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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Virginia Pearson and Simon Chant

The organisation of health and social care in Devon including Torbay and Plymouth has developed over the last few years into different organisational structures. This…

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Abstract

Purpose

The organisation of health and social care in Devon including Torbay and Plymouth has developed over the last few years into different organisational structures. This paper aims to compare these different models.

Design/methodology/approach

Routine information and audit data were analysed to explore what was known about the different organisational models in health and social care in Devon.

Findings

There is evidence from these data that more highly integrated models of care have demonstrable benefits for users and for local health and social care economies.

Research limitations/implications

The local organisational models are complex and it is not known whether they are transferable to other settings. The data used in the study are routine data, and therefore, may include confounding factors; the local audit data may be subject to observer error. More research is recommended in this area.

Practical implications

As health and social care services move towards greater integration and the health care market creates different combinations of provider integration, this paper discusses what routine data can tell us about these models of care and what the implications are for both commissioners and providers of health and social care in the future.

Originality/value

Benefits of health and social care integration are often described by case study and this review using quantitative data adds to the evidence base supporting integration as a way forward.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1974

Denning, L.J. Orr and L.J. Roskill

May 7, 1974 Iron and Steel — Reorganization — Resettlement compensation — Report to the Minister recommending reorganization — Industry reorganized consequent on report …

Abstract

May 7, 1974 Iron and Steel — Reorganization — Resettlement compensation — Report to the Minister recommending reorganization — Industry reorganized consequent on report — Recession in industry — Closure of mills — Employees suffering loss of employment — Whether loss of employment “in consequence of a relevant event” — Whether employees entitled to resettlement compensation — Iron and Steel (Compensation to Employees) Regulations, 1968 (S.I. 1968, No. 1170).

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Managerial Law, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2008

Alan R. Sandstrom

Nahua ritual specialists of northern Veracruz, Mexico, portray spirit entities by cutting their images from paper. Paper cutting is an ancient craft in Mesoamerica that…

Abstract

Nahua ritual specialists of northern Veracruz, Mexico, portray spirit entities by cutting their images from paper. Paper cutting is an ancient craft in Mesoamerica that traces back to the pre-Hispanic era. The impetus to materialize the spirits in this way is the result of the highly abstract and pantheistic nature of the Nahua religious system. In pantheistic thought, the cosmos itself is the deity and all apparent diversity can be seen as different aspects or manifestations of a seamless sacred unity. The Nahua ritual specialist places the paper figures on elaborate altars where he or she dedicates special offerings to them. The fundamentally economic nature of Nahua ritual exchange is revealed – with the aid of ritual economy – through examination of multiple factors: the symbolic meanings of sacred chanting and altar construction, the role of religion in constituting Nahua ethnic identity in the face of domination by mestizo elites, and the ecological context that renders life precarious for indigenous horticulturalists of this region of Mexico.

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Dimensions of Ritual Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-546-8

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2013

Jenny Ritchie, Sandy Morrison, Timote Vaioleti and Te Whaiwhaia Ritchie

In this chapter the authors take an auto-ethnographic approach to draw from recent experiences of being integrally involved in the death rituals pertaining to a close…

Abstract

In this chapter the authors take an auto-ethnographic approach to draw from recent experiences of being integrally involved in the death rituals pertaining to a close family member, ranging across three different cultural backgrounds, all located in Aotearoa New Zealand and involving intercultural complexities. All of these funeral proceedings were unusual circumstances, due to the status of the deceased, meaning that in all three instances, the rituals were very public, due to cultural expectations. Through narrative descriptions, this chapter illuminates the ways in which traditional cultural values are played out in contemporary contexts and their importance in providing a framework of support for the bereaved families through the mourning period, albeit in the public gaze. Despite the impacts of colonization, immigration, and globalization, these traditional practices, passed down through generation after generation, demonstrate their resilience and contemporary application in service of the emotional and spiritual well-being of the respective collectives.

