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Terence Ping Ching Fan

The rise of Emirates, Etihad, and Qatar Airways in the Middle East (collectively referred to as “ME3”) has been absolutely dramatic. How should other full-service carriers…

Abstract

The rise of Emirates, Etihad, and Qatar Airways in the Middle East (collectively referred to as “ME3”) has been absolutely dramatic. How should other full-service carriers respond? This study takes a look at how one carrier, Singapore Airlines, has responded and may offer clues to how others may choose to respond. Facing ME3’s ascent in service quality and rapid capacity expansion, Singapore Airlines stuck to its niche as a premium carrier and refrained from tit-for-tat type competition. It managed to command a fare premium in select markets even in the presence of ME3, but had to sacrifice growth in its passenger count. This offers valuable lessons for other full-service carriers.

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Article

Daniel Chan

Maps the strategic 50‐year journey of Singapore Airlines (SIA) to identify the underlying factors that account for its extraordinary success and world‐class stature. Both…

Abstract

Maps the strategic 50‐year journey of Singapore Airlines (SIA) to identify the underlying factors that account for its extraordinary success and world‐class stature. Both longitudinal and comparative research methodologies were employed. For the former, the approach taken was to systematically research SIA’s historical development over the entire 50‐year time period. SIA was studied from its very beginning and through all phases of its development to the present day. For the latter, SIA was compared with and benchmarked against other airlines. Its unique and successful product/service differentiation strategy, epitomised by the ephemeral Singapore Girl, has turned out to be enduring and difficult‐to‐match over the past 25 years and still shows no signs of letting up.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Daniel Chan

Distils the key insights for management development from the four research papers, in this special issue taken individually as well as collectively. The perspective taken…

Abstract

Distils the key insights for management development from the four research papers, in this special issue taken individually as well as collectively. The perspective taken is one of strategy – for the industry practitioner or strategy/management consultant. The key insights that extend beyond the scope of individual research papers will be presented first, under the following themes: Lessons of brand/differentiation strategy; Managing a leading brand; A lesson from the case study; Strategy in a complex, turbulent and uncertain globalising environment. Key insights that are single research paper specific will be presented as follows: The story of Singapore Airlines and the Singapore Girl; Air wars in Asia: competitive and collaborative strategies and tactics in action; The Development of the airline industry from 1978 to 1998: a strategic global overview; Beyond Singapore Girl: grand and product/service differentiation strategies in the new millennium.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Daniel Chan

It has been forecast that before the turn of the millennium air travel in Asia will account for 40 percent of global travel rising to 50 percent by 2010. The International…

Abstract

It has been forecast that before the turn of the millennium air travel in Asia will account for 40 percent of global travel rising to 50 percent by 2010. The International Air Transport Association also forecast world international scheduled passenger numbers to grow by an average of 7.1 percent annually to 2000, to reach 522 million. Air wars over Asia are hotting up, with some of the world’s biggest airlines engaged in intense competition over Asian skies – potentially the richest and most lucrative air travel market on Planet Earth, notwithstanding the 1997 currency turmoil. This article looks at how competition in the Asia Pacific air travel industry was played out in the 1990s. A glimpse of what is to come can be drawn from the several tough skirmishes seen thus far in the 1990s.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article

Daniel Chan

Takes a strategic journey into the future of the airline industry and air travel. The strategic trends and profound changes that are sweeping through the world airline

Abstract

Takes a strategic journey into the future of the airline industry and air travel. The strategic trends and profound changes that are sweeping through the world airline industry and air travel currently, as well as into the next millennium, are analysed. So too are the responses of the lead airlines that are leading the charge in shaping as well as responding to these changes, which will present new opportunities, threats and challenges to airlines with global aspirations operating on the world stage. Singapore Airlines was analysed with British Airways and United Airlines as the leading European and US comparison airlines, respectively, for comparative and benchmarking purposes.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Leo‐Paul Dana and Daniella Vignali

“There is no sound reason to believe that there will not be a single global market in air transport”. Those were the words of Sir Colin Marshall, the chairman of British…

Abstract

“There is no sound reason to believe that there will not be a single global market in air transport”. Those were the words of Sir Colin Marshall, the chairman of British Airways. To give the airline an image of being a global airline, the amount of £60 million had been earmarked. Simultaneously, British Airways Chief Executive Robert (Bob) Ayling wanted the firm to become the best‐managed company in Europe, by the year 2000. This case study assesses how British Airways have gone about achieving this goal.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 16 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article

Tan Chwee Huat

Public enterprises have contributed significantly to Singapore′seconomic success but in recent years they have been criticised forplaying a dominant role that overshadows…

Abstract

Public enterprises have contributed significantly to Singapore′s economic success but in recent years they have been criticised for playing a dominant role that overshadows the private sector. The Government has decided to embark on a ten‐year privatisation process. However, public enterprises will continue to participate in business where private entrepreneurs are reluctant to venture into.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article

Leo Paul Dana

This case is about Korean Air Lines’ innovative idea to adopt a policy of vertical integration in catering. Rather than out‐source its in‐flight catering, this airline has…

Abstract

This case is about Korean Air Lines’ innovative idea to adopt a policy of vertical integration in catering. Rather than out‐source its in‐flight catering, this airline has moved away from industry norms, and is doing its own thing – literally.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Singapore Airlines (SIA) is consistently recognized as the world’s “best” airline. It is regularly voted “best business class”, “best cabin crew service”, “best in‐flight…

Abstract

Singapore Airlines (SIA) is consistently recognized as the world’s “best” airline. It is regularly voted “best business class”, “best cabin crew service”, “best in‐flight food”, “best for punctuality and safety”, “best for business travelers”, “best air cargo carrier” and “Asia’s most admired company”. As well as being the “best”, SIA is also one of the most profitable airlines. The company’s senior management explain how their customer service advantage has been maintained, revealing that customer satisfaction need not necessarily be traded off for profitability.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article

Loizos Heracleous and Jochen Wirtz

To explore the potential role of biometric technologies in driving service excellence, productivity and security in the service sector, and their role in fostering…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the potential role of biometric technologies in driving service excellence, productivity and security in the service sector, and their role in fostering sustainable competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a case study approach involving 16 in‐depth interviews with executives at Singapore Airlines and the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore on their use of biometrics technologies with focus on the Fully Automated Seamless Travel project.

Findings

The potential for innovative technologies to foster sustainable competitive advantage can be assessed in terms of their potential impact on customer experience, as well as the extent to which their implementation involves significant business process reconfigurations that are hard to imitate by competitors.

Research limitations/implications

With regard to limitations, this research is based on an in‐depth study of a single case of biometrics implementation. More cases need to be examined to enhance the validity of the findings. Research implications relate to evaluation of new technologies from the perspective of achieving competitive advantage, outline of dimensions of strategic alignment, and discussion of competencies and processes fostering strategic innovation.

Practical implications

The findings provide a new framework for evaluating innovative technologies in terms of their potential for enabling an integrative strategy of differentiation and cost leadership; highlight the importance of strategic alignment; and outline competencies fostering strategic innovation.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first exploring the role of biometric technologies in service delivery; addresses the strategic implications of implementation; and concludes in terms of broader strategic principles.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000