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Article

Joanne Evans, Barbara Reed, Henry Linger, Simon Goss, David Holmes, Jan Drobik, Bruce Woodyat and Simon Henbest

This paper aims to examine the role a recordkeeping informatics approach can play in understanding and addressing these challenges. In 2011, the Wind Tunnel located at the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role a recordkeeping informatics approach can play in understanding and addressing these challenges. In 2011, the Wind Tunnel located at the Defence Science Technology Organisation (DTSO)’s Fisherman’s Bend site in Melbourne and managed by the Flight Systems Branch (FSB) celebrated its 70th anniversary. While cause for celebration, it also raised concerns for DSTO aeronautical scientists and engineers as to capacities to effectively and efficiently manage the data legacy of such an important research facility for the next 70 years, given increased technological, organisational and collaboration complexities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper will detail how, through a collaborative action research project, the twin pillars of continuum thinking and recordkeeping metadata and the three facets of organisational culture, business process analysis and archival access, were used to examine the data, information, records and knowledge management challenges in this research data context. It will discuss how this perspective, was presented, engaged with and evolved into a set of strategies for the sustained development of FSB’s data, information and records management infrastructure, along with what is learnt about the approach through the action research process.

Findings

The project found that stressing the underlying principles of recordkeeping, applied to information resources of all kinds, resonated with the scientific community of FSB. It identified appropriate strategic, policy and process frameworks to better govern information management activities.

Research limitations/implications

The utility of a recordkeeping informatics approach to unpack, explore and develop strategies in technically and organisationally complex recordkeeping environment is demonstrated, along with the kinds of professional collaboration required to tackle research data challenges.

Practical implications

In embracing technical and organisational complexity, the project has provided FSB with a strategic framework for the development of their information architecture so that it is both responsive to local needs, and consistent with broader DSTO requirements.

Originality/value

This paper further develops recordkeeping informatics as an emerging approach for tackling the recordkeeping challenges of our era in relation to maintaining and sustaining the evidential authenticity, integrity and reliability of big complex research data sets.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Article

Simon Down

The purpose of this paper is to review the relevant literature concerning the skills and knowledge of owner‐managers in small firms and to show how these might be enhanced…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to review the relevant literature concerning the skills and knowledge of owner‐managers in small firms and to show how these might be enhanced and made more effective through alternative transferral and “teaching” strategies. It is shown that small firms are not isolated from their environment and are interdependently and inexorably linked with other organisations (suppliers, for instance). In this environment, and through these relationships, the majority of owner‐manager learning takes place. The implications for owner‐managers and the support environment are explored and recommendations for further research to explore the empirical reality of owner‐manager learning are presented.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Sonia Liff and Simon Turner

The rise of large out‐of‐town stores has received attention in terms of concern about the viability of town centres and local businesses and the environmental consequences…

Abstract

The rise of large out‐of‐town stores has received attention in terms of concern about the viability of town centres and local businesses and the environmental consequences of the increased car journeys generated by this change in shopping practices. This article explores whether the competitive pressures which small retailers are under have affected their employee relations. It is based on interviews with owner managers of butchers, greengrocers and newsagent shops in one location. Owner managers had different assessments of the nature of the competition they were facing and how they might continue to have a viable business. However, approaches to recruitment and selection and staff allocation seemed to have more to do with the limited labour market and the personal nature of the employment relationship than the approach taken to competition. Low wages, long hours and limited training remained the dominant features of both successful and unsuccessful businesses.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Sascha G. Walter and Simon Heinrichs

The purpose of this paper is to cumulate published empirical studies (1980-2009) on the relationship between individual variables and entrepreneurial status. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to cumulate published empirical studies (1980-2009) on the relationship between individual variables and entrepreneurial status. The authors categorize repeatedly analyzed determinants into six perspectives (trait, cognitive, affective, intentions, learning, and economic), review empirical findings for each determinant and each perspective, investigate trends in the field, and propose avenues for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors categorize determinants into one of the six paradigms and review findings for 46 repeatedly studied variables from 131 studies. Support for each variable, publication outlets chosen, and temporal trends in exploring entrepreneurial intentions, entrepreneurial status or differences between entrepreneurs and other individuals are analyzed.

Findings

Prior studies have focused on trait and economic perspectives with strong support, followed by the learning and intentions perspectives. The affective perspective is a still under-researched, yet growing field. Most articles were published in the 1990s. The emphasis on theoretical perspectives varies over decades. Directions for future research include integrating the perspectives (e.g. across the cognitive and affective domain), testing the temporal stability of influences, and developing and testing cross-level models that incorporate contextual influences.

Originality/value

The paper complements prior reviews and meta-analyses by picturing the breadth of the field and adding important points to the research agenda.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Richard T. Pascale

Many firms have adopted one or more “radical” management remedies in a quest for breakthroughs in performance. But their goal of “discontinuous” improvements usually has…

Abstract

Many firms have adopted one or more “radical” management remedies in a quest for breakthroughs in performance. But their goal of “discontinuous” improvements usually has an unspoken stipulation: change that causes breakdowns is not acceptable. A few innovative companies have found, however, that process and offering breakthroughs can't occur without carefully orchestrated management system conflict and breakdowns.

Details

Planning Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0094-064X

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Article

Simon Bridge

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the case for the inclusion, in enterprise education, of training and/or guidance in the acquisition and use of social capital.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the case for the inclusion, in enterprise education, of training and/or guidance in the acquisition and use of social capital.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the reasons, not just why social capital should be included as a factor at least as important as financial capital, but also the possible reasons why so far it has largely been omitted – and then explores the implications behind that omission.

