions can be held and the focus group participants, mostly of experienced corporate and business leaders, did not represent a cross‐section of the population; they were made of business people because of the peculiarities of Singapore's history and economy. It is argued that a synonymous match exists between the national culture and business culture in Singapore; hence the selection of the business people in the focus group. That synonymous match is primarily because of the country's small size and lack of natural resources, and because since its birth as a modern nation, Singapore is dependent on human capital and relies strongly on its economy for its survival and growth.

Practical implications

The study provides useful lessons for businesses and political analysts outside Singapore to better understand the Government's paternalistic instincts in ensuring the long‐term sustainability of Singapore's economy and her citizenry.

Originality/value

The article provides a continuing perspective on governance and management in Singapore. It also extends existing studies into Confucianistic societies/ societies that are perceived by the outside world as being autocratic.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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