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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Jung‐Wan Lee and Simon W. Tai

This study investigates motivators and inhibitors of entrepreneurship and small business development in the transitional economy of Kazakhstan in Central Asia. A…

Abstract

This study investigates motivators and inhibitors of entrepreneurship and small business development in the transitional economy of Kazakhstan in Central Asia. A qualitative research was used to obtain a macro view of developing entrepreneurship and small business in Kazakhstan. A focus group interview with entrepreneurs and small business owners was conducted during 2006. In general, factors that enhance entrepreneurship and small business development include encouraging social entrepreneurship, increasing credits availability, improving institutional environment and supports from international organisations. Selected policy and practical implications are identified, such as improving institutional development, creating supportive business environment, and promoting social entrepreneurship.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Jung‐Wan Lee and Simon W. Tai

This paper aims to investigate the concept of the standardisation of products and marketing communications in an emerging market. The paper further aims to introduce a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the concept of the standardisation of products and marketing communications in an emerging market. The paper further aims to introduce a logical connection between product attributes and consumers' perceptions of product quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Relationships between the product attributes of characteristic‐, benefit‐, image‐ and perceived‐product quality are hypothesized. The empirical data, which collected via a consumer survey in Almaty, Kazakhstan, are utilized to test hypotheses using structural equation modeling method.

Findings

This study finds that product attributes affect differentially to consumers' evaluation of product quality. For products with higher symbolic meanings such as the automobile in Central Asia, consumers are more sensitive to the benefit attribute of the product rather than the product characteristic attribute.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses a single product category and a single segment. Results need to be expanded and confirmed with other product categories in other emergent markets.

Practical implications

This study implies that, beyond product standardisation, multinational firms must develop strategic marketing communications by adapting the differences of values, expectations, needs of consumers towards global products, in particular, in emerging markets.

Originality/value

Very few studies in global marketing have been carried out in the Commonwealth Independent States region. In particular, to understand the intricacies of product quality judgment by Kazakh consumers towards global products is important to multinational firms that are operating in the region.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

James W. Bannister and David N. Wiest

Outlines previous research into the factors influencing managers’ choice of accounting procedures and auditors’ acceptance of them, including regulatory action by the US…

Abstract

Outlines previous research into the factors influencing managers’ choice of accounting procedures and auditors’ acceptance of them, including regulatory action by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Studies data from 1980‐1996 SEC enforcement actions against big five accounting firms or their staff to investigate the levels of discretionary accruals made by the relevant clients during the period of investigation. Explains how the discretionary accruals are estimated over various time frames and shows that clients have more income decreasing accruals as the investigation takes place. Considers possible reasons for this and concludes that it is due to the auditors becoming more conservative.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 27 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Barrie O. Pettman and Richard Dobbins

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Abstract

This issue is a selected bibliography covering the subject of leadership.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 21 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Sandra W.M. HO and Patrick P.H. NG

This paper studies the audit fee structure in Hong Kong. By analysing data concerning a number of variables representing auditee size, auditee risk, complexity of audit…

Abstract

This paper studies the audit fee structure in Hong Kong. By analysing data concerning a number of variables representing auditee size, auditee risk, complexity of audit, auditor identity, and the timing of audit, we develop a model of the determinants of audit fees which is applicable to the unique environment in Hong Kong. Using a more recent time period of 1992 and 1993, this study strongly confirms that most of the previous research findings are also applicable to the Hong Kong audit service market. We provide additional evidence relating to variables such as the Big Six (previously Big Eight) effects, auditee risk and auditee complexity which have been found to have inconclusive associations with the level of audit fees in previous research. Specifically, auditee size appears to have been the main determinant of audit fees, and the size measure is two‐dimensional, both asset and turnover respectively add explanatory power to that provided by each other. Complexity of audit adds significantly to the cost of audit. There is also evidence of Big Six effects and low‐balling. In addition, some evidence is found for the effects of auditee risk on audit fees. Finally, a longer audit delay, which reflects the possibility of inefficient audit time spent, entails higher audit fees. Future research should consider the importance of other issues such as non‐audit services and the extent of market concentration.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Stephanie A. Peak, Emily J. Hanson, Fade R. Eadeh and Alan J. Lambert

In a diverse society, empathy would intuitively seem to represent a powerful force for social good. In particular, we expect empathic people to tolerate (rather than…

Abstract

In a diverse society, empathy would intuitively seem to represent a powerful force for social good. In particular, we expect empathic people to tolerate (rather than reject) attitudes that might be different from their own, and to resolve and/or avoid (rather than escalate) potential disagreements with others. Some research supports this benign view of empathy, but somewhat surprisingly, there is a “dark” side to empathy, one that can sometimes exacerbate attitudinal conflict. That is, empathy can often be parochial, in the sense that people are inclined to reserve their compassion for others only when they are deemed to be worthy of such support. In this chapter we review classic and contemporary research on the light and dark side of empathy, and consider its implications for the kinds of dynamics that could potentially emerge when people encounter people and ideas that are different from their own.

