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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2021

Fei Tong, Jie Yang, Meng Qiang Duan, Xu Fei Ma and Gao Chao Li

The purpose of this article is to understand the current research status and future development trends in the field of numerical simulation on rock mass grouting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to understand the current research status and future development trends in the field of numerical simulation on rock mass grouting.

Design/methodology/approach

This article first searched the literature database (EI, Web of Science, CNKI, etc.) for keywords related to the numerical simulation of rock mass grouting to obtain the initial literature database. Then, from the initial database, several documents with strong relevance to the numerical simulation theme of rock mass grouting and high citation rate were selected; some documents from the references were selected as supplements, forming the sample database of this review study (a total of 90 articles). Finally, through sorting out the relationship among the literature, this literature review was carried out.

Findings

The numerical simulation of rock mass grouting is mainly based on the porous media model and the fractured media model. It has experienced the development process from Newtonian fluid to non-Newtonian fluid, from time-invariant viscosity to time-varying viscosity, and from generalized theoretical model to engineering application model. Based on this, this article summarizes four scientific problems that need to be solved in the future in this research field: the law of grout distribution at the cross fissures, the grout diffusion mechanism under multi-field coupling, more accurate grouting theoretical model and simulation technology with strong engineering applicability.

Originality/value

This research systematically analyzes the current research status and shortcomings of numerical simulation on rock mass grouting, summarizes four key issues in the future development of this research field and provides new ideas for the future research on numerical simulation on rock mass grouting.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2010

Sung J. Shim and Arun Kumar

Using computer simulation, this paper seeks to model the emergency care process in a hospital and evaluate the effects of some proposed changes to improve patient wait…

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1793

Abstract

Purpose

Using computer simulation, this paper seeks to model the emergency care process in a hospital and evaluate the effects of some proposed changes to improve patient wait times in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based upon a case study conducted at the hospital and uses historical data provided by the hospital to simulate the emergency care process.

Findings

The simulation results demonstrate that the changes proposed can shorten patient wait times in the emergency care process. The proposed changes involve adding another payment station and a new short‐stay ward in the process. Based upon the results, the paper supports the implementation of the changes proposed.

Research limitations/implications

A couple of limitations are recognized in this paper. First, the simulation does not consider varying the capacity of resources and locations involved in the emergency care process. Second, the simulation does not consider patients by clinical disciplines in which they are treated.

Practical implications

The simulation results show that computer simulation can be an effective decision support tool in modelling the emergency care process and evaluating the effects of changes in the process. The results would be helpful to those who are considering reengineering and improving emergency care or other similar processes in hospitals.

Originality/value

Based upon a case study using real‐world data, this paper extends the line of studies on computer simulation in healthcare by considering not only patient wait times in the emergency care process but also some ways to improve patient wait times and their effects on the process.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

A.J. Faria and John R. Dickinson

Compared with other methods of instruction, whether in managementtraining programmes or in university courses, simulation gaming isrelatively new. Readings, lectures…

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3259

Abstract

Compared with other methods of instruction, whether in management training programmes or in university courses, simulation gaming is relatively new. Readings, lectures, cases, role playing and other instructional techniques were in use long before the appearance of business games. Though recent in comparative terms, however, simulation games have been in existence for nearly 40 years. Examines the use of simulation games for sales management training, describes a newly developed sales management simulation and illustrates its use in a sales‐training programme.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

John B. Washbush and Jerry Gosen

Total enterprise simulations are often used and included as graded elements by instructors in business degree capstone “policy courses” under the assumption that their use…

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744

Abstract

Total enterprise simulations are often used and included as graded elements by instructors in business degree capstone “policy courses” under the assumption that their use enriches the learning experience. This suggests a belief that people who perform best in simulations have learned how to play the game better. The studies reported on here attempt to determine and evaluate the relationship between learning and simulation performance. These studies have consistently found that, while simulation‐related learning does occur, there appears to be no direct, positive relationship between the two variables. Suggestions for further research are proposed.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 10 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

L.P. Baldwin, T. Eldabi, V. Hlupic and Z. Irani

The design of manufacturing systems is a complex and expensive task for both SMEs and large organisations alike. Many problems relating to the design and operation of…

