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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2022

JiaChun Chen, Liangziye Tang, Honghong Tian, Ruiqiu Ou, Jingan Wang and Quan Chen

During the current global epidemic, e-learning and mobile learning have been rapidly developed in the field of entrepreneurship education. The effect of these learning…

Abstract

Purpose

During the current global epidemic, e-learning and mobile learning have been rapidly developed in the field of entrepreneurship education. The effect of these learning methods remains to be confirmed. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of mobile business simulation games in entrepreneurship education.

Design/methodology/approach

From May 2020 to July 2020, the authors adopted a quasi-experimental design to explore the effect of mobile business simulation games in entrepreneurship education. The authors set up an experimental group to participate in mobile business simulation games, with a total of 105 students, and set up a control group of 100 students. At the beginning and end of the experiment, data on entrepreneurial attitude, self-efficacy, entrepreneurial intention and other related variables were collected. Paired sample T-test and regression analysis were used to analyze the results.

Findings

The authors found that mobile business simulation games can improve entrepreneurial attitudes and self-efficacy, but cannot change entrepreneurial intentions. The paired sample T-test in the experimental group showed that the entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial self-efficacy of the participants were significantly improved, but the entrepreneurial intention did not change significantly. The above three variables did not change significantly in the control group. The research results also show that flow experience is very important in mobile business simulation games, which can improve entrepreneurial attitude and entrepreneurial self-efficacy.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings confirm the positive effects of mobile business simulation games in entrepreneurship education, which can improve entrepreneurial attitudes and entrepreneurial self-efficacy. But the disadvantage of mobile business simulation games is that they cannot increase entrepreneurial intention. In addition, the flow experience needs to be valued in mobile business simulation games. The research in this paper has implications for how mobile learning can be used in entrepreneurship education during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, research is of great value on how mobile business simulation games can be improved.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

A.J. Faria and John R. Dickinson

Compared with other methods of instruction, whether in managementtraining programmes or in university courses, simulation gaming isrelatively new. Readings, lectures…

3325

Abstract

Compared with other methods of instruction, whether in management training programmes or in university courses, simulation gaming is relatively new. Readings, lectures, cases, role playing and other instructional techniques were in use long before the appearance of business games. Though recent in comparative terms, however, simulation games have been in existence for nearly 40 years. Examines the use of simulation games for sales management training, describes a newly developed sales management simulation and illustrates its use in a sales‐training programme.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Lynn Vos and Ross Brennan

The paper aims to contribute to the wider adoption of simulation games in marketing teaching. The purposes of the research reported here are to understand marketing…

3253

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to contribute to the wider adoption of simulation games in marketing teaching. The purposes of the research reported here are to understand marketing students' perceptions of the learning achieved from the use of simulation games, and marketing lecturers' perceptions of the barriers to increased use of simulation games.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was administered to 137 final‐year marketing undergraduates studying at two British universities and eight semi‐structured interviews were conducted with marketing lecturers currently using simulation games in their marketing teaching.

Findings

Students perceive the simulation game to be a highly effective learning method, delivering valuable knowledge and skills. In addition, students find the game to be an enjoyable learning approach. Lecturers are enthusiastic about this learning method, but note some barriers to adoption; particularly cost, the steep learning curve, and the difficulty of finding unbiased advice about suitable games to deliver desired learning outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations are that the empirical base for the quantitative study was only two universities in the UK, and the questionnaire concerned only student perceptions of their learning, not an objective assessment of actual learning. It is recommended that the study be extended to a wider sample of universities, and that the approach be widened to include an assessment of the measurable learning outcomes achieved rather than just student perceptions.

Originality/value

The degree of student enthusiasm for simulation games is striking. Lecturers also find the method very engaging, but acknowledge that there are important barriers to more widespread simulation game adoption.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 April 2014

Mathews Nkhoma, Jaime Calbeto, Narumon Sriratanaviriyakul, Thu Muang, Quyen Ha Tran and Thanh Kim Cao

Simulation games have long been used as a teaching tool in the classroom environment mainly due to the high level of participation and engagement that students are able to…

Abstract

Purpose

Simulation games have long been used as a teaching tool in the classroom environment mainly due to the high level of participation and engagement that students are able to generate from these, making the learning process more enjoyable and capable to replicate real-life scenarios. Feedback given during the simulation helps to motivate students to find better solutions to the problems being presented in the games and thus enhance their hands-on knowledge on particular subjects. The purpose of this research is to provide empirical evidence of interrelations and impacts that exist between real-time continuous feedback and simulation game performance as well as the interrelations and impacts that exist between real-time continuous feedback and both students' attitude and engagement towards learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The research focused on 60 undergraduate students enrolled at the Centre of Commerce at RMIT University Vietnam who had taken at least three semesters at various programmes. For test purposes, the research employed a 3D IBM business process management (BPM) simulation game, INNOV8 developed by the IBM Academic Initiative (more information about the game is available at: www-01.ibm.com/software/solutions/soa/innov8/index.html). A web-based survey followed at the university grounds for the collection of data.

Findings

Students showed a favourable attitude towards learning through the simulation game. In addition, the real-time continuous feedback given during the simulation game had a positive impact on the students' cognitive learning outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size used was relatively small with 60 participants, most unfamiliar with the theories of BPM.

