Search results

1 – 7 of 7
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Simona Stan, Kenneth R. Evans, Charles M. Wood and Jeffrey L. Stinson

The purpose of this article is to explore the possible negative asymmetric effects in the impact of service quality on the satisfaction and retention of different customer…

2482

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the possible negative asymmetric effects in the impact of service quality on the satisfaction and retention of different customer segments in a professional business services context. Negative asymmetry means that a lower than average service quality evaluation has a stronger effect on customer satisfaction and retention than a higher than average evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

The article provides a survey of 124 business customers of a Midwestern radio advertising services provider, preceded by nine in‐depth interviews with account reps of the advertising firm and two focus groups with business customers.

Findings

Along the service quality dimensions – customer satisfaction – retention chain, there are significant negative asymmetric effects and the mediating role of satisfaction varies widely. There are important differences across customer groups: service outcomes are most important determinants of customer satisfaction for large and relatively newer accounts; functional quality dimensions (empathy) are most important factors for small and relatively mature accounts.

Research limitations/implications

Surveying customers of one organization in one industry reduces the generalizability of the findings. The study employed only two segmentation variables, while many other variables could be investigated. The focus is on the asymmetric effects of service quality; other factors, such as costs, were not considered.

Practical implications

Managers should invest resources in improving low performance in the service quality dimensions with strongest impact on customer satisfaction and highest negative asymmetry. The identified segment differences suggest the need to achieve strong results for large accounts and relatively new accounts. The customer relationship is most important for small accounts and relatively mature accounts. Maintaining service reliability is critical for small and new account retention.

Originality/value

This study is a first effort to explore the differences in effects across service quality dimensions and customer segments in a professional business service context. The findings indicate that aggregating customers and the service quality measurement can offer misleading information to managers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Shaoming Zou and Simona Stan

Export performance research has proliferated in the last decade. Significant progress has been made in developing better theory and knowledge of the export performance of…

9153

Abstract

Export performance research has proliferated in the last decade. Significant progress has been made in developing better theory and knowledge of the export performance of firms. However, the field of inquiry is characterized by a diversity of conceptual, methodological, and empirical approaches that inhibit the development of clear conclusions regarding the determinants of export performance. In this article, an updated review and synthesis of the empirical literature on determinants of export performance between 1987 and 1997 is offered. Using a combination of the narrative and vote‐counting approaches, 50 studies were identified, reviewed, and synthesized. Major directions for future research are also discussed.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Kenneth R. Evans, Simona Stan and Lynn Murray

Increasingly companies ask customers to participate in creating and producing services. This research aims to explore the effect that communicating role expectations to…

2566

Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly companies ask customers to participate in creating and producing services. This research aims to explore the effect that communicating role expectations to customers may have on their processing and evaluation of the encounter.

Design/methodology/approach

A dyadic experiment using prototypical customer‐couples and practicing insurance agents was implemented. Couples and agents were randomly assigned to dyads, which were then assigned to one of two conditions – a no‐expectations or an expectations condition. Post‐encounter, couples evaluated service quality and indicated their satisfaction, trust and anticipation of future interaction.

Findings

The study found that socialized customers relied more on service quality in evaluating the encounter than did unsocialized customers. However, socialized wives showed decreased trust, satisfaction and anticipation of future interaction than did non‐socialized wives (no significant differences for husbands).

Research limitations/implications

Expectations were simply provided to customers; and these expectations were framed to emphasize the benefits of complying with expectations may mitigate some negative effects of socialization.

Practical implications

While socialized customer outcomes declined, these customers relied more on the service quality elements of the encounter rather than peripheral elements beyond the control of the firm and the service provider. These findings highlight the caution managers must exercise as they juggle the trade‐offs inherent in communicating the customer's expanded role in the service production.

Originality/value

The customer's role in creating and producing service experiences has received increased attention. This research offers evidence that the benefits achieved through increased customer participation have costs to be considered.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

Katherine Tyler, Mark Patton, Marco Mongiello and Derek Meyer

The purpose of this article is to review the emerging literature of services business markets (SBMs) from 1974 to 2007 and analyse main themes that indicate the…

3027

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to review the emerging literature of services business markets (SBMs) from 1974 to 2007 and analyse main themes that indicate the development of the literature. It also aims to provide an introduction to the special issue on services business‐to‐business markets by examining the context.

Design/methodology/approach

The literature of SBMs from 1974 through 2007 was searched in relevant databases. The articles were analysed using Glaser's grounded theory. The constant comparison method was used with in vivo coding to reveal themes in the literature. These themes were then analysed contextually.

Findings

The literature revealed seven themes which followed a trajectory from implicit to explicit consideration of SBMs, as well as to multi‐ and cross‐disciplinary focus with integration of variables from consumer services marketing. The landscape for SBMs has become blurred due to deregulation, globalisation and information technology, particularly the internet and e‐commerce. The complexity and diversity of the literature reflects this new, blurred reality.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to indicative literature about SBMs as an introduction to the special issue on services business‐to‐business markets. The literature would benefit from a full critical review and research agenda.

Practical implications

The integration of theories coupled with the focus on specific service sectors and contexts, provide useful, applicable and transferable concepts which may be helpful to managers who are working in new contexts.

Originality/value

This article surveys the emergence of the literature on SBMs and defines its trajectory, themes and characteristics. It provides a useful background for academics and practitioners who would find a guide to the fissiparous literature on SBMs useful.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2007

324

Abstract

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Brian Jones and Stanley Shapiro

863

Abstract

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Article
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Asiye Ayben Celik and Enis Yakut

The purpose of this paper, focusing on the visually impaired and legally blind consumer, is to explore the relationship between the perceived consumer vulnerability on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, focusing on the visually impaired and legally blind consumer, is to explore the relationship between the perceived consumer vulnerability on customer satisfaction and the effect of satisfaction on the intention of repurchase and recommendation as the determinants of store loyalty in an apparel store context.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on 216 visually impaired and legally blind consumers in the province of Manisa, Turkey, concerning their apparel shopping store experiences to examine how the perceived vulnerability influences visually impaired and legally blind consumers’ satisfaction, recommendation and repurchase intentions. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that as the visually impaired and legally blind consumers perceive themselves more vulnerable, they become more satisfied with the store, and that the more they are satisfied with the store, the more their intention to recommend that store and purchase intention from that store increases. However, the authors’ investigation showed no significant differences between the consumers who were born blind and who became blind later in their life.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by extending the understanding of visually impaired and legally blind consumers’ perceived vulnerability in the brick-and-mortar stores and demonstrates how it is related to satisfaction as a major driver of post-purchase intentions like recommendation and repurchase. It also exhibits the fact that blind consumers – both congenitally blind and subsequently blind – cope with this vulnerability through their own solutions to go on their lives, and they do not perceive themselves as vulnerable, as it is perceived by the able-bodied.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

1 – 7 of 7