Findings

The core assertion of the paper is that, despite its clear relevance, social capital is rarely included in enterprise education because the basis for much enterprise education is a traditional business plan menu which is in turn based on big business thinking.

Practical implications

The implications of this are not just that social capital should be given a key place in enterprise education but that, before this can happen, the different nature of small business needs to be accepted and the basis of small business training adjusted accordingly.

Originality/value

To date a lot of enterprise education and training has been based on the assumption that the traditional components of a business plan form a suitable agenda for enterprise education – either because it is directly based on a business plan or drawn from the same sort of thinking. The paper questions the validity of that assumption which excludes important factors such as social capital.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

David J. Faulds and Stephan F. Gohmann

The primary objective of this research was to develop a segmentation model for the United States Army Recruiting Command Headquarters (USAREC), located at Fort Knox…

Abstract

The primary objective of this research was to develop a segmentation model for the United States Army Recruiting Command Headquarters (USAREC), located at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The segmentation model was based on the MicroVision geodemographic system, developed by National Decisions Systems. Cluster analysis was used to develop the segmentation model. The research resulted in identifying 18 unique segments, or clusters, that were based on demographic and socioeconomic variables. The second objective of the research was to predict contract production within each market segment. The results of this portion of the analysis have allowed USAREC to more effectively establish and evaluate contract production goals across the command structure. The methodology employed in the research has wide applications to both the military and other service organizations that use geodemographic systems in their marketing programs.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Book part

Richard Hull

Purpose – This chapter describes how radical aims for community-owned broadband became compromised by the consequences of clientelism and elite patronage as some…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter describes how radical aims for community-owned broadband became compromised by the consequences of clientelism and elite patronage as some campaigners engaged in lobbying government.

Design/methodology/approach – Five years of participant observation and an auto-ethnographic methodology richly describe the author's involvement in a community broadband co-operative, various regional and national support groups and finally with a national group conducting campaigning, research and co-ordination activities for community ownership of Next Generation Access broadband.

Findings – This illustrates the difficulties faced by Third Sector and Civil Society organisations attempting to engage in lobbying activities in the same manner as conventional commercial lobbyists. In particular, it describes how lobbying necessitates a complex interlocking of activities, such as research, consultancy, conference organisation and other such forms of networking; and it describes how all of these activities can become subordinated to the interests of political patrons. It also suggests that the uncertainty around the meanings and relevance of the Third Sector/Civil Society has allowed the entry of older forms of exerting power such as clientelism and patronage.

Research limitations/implications – Further research is needed into a much larger group of organisations to examine the processes by which Third Sector and Civil Society groups engage with government.

Originality/value – The chapter uniquely applies Critical Management Studies and a political studies perspective on clientelism and patronage to the analysis of Third Sector and Civil Society organisations.

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Article

Maria Gebbels, Ioannis S. Pantelidis and Steven Goss-Turner

This paper aims to examine the interplay between self-efficacy and career inheritance and its influence on career commitment in the hospitality sector. High labour…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the interplay between self-efficacy and career inheritance and its influence on career commitment in the hospitality sector. High labour turnover, unclear career paths and the transient nature of the work available in hospitality render it a suitable industry context that allows us to explore career commitment patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on life history methodology, semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospitality professionals holding a relevant degree but no longer employed in the hospitality industry.

Findings

The findings revealed the interplay between self-efficacy, career inheritance and career commitment, as well as the speed of decline of career commitment, visualised as patterns of the leaving process. Although an infinite number of variations are possible, data unveiled the three main patterns.

Research limitations/implications

The schematic illustrations of the patterns of the leaving process are not representative. The purposive sample comprises only ex-hospitality professionals, and generalisations can be considered in future studies.

Practical implications

This newly conceptualised understanding of career commitment enables researchers to reconsider the fundamental reasons why individuals leave the hospitality industry, whilst also offering hospitality managers deeper insights into how the three identified patterns could inform recruitment and selection.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature through its meaningful theoretical extension in the context of career development studies. The unique concept of the leaving process addresses the prevalent issue of turnover and generates important implications.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Book part

Anna-Mari Simunaniemi, Riitta Forsten-Astikainen, Kai Hänninen and Matti Muhos

This case study describes practices in a micro-entrepreneur peer-to-peer network (MicroENTRE network), an example of a community of practice (CoP) where entrepreneurs…

Abstract

This case study describes practices in a micro-entrepreneur peer-to-peer network (MicroENTRE network), an example of a community of practice (CoP) where entrepreneurs, researchers and local public business advisory services (PBAS) seek to promote entrepreneurial behaviour through joint activities, such as sharing ideas, peer learning and business development. The concept was originally established to address the practical needs of micro-entrepreneurs and business development agencies in sparsely populated areas (SPA). Through the network, micro-entrepreneurs and PBAS are provided with direct contact to the university research team, which transfers recent research-based knowledge to the network. This chapter bridges the literature on micro-entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial behaviour in networks through an empirical description of micro-entrepreneurs’ activities in the context of a peer-to-peer network using the typical CoP activity classifications developed by Wenger as the framework. The case study is based on the longitudinal analysis of monthly meetings (from 2015 to 2019) of 13 micro-entrepreneur groups. The data consist of participatory observations during the network meetings and the audio recordings and meeting memos of the authors. The findings describe typical examples of CoP activities in the network. For example, entrepreneurs use the network to share ideas, make requests for advice based on experience of fellow entrepreneurs and reuse the assets of other network members. Moreover, the data show that regular, peer-to-peer network meetings, jointly facilitated by PBAS and researchers, are an acceptable and accessible platform for micro-enterprise development in SPA.

Details

The Entrepreneurial Behaviour: Unveiling the cognitive and emotional aspect of entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-508-6

Keywords

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