Originality/value

The originality of this research stems from the real-time and continuous nature of the feedback being given to students during the gameplay of a computer-based simulation game, and how this type of feedback could positively impact the students' learning outcomes.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Bill Kapralos, Michelle Hogan, Antonin I. Pribetic and Adam Dubrowski

Gaming and interactive virtual simulation environments support a learner‐centered educational model allowing learners to work through problems acquiring knowledge through…

Abstract

Purpose

Gaming and interactive virtual simulation environments support a learner‐centered educational model allowing learners to work through problems acquiring knowledge through an active, experiential learning approach. To develop effective virtual simulations and serious games, the views and perceptions of learners and educators must be assessed and taken into account, regarding their use in the classroom. This paper aims to present the results of two surveys conducted to assess faculty and student perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

Both surveys were conducted at University of Ontario Institute of Technology. The surveys were made available to students and faculty members via a link on an institute‐wide internal course management system.

Findings

Results indicate that students and educators appreciate the use of virtual simulations and serious games, but care must be taken to ensure that they are relevant to the course material and that educators are familiar with their use to assist students, should problems arise.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind conducted at a laptop‐based university and the results are important when considering the development of virtual simulations and serious games for teaching and learning.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Cory Wright-Maley

The U.S. has a deficit problem. Both political parties agree that the debt and the deficit must be addressed, but are at odds about how to do so. Worse still, there are…

Abstract

The U.S. has a deficit problem. Both political parties agree that the debt and the deficit must be addressed, but are at odds about how to do so. Worse still, there are members of both parties who make finding solutions difficult because of entrenched ideology. As we approach the second year of Congressional impasse, it appears that this crisis is far from over. It is little wonder that teaching students about this issue is difficult. There are myriad nuances and complexities that are challenging to get across to students through traditional means. Simulations are one way to introduce students to complex phenomena by allowing them to experience them. Simulations have proven to be effective teaching tools for addressing subjective experiences and fostering inquiry. Shifts in student dispositions also may occur with simulations. This paper walks the reader through an adaptation of the board game Monopoly to demonstrate how this simulation game can be used to teach students about the deficit crisis and debate from multiple perspectives across the socioeconomic spectrum.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Peggy A. Golden and Jerald R. Smith

Simulation games, like other experiential exercises, are methods ofdeveloping management skills that involve higher levels of learning.This article presents three cases of…

Abstract

Simulation games, like other experiential exercises, are methods of developing management skills that involve higher levels of learning. This article presents three cases of how these games provide a viable management development experience.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

A.J. Faria

The growth and usage of business games in management trainingprogrammes and university business courses are examined. It is concludedthat usage is quite high in both, and…

Abstract

The growth and usage of business games in management training programmes and university business courses are examined. It is concluded that usage is quite high in both, and those unfamiliar with this instructional method are encouraged to find out what simulation gaming is about.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 November 2022

Tobias Endress, Anton Pussep and Markus Schief

This study aims to investigate an integrated approach that stimulates engagement and interaction in the online learning environment. A simulation game was developed to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate an integrated approach that stimulates engagement and interaction in the online learning environment. A simulation game was developed to support the specific learning objectives (LOs) of the lecture and give students the opportunity to apply relevant practical skills (management and group decision-making). The simulation is designed to engage students, facilitate group work in teams and actively apply the knowledge from the lectures.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research methods and a pilot version of the simulation game in an actual classroom setting were used. The primary LO was to apply decision-making in groups and experience the consequences of decisions on business success. The students were assigned randomly to five groups representing different competing companies.

Findings

This study revealed that a simulation game with a reduced scope can facilitate interaction and participation in online lectures. It demonstrated that it is possible to obtain the main benefits of simulation-based learning with a simple game that consists of few decision variables and requires minimal training.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations to this pilot study, some of which need to be address in future research. One limitation is the small number of participants (21). Another limitation is that all participants were from a class at an Asian university. While adding to existing research that focused primarily on Anglo-America and Europe, this study’s approach should be evaluated with more subjects from varying cultural backgrounds to validate the findings. The evaluation could be improved with more participants but also additional questions to measure how and why this study’s approach benefits learning success. E.g. it should be explored what component of decision-making or group learning was most significant. With this, it would also be interesting to explore incremental learning and learning across groups along the study duration.

Practical implications

The simulation game can be used in business education. Students enjoyed the interaction with their peers and the instructor. The students stated that it was a good learning experience for them and they made good learning progress.

Originality/value

The prototype demonstrated the general feasibility and the smooth handling of the practical application and integration in online lectures. The aim to develop a serious simulation game for online classes was achieved. It was possible to obtain the main benefits of simulation-based learning with a simple game that consists of few decision variables and therefore requires minimal training and time.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Suresh L. Gamlath

The study emanated from initial attempts to determine whether two computer simulations used in teaching a college business course delivered a meaningful learning

515

Abstract

Purpose

The study emanated from initial attempts to determine whether two computer simulations used in teaching a college business course delivered a meaningful learning experience. This paper aims to investigate whether students' level of performance in the simulation game was due to the application of skill or largely a matter of “luck”.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a method similar to that of Wellington et al., the study evaluated the consistency of performance across two different rounds of each simulation game. It also compared performance levels across both simulations, and examined the relationship between game performance and academic achievement.

Findings

The significant consistency between performance levels suggests that with respect to the simulations used in this study, the game score reflected the player's application of skill rather than reliance on “luck”. However, there is no significant relationship between game performance and academic achievement.

Originality/value

While this study is based on two specific games, other simulation users can use it as a yardstick to ascertain the educational value of the simulations that they use.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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