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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Tor Söderström, Carina Lindgren and Gregory Neely

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the practical knowing that is central in police education. Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the practical knowing that is central in police education. Drawing on perspectives about tacit knowledge and embodied learning (e.g. Merleau-Ponty, 1945/1997; Polanyi, 1966; Argyris and Schön, 1974) as well as empirical examples, this paper discusses the design of and what can be expected from computer simulation training for the development of police students’ professional knowing.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion is based on lessons learned from working with two different computer simulation training situations designed to prepare the students for an upcoming practical training by facilitating the understanding of complex situations as they should be handled in the physical training situation.

Findings

The experiences from the training sessions showed that the different characteristics of the simulations mediate how the training session was performed, e.g., unplanned trial and error vs focused and attentive, but also group discussions about how to act and appropriate actions in relation to the situation to be solved in the simulation.

Originality/value

Based on the lessons learned from working with the two different computer simulations, it is posited that the use of computer simulations for practical scenario training is a complex endeavor that needs, in various degrees, to be supported by pedagogical steering. The design of computer simulation training (both the simulation and how the training is designed and performed) need to consider the specific aspects that surround tacit knowledge and embodied learning in the “real sense” (anchored to the practical training) to be of relevance for police students development of professional knowing.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Jared Freeman and Wayne Zachary

Technology for training military teams has evolved through a convergence of advances in simulation technology for individual and collective training, methods for analyzing…

Abstract

Technology for training military teams has evolved through a convergence of advances in simulation technology for individual and collective training, methods for analyzing teamwork and designing training solutions, and intelligent tutoring technologies that adapt training to the student, to accelerate learning. A number of factors have slowed this evolution toward intelligent team tutoring systems (ITTS), including the challenges of processing communications data, which are the currency of teamwork, and the paucity of automated and generalizable measures of team work. Several systems fulfill a subset of the features required of an ITTS, namely the use of team training objectives, teamwork models, measures of teamwork, diagnostic capability, instructional strategies, and adaptation of training to team needs. We describe these systems: the Advanced Embedded Training System (AETS), Synthetic Cognition for Operational Team Training (SCOTT), the AWO Trainer, the Benchmarked Experiential System for Training (BEST), and the Cross-Platform Mission Visualization Tool. We close this chapter with recommendations for future research.

Details

Building Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-474-1

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Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

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The Science and Simulation of Human Performance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-296-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

A.J. Faria and John R. Dickinson

Compared with other methods of instruction, whether in managementtraining programmes or in university courses, simulation gaming isrelatively new. Readings, lectures…

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Abstract

Compared with other methods of instruction, whether in management training programmes or in university courses, simulation gaming is relatively new. Readings, lectures, cases, role playing and other instructional techniques were in use long before the appearance of business games. Though recent in comparative terms, however, simulation games have been in existence for nearly 40 years. Examines the use of simulation games for sales management training, describes a newly developed sales management simulation and illustrates its use in a sales‐training programme.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Kevin Real, Leanna Hartsough and Lisa C. Huddleston

This chapter examines group communication in medical teams through psychological safety and simulation training research. Research has shown that medical teams are…

Abstract

This chapter examines group communication in medical teams through psychological safety and simulation training research. Research has shown that medical teams are challenged by established hierarchies, power/status differences, temporal stability, changing team memberships, and deeply held beliefs that emphasize individual responsibility. A review of 47 studies (29 psychological safety, 18 simulation) was conducted to understand key findings in relationship to group communication. Results indicate that team leadership promotes team psychological safety, voice, and relationship quality while status differences and hierarchy continue to affect psychological safety within medical teams. Simulation training facilitated interprofessional relationships, attitudes toward teamwork, self-efficacy, and group communication. The findings of this review suggest that psychological safety may be developed through simulation training. The quality of patient care is improved when all members of medical teams have the ability and motivation to communicate effectively.

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The Emerald Handbook of Group and Team Communication Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-501-8

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

René Börner, Jürgen Moormann and Minhong Wang

The paper aims to explore staff's experience with role‐plays using the example of training bank employees in Six Sigma as a major methodology for business process improvement.

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3959

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore staff's experience with role‐plays using the example of training bank employees in Six Sigma as a major methodology for business process improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a case study. A role‐play, KreditSim, is used to simulate a loan approval process that has to be improved by the participants. KreditSim has been conducted many times with various groups in both academic and professional environments. The authors used five role‐play sessions to conduct a survey among the participants and questioned seven facilitators experienced in KreditSim to generate empirical evidence for the effectiveness of such role‐plays.

Findings

Role‐play based simulations complement training programs in terms of active participation and first‐hand experience. Not only methodological learning is achieved but social and communicative as well as affective learning are supported, too. The employed role‐play highlights the relevance and applicability of the Six Sigma methodology to staff's day‐to‐day responsibilities. Besides boosting awareness for process thinking, the role‐play also helps to engage staff members in process improvement efforts.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation to the results might be the small number of facilitators that supervised the role‐play sessions so far. Thus, results may not be representative in a statistical sense. Moreover, the design of KreditSim could be modified in different ways for future seminars. Using software to automate certain activities is one possible modification. Ongoing research investigates in how far such modifications influence the effectiveness and the participant's perception of the role‐play.

Practical implications

The present study reveals that role‐plays can be effectively used for staff training. The results show that staff are strongly receptive to role‐plays in the context of business process improvement. Furthermore, several objectives such as methodological or social learning can be pursued and combined by this type of training instrument.

