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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Ares Kalandides, Steve Millington, Cathy Parker and Simon Quin

This paper aims to reflect upon a recent study trip to Berlin to offer some conclusions about similarities and differences in approaches to place management.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reflect upon a recent study trip to Berlin to offer some conclusions about similarities and differences in approaches to place management.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors start with a short overview of the visits made to City West (a shopping district), Bikini Berlin (a shopping centre), Visit Berlin (a destination management organisation), Leopoldplatz (a public square), Brunnenstrasse and Bayerischer Platz Quartier (both neighbourhoods), Markthalle IX (a covered market) and Prinzessinnengarten (an urban garden) before identifying some key lessons learnt.

Findings

The eight visits made as part of the study trip offered a brief but diverse insight into how different areas and functions of the city were managed, maintained, developed and promoted. Key lessons learnt and identified in the paper are as follows. Place management, as a practice, consists of people with passion working in partnership within the context of a place “patch”. Place management is practiced somewhere, and that somewhere has its own political, legal, economic, technological and social environment. People learn more about places in places. Place management is more akin to gardening than architecture.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions drawn in this paper are based, predominantly, upon the observations of the study trip facilitators, along with some comments and feedback from the delegates.

Practical implications

Place managers can and should learn from each other. Other places and people can be a source of inspiration – not necessarily providing a readily transferable solution (as the legal or political environments may not be conducive to carbon-copy interventions) – but offering alternative perspectives and approaches which can then be contextualised and adapted locally.

Social implications

Enlarging the pool of information and evidence from which practitioners can draw from when solving place problems can ultimately lead to places that are more successful, liveable and equitable.

Originality/value

Many place managers are volunteers or may not have access to a professional development budget. The authors hope that this paper can help to share the reflections of one study tour with a much wider audience.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2020

Julie Grail, Catherine Mitton, Nikos Ntounis, Cathy Parker, Simon Quin, Chloe Steadman, Gary Warnaby, Emily Cotterill and Diane Smith

The purpose of this paper is to review the development and current position of Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) in the UK, drawing on the content within a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the development and current position of Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) in the UK, drawing on the content within a State-of-the-Art Review of Business Improvement Districts in the UK: setting the agenda for policy, practice and research, commissioned by The BID Foundation and produced by members of the Institute of Place Management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is divided into seven main sections. The first section defines the concept of BIDs, outlines their process of establishment and provides a brief critique of BIDs from the academic literature. Second, the process of introducing BIDs into the UK is discussed. Third, the different types of BIDs that currently exist are detailed. The fourth section outlines the development of BIDs since their introduction in 2004. Fifth, an analysis of BID ballots is provided, involving details of ballot results, demonstrating a general improvement as BIDs develop over time. The sixth section comprises a discussion of unsuccessful ballots and BID terminations. The paper concludes with a brief analysis of issues BIDs face in the UK, looking into the future.

Findings

The paper contains three main empirical contributions: first, a numerical analysis of the different types of BIDs in the UK; second, a timeline of their development from 2005 to 2018; and third, a statistical analysis of BID ballot results over this period, with an indication of the numbers of unsuccessful ballots and BID terminations.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first comprehensive overview of BIDs in the UK detailing development and performance (e.g. ballot results) in the 15 years since their introduction.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Cathy Parker, Nikos Ntounis, Steve Millington, Simon Quin and Fernando Rey Castillo-Villar

The purpose of this paper is to document the results and the impact of the ESRC-funded High Street UK 2020 (HSUK2020), a project designed to take the existing academic…

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12628

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the results and the impact of the ESRC-funded High Street UK 2020 (HSUK2020), a project designed to take the existing academic knowledge relating to retail and high street change directly to UK High Streets, to improve local decision-making and, ultimately, their vitality and viability.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a systematic literature review, and by following the tenets of engaged scholarship, the authors identified 201 factors that influence the vitality and viability of town centres. Through the consensus-building Delphi technique, a panel of 20 retail experts identified the top 25 priorities for action.

Findings

Taking a place management approach led to the development of a more strategic framework for regeneration, which consisted of repositioning, reinventing, rebranding and restructuring strategies (4R’s of regeneration). Collaboration with the project towns resulted in identification of the strategy area that would add the most value, and the impact of the 4R’s and the top 25 priorities is demonstrated via numerous town examples.

Originality/value

Knowledge exchange projects, such as High Street UK2020, have an important contribution to make, not by developing even more theory that is unlikely to get utilised, instead their contribution is to bring existing theory into practical use.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Cathy Parker, John Byrom, Gareth Roberts and Simon Quin

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122

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Cathy Parker, John Byrom, Gareth Roberts and Simon Quin

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452

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Simon Quin

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478

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Cathy Parker and Gareth Roberts and Simon Quin

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99

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Cathy Parker, John Byrom, Gareth Roberts and Simon Quin

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309

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Cathy Parker, Gareth Roberts, Simon Quin and John Byrom

Downloads
124

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Cathy Parker, John Byrom, Simon Quin and Gareth Roberts

Downloads
330

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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