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40th Anniversary of Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-783-2

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Peripatetic Journey of Teacher Preparation in Canada
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-239-1

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Mary Yee

This chapter examined the lived experiences of first generation Asian immigrant student activists, who waged a powerful struggle against school violence in a large urban…

Abstract

This chapter examined the lived experiences of first generation Asian immigrant student activists, who waged a powerful struggle against school violence in a large urban high school. Their struggle resisted the hegemonic practices of the district bureaucracy around racial harassment, bullying, and treatment of immigrant students, especially English Language Learners (ELLs). Mobilizing both inside and outside of school, the student activists initiated legal action, organized among their high school peers and in the Asian community, and disrupted dominant discourses about the Asian community and the abilities of first generation immigrant youth.

Using ethnographic methods such as interviews, focus groups, and analysis of archival data, the author focused on four student leaders from working class backgrounds, examining the identities and literacies they developed in the process of understanding the power dynamics between dominant institutions and racialized communities. Moreover, using the lenses of Bourdieusian and Freirean social theory, this qualitative study looked at the roles that culture and ideology, broadly construed, played in the young people’s political development and their post-secondary trajectories. This work also built on the work of Shawn Ginwright, Julio Cammarota, and Michelle Fine on youth activism and community change. The significance of this chapter lies in its contribution to the research about the intersectionality of race/ethnicity, class, immigration status, and youth activism, in particular for first generation immigrant youth.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2018

Charles I. Guarria

Abstract

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Proposition 13 – America’s Second Great Tax Revolt: A Forty Year Struggle for Library Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-018-9

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Book part
Publication date: 29 October 2013

K. C. Sreekumar

The threat posed by nuclear weapons to world peace need not be exaggerated. Advancement in science and technology has enabled us to go for a complete annihilation of not…

Abstract

The threat posed by nuclear weapons to world peace need not be exaggerated. Advancement in science and technology has enabled us to go for a complete annihilation of not only the Homo sapiens but all the species on earth. Should we permit our idiocy entangled with the nuclear weapons to destroy us or should we, the thinking animals, permit our wisdom to outlive the demonic nuclear weapons, is a question that is being asked by sensible people all over the world today. Just public denouncement of weapons of mass destruction is un-utilitarian. Mankind has been hearing such hollow, absurd words ever since the first atomic test. We have been feeding ourselves on a diet of hypocrisy. If it is not that what else is CTBT? Should the world permit demons to chant mantra? Isn’t it time to recognize that the world is governed not by saints but by Satans? (This is because rise and fall of civilizations has taught us that might is still right.) Isn’t it time to understand that only a metamorphosis of the Satans into saints can save the world? If we know that well, we should start thinking how the nuclear Satans could be transformed into nuclear saints and it is only logical that the nuke Satans should take initiative in transforming themselves, which alone would salvage the world. The present study is premised on these assumptions.

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Nuclear Disarmament: Regional Perspectives on Progress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-722-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1986

Robert E. Boyer

September is National Cheerleading Month, a time filled with the excitement of returning to school and the renewed hope for a championship year for the school teams.

Abstract

September is National Cheerleading Month, a time filled with the excitement of returning to school and the renewed hope for a championship year for the school teams.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1985

Shyam Kamath

This paper uses Sims‐Granger causality to examine the causal relationships between (1) the money stock and income, and (2) the reserve money base and the money stock for…

Abstract

This paper uses Sims‐Granger causality to examine the causal relationships between (1) the money stock and income, and (2) the reserve money base and the money stock for India. These relationships are empirically investigated so as to determine the role of money in economic activity and the role and channels of monetary policy in a developing economy. Both the conventional regression method used by Sims and the more recent time‐series method developed by Box and Jenkins are utilised in the tests. The results indicate (a) that money does not play a causal role in economic activity while conventional money‐demand functions with income as the right‐hand side variable are vindicated, and (b) there is weak support for the Central Bank's alleged control over the money stock through control over the reserve money base. The differing nature of the results with respect to the two methods adopted point towards the sensitivity of the Sims‐Granger causality test to the type of filtering procedure chosen.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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