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The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-710-6

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Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2010

Maarten Vansteenkiste, Christopher P. Niemiec and Bart Soenens

Cognitive evaluation theory (CET; Deci, 1975), SDT's first mini-theory, was built from research on the dynamic interplay between external events (e.g., rewards, choice…

Abstract

Cognitive evaluation theory (CET; Deci, 1975), SDT's first mini-theory, was built from research on the dynamic interplay between external events (e.g., rewards, choice) and people's task interest or enjoyment – that is, intrinsic motivation (IM). At the time, this research was quite controversial, as operant theory (Skinner, 1971) had dominated the psychological landscape. The central assumption of operant theory was that reinforcement contingencies in the environment control behavior, which precluded the existence of inherently satisfying activities performed for non-separable outcomes. During this time, Deci proposed that people – by nature – possess intrinsic motivation (IM), which can manifest as engagement in curiosity-based behaviors, discovery of new perspectives, and seeking out optimal challenges (see also Harlow, 1953; White, 1959). IM thus represents a manifestation of the organismic growth tendency and is readily observed in infants' and toddlers' exploratory behavior and play. Operationally, an intrinsically motivated activity is performed for its own sake – that is, the behavior is experienced as inherently satisfying. From an attributional perspective (deCharms, 1968), such behaviors have an internal perceived locus of causality, as people perceive their behavior as emanating from their sense of self, rather than from experiences of control or coercion.

Details

The Decade Ahead: Theoretical Perspectives on Motivation and Achievement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-111-5

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2021

Pornlapas Suwannarat

This study focuses on variations of the importance of core values through motivational domains of individuals by their cultural background. The effect of motivational…

Abstract

Purpose

This study focuses on variations of the importance of core values through motivational domains of individuals by their cultural background. The effect of motivational domains on operational performance has also been investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used survey as the main data collection method to elicit data from managerial workers in spa businesses in four regions of Thailand. An unpublished database of spa businesses was provided to the study by the Thai Chamber of Commerce.

Findings

Significant variations of the importance of motivational domains of managerial workers can be found according to the subculture of each of the four regions of Thailand. In addition, the motivational domains have found their significant impact on worker operational performance.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this study may be the distribution of samples because the study focuses on spa businesses, most of which in each region are located in big tourism provinces that may not be wholly representative of the characteristics of each region.

Practical implications

This study will be of practical value for practitioners or managers of any firms since it is important to consider value variations when assessing the operational performance; workers, especially managerial workers, in each subculture may have different priorities in the motivational domains of their lives. This could affect their operational performance.

Originality/value

This is an original attempt to ascertain variations of core values through motivational domains by subculture. It fills a knowledge gap in under-researched area in the literature since so far a few studies have examined this issue in the ASEAN countries.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Eric W.T. Ngai, Chuck C.H. Law, Simon C.H. Chan and Francis K.T. Wat

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the perceptions of the importance of the internet to human resource management (HRM) and to understand the existing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the perceptions of the importance of the internet to human resource management (HRM) and to understand the existing human resource (HR) practices and needs of the internet to support HRM functions.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey was used to collect data from selected public companies quoted on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange. Questionnaires were returned by 147 respondents and used for the analysis. The overall response rate was 29 percent, which was higher than expected.

Findings

The findings indicated that the most frequently cited internet‐supported HRM function in the existing literature is recruitment and selection. The results showed that there are no significant organization size differences or significant differences in internet connectivity as far as the perceived importance of the internet to HR practitioners is concerned. Specifically, helping managers to stay informed is the most important reason for adopting the internet for HR practitioners.

Originality/value

This study has proved that internet‐based HR offers enormous opportunities to improve organization performance. This paper introduces the reader to the potential use of the internet to support HRM.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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