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1095

Abstract

The design of manufacturing systems is a complex and expensive task for both SMEs and large organisations alike. Many problems relating to the design and operation of manufacturing systems are too complex to allow for mathematical treatment, and as a result there is increasing recognition of the applicability of simulation in the manufacturing environment. This has in turn resulted in a growth in simulation software products available in the marketplace, and manufacturers of such products are naturally keen to extol the virtues of what they sell. In a rapidly changing workplace, there is some suggestion that simulation tools may not have developed to deal with the new demands, and so it is timely to review what is on offer. This paper presents the results of a survey of European simulation specialists, both working in industry and in an academic environment, on the use of simulation software. The main purpose of this survey was to determine how satisfied users are with simulation software and to highlight the most positive and negative features. The findings offer an insight into current software, and how this can be further enhanced.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Chaipong Pongpanich, Tanasak Krabuanrat and Kim Hua Tan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and gain insights into the use of computer simulations and games in business schools in Thailand. In addition, it aims to

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate and gain insights into the use of computer simulations and games in business schools in Thailand. In addition, it aims to compare the findings in Thailand with the study carried out in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 700 questionnaires were sent to the 35 universities in Thailand that offer MBA degrees. This survey achieved a response rate of 23 percent.

Findings

The usage of simulation games in business schools in Thailand is still at an early stage of development. The primary reason to use such tools in both Thailand and the UK is that they help to increase students' interaction and teamwork. Meanwhile, lack of information on simulation games is major obstacle of using simulation games in their classroom teaching. However, the demand for computer simulations and games in the classroom is likely to increase in the future.

Research limitation/implications

The study provides good platform for further in‐depth study on this topic in Thailand. As for practical implication, it suggests a need for more collaboration between industry and academia so that simulation games will be developed to fit with the teaching courses.

Originality/value

This study highlights the key factors underpinning the usage of these new tools in classroom teaching in the Thai context.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Rodger Mitchell

Business simulations come in two forms: custom simulations that mirror a specific business, or evolved simulations presenting a generic business model. This paper aims to

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834

Abstract

Purpose

Business simulations come in two forms: custom simulations that mirror a specific business, or evolved simulations presenting a generic business model. This paper aims to investigate these.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint paper presents the relative merits of both types of simulation.

Findings

The paper finds that custom simulations are ideal for training in specific products or processes. For all broad business learning objectives such as improved financial and strategic skills, an evolved simulation is a better choice. Capstone Business Simulation, for example, is used in executive education – for students from a wide range of industries – at Kellogg Business School, one of the top rated US business schools, and by corporations in a wide range of industries.

Originality/value

The paper can be used to help decide what type of business simulation is best for corporate training objectives.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

T.A. Spedding, W.L. Lee, R. de Souza and S.S.G. Lee

Describes the development of an adaptive simulation model for a keyboard assembly cell for real‐time decision support. Discusses the architecture of the modelling and…

Abstract

Describes the development of an adaptive simulation model for a keyboard assembly cell for real‐time decision support. Discusses the architecture of the modelling and control system, including the movement of entities and conveyors, describing how up to four different keyboard types may be modelled, with a PC cell controller continually monitoring the state changes of the assembly line, passing the data captured to the simulation model created in ARENA.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Felix T.S. Chan and Bing Jiang

Manufacturing systems design is a complex task and is crucial to the future of a company. Computer simulation provides an efficient and visual method for system designers…

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1080

Abstract

Manufacturing systems design is a complex task and is crucial to the future of a company. Computer simulation provides an efficient and visual method for system designers. The popularity of simulation is owing to its ability to model systems in a fast and cost‐effective way, its flexibility and its ability to model the time dynamic behavior of systems. This paper demonstrates the use of computer simulation as a tool for assisting managers and engineers in the design and analysis of a new manufacturing system by presenting a case study. The case study is a study of proposed instrument panel/crashpad production and assembly work‐cells in an automotive industry. The emphasis on the case study was to evaluate alternative designs, predict system performance, detect any potential problems, experiment with system parameters and determine the sensitivity of the system to these parameters. The case study results show that computer simulation can be a useful decision‐making support tool for the analysis of the system performance and the selection of the design alternatives before the system is actually implemented.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Stephen A. Stumpf and Jane E. Dutton

Management simulations are used in many adult education programmes.Yet, little has been written about how people learn throughparticipation in such simulations. After a…

Abstract

Management simulations are used in many adult education programmes. Yet, little has been written about how people learn through participation in such simulations. After a description of how management simulations work, we propose four ideas to support the increasingly held belief that it is worthwhile to use management simulations in business education. Because management simulations are able to provide relevant, individualised, and experience‐based learnings for both programme participants and the facilitators, their use in management education is likely to increase several fold by the year 2000.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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