Originality/value

This article contributes to existing research in analyzing the effectiveness of role‐plays in a workplace setting. The paper is based on a number of professional role‐play sessions within the financial services sector. The survey comprises multiple dimensions of learning and supports that staff appreciate the usage of role‐play based simulation in a workplace environment.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2020

Hannah Iannelli, Camilla Tooley, Grégoire Billon, Sean Cross, James Pathan and Chris Attoe

Individuals health with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience comorbid physical and mental health needs and have poorer outcomes resulting in early mortality…

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals health with intellectual disabilities (ID) experience comorbid physical and mental health needs and have poorer outcomes resulting in early mortality. Currently, many training provisions based on ID exist; however, limited research supports their effectiveness. High-fidelity simulation is an innovative training mechanism with promising preliminary results. This study aims to evaluate the longitudinal impact of simulation training on clinical practice in ID.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach was used in this study. A one-day simulation course using actors who had ID was delivered to 39 health-care professionals from across London hospitals. Nine semi-structured interviews were conducted 12–18 months post training.

Findings

High-fidelity simulation training is an effective training modality, which has a sustainable impact on participants, their clinical practice and patients. Core features of the training including debriefing, the use and type of actors, scenario design and the facilitators are crucial learning mechanisms which impacts learning outcomes and changes to behaviour in clinical practice and settings.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to longitudinally evaluate high-fidelity simulation training designed to improve the physical and mental health needs of those with ID. The research begins to bridge an important gap in the current literature, with a need for more research.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Nik Nadian Nisa Nik Nazli and Sheikh Muhamad Hizam Sheikh Khairudin

This paper aims to identify the relationship between organizational learning culture, psychological contract breach, work engagement, training simulation and transfer of…

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1768

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the relationship between organizational learning culture, psychological contract breach, work engagement, training simulation and transfer of training, to examine the effect of transfer of training on organizational citizenship behaviour and to determine the mediating effect of transfer of training on the relationship between organizational learning culture, psychological contract breach, work engagement and training simulation with organizational citizenship behaviour. This study investigated these relationships in the context of public sector organizations in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected by using the purposive sampling from Malaysian Civil Defence Force or Angkatan Pertahanan Awam (APM) employees who attended a disaster preparedness training programme between March to May 2015. The questionnaire was the main tool for the data gathering. The data were analysed using structural equation modelling technique using AMOS 22 version software.

Findings

The findings showed that work engagement and training simulation are the factors that influence the transfer of training, and there is a positive effect of the transfer of training on the organizational citizenship behaviour. The result also demonstrated that the transfer of training is the mediator in the relationship between work engagement, training simulation and organizational citizenship behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This study focuses on public sector areas which is Malaysia Civil Defense Force (APM). No interview session was conducted due to the time constraint in completing this study.

Originality/value

This study extends the existing understanding of factors that influence transfer of training and the effect of transfer of training on employees and organization. In other words, through the positive transfer of training, organizations not only attain positive returns on their training investment but also improve the performance and the work attitude of the organization’s employees.

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Orly Shapira-Lishchinsky

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new theory promoting long-term learning among mid-level leaders in schools via simulation training.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new theory promoting long-term learning among mid-level leaders in schools via simulation training.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed model is derived from the socioecological model, a model that takes into account the multifaceted effects of different disciplines. The proposed interdisciplinary model may be assimilated by considering the ethical-social context of mid-level leaders undergoing simulation training.

Findings

A new interdisciplinary model emerges from the original socioecological model. The model's interdisciplinary approach, crossing disciplines such as leadership, management and learning, enables this model to serve as a platform for research that enhances long-term learning among mid-level leaders in schools.

Practical implications

The elicited model, which can be assimilated via simulation training, may enhance long-term learning among mid-level leaders in schools and help to shape educational policy, improve learning and impact the exchange of knowledge between countries.

Originality/value

The emergent interdisciplinary model is expected to foster thinking beyond the traditional boundaries of each discipline and to enhance long-term learning in an ethical context among mid-level school leaders. The model's interdisciplinary approach, which creates new emergent dimensions suited to the challenges of the 21st century, makes this model a unique platform for research and simulation training that enhances long-term learning.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Virpi Slotte and Anne Herbert

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate learners' attitudes to the use of simulation‐based e‐learning as part of workplace learning when socially situated interaction and…

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2372

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate learners' attitudes to the use of simulation‐based e‐learning as part of workplace learning when socially situated interaction and blended learning are specifically included in the instructional design.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses to a survey questionnaire of 298 sales personnel were collected and analysed. Additionally, quantitative and qualitative data from 37 sales directors were obtained to further address the research question.

Findings

It was found that a majority of the participants conveyed improvement in their overall level of customer service skills applied in their own work tasks. In addition to the on‐line simulation being an engaging and fun way of learning, the socially situated interaction and blended delivery of the training program encouraged and facilitated discussion and fruitful debates about customer service in the workplace.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited by its potentially non‐representative sample, representing those who voluntarily participated to improve their sales and customer service skills in one chain bookstore.

Practical implications

A high rate of positive participant responses is attributable to the proper opportunity to supplement learning with practice, achieved through the design features of the program. The work has relevance for other corporate training providers considering incorporating live facilitation into on‐line simulation solutions.

Originality/value

Previously, not much attention has been paid to the use of a coach physically present working with learners using on‐line simulation‐based training, nor to differential benefits such arrangements may provide. Nor were many practical examples of socially situated e‐learning found in the literature. Feedback from both sales personnel and their directors provided a unique opportunity to analyse a work‐based training program using such arrangements.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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