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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Nick Burton and Simon Chadwick

The purpose of this paper is to explore attitudes towards ambush marketing at the 2016 Union of European Football Associations European Championships, seeking to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore attitudes towards ambush marketing at the 2016 Union of European Football Associations European Championships, seeking to examine fan affect towards ambush marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

A 24-item survey questionnaire was constructed, exploring consumers’ general cognition and affection of ambush marketing; following Dickson et al.’s (2015) design, industry-specific attitudes were canvassed, assessing supporters’ views of beer and gambling industry ambush marketers.

Findings

Results indicate that fans appear to be marginally more forgiving of ambush practices from beer or gambling brands than across ambushing more generally, yet a prevailing antipathy towards ambush marketing from an ethical perspective was observed. Importantly, however, the study’s findings suggest that industry-specific advertising regulations bear little impact on fan perspectives.

Practical implications

The study’s results bear notable implications for marketing theory and practice: for ambushing brands, this suggests that they are rather less likely to be have a disruptive effect on events and their official sponsors. For official sponsors, a level of threat from ambushers nevertheless remains as it would appear consumers do not have strong views about the practice of ambushing.

Originality/value

The study’s methods build upon and extend previous studies into consumer attitudes towards ambush marketing, specifically focusing on the perceptions and affect of fans in lieu of more empirically generalisable consumer populations. Given the target audiences of sponsors and ambush marketers, this emphasis on fan attitudes represents an important direction in ambush affect research.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 May 2019

Paul Widdop, Simon Chadwick and Daniel Parnell

Abstract

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Petros Parganas, Christos Anagnostopoulos and Simon Chadwick

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of social media in brand associations, particularly in regard to soccer fan clubs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of social media in brand associations, particularly in regard to soccer fan clubs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a professional English Premier League soccer team to investigate the effects that social media interaction had on brand associations of the team’s fan clubs in two national contexts – England and Greece.

Findings

In total, 207 online questionnaires from six fan clubs were collected and analyzed using descriptive and inferential (t-tests and χ2 tests) statistics.

Originality/value

The results revealed similarities on Facebook in terms of positive receptions of brand attributes and resonance of perceived brand benefits, while significant differences were observed on Twitter, particularly in terms of brand benefits.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Leah Gillooly, Christos Anagnostopoulos and Simon Chadwick

The purpose of this paper is to thematically categorise sports sponsorship-linked Twitter content and, by drawing on uses & gratifications theory, to map the extent to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to thematically categorise sports sponsorship-linked Twitter content and, by drawing on uses & gratifications theory, to map the extent to which these categories cohere with known user motivations for consuming social media.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative content analysis of a sample of 1,502 tweets by London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games sponsors posted between January 2011 and September 2012 was used to develop the typology of sponsorship-linked Twitter content.

Findings

From the data, a typology is developed, comprising 17 categories grouped under four main types: informing, entertaining, rewarding and interacting. The majority of sponsor tweets (68 per cent) fell into the informing type, with 17 per cent categorised as interacting. While few (2 per cent) tweets were categorised as entertaining, the link to the sponsored event implies a degree of entertaining content even in ostensibly informative, rewarding or interactional sponsorship-linked tweets. Therefore, the typology categories highlight Twitter content produced by sponsors which engages customers, fostering dialogue alongside providing informative and entertaining content.

Practical implications

The typology can inform practitioners’ future sports sponsorship activation planning decisions and can also aid rights holders in tailoring appropriate sponsorship opportunities to potential sponsors, based on an appreciation of the nature of content sought by brand followers.

Originality/value

The typology extends existing understanding of the use of social media within sponsorship activation campaigns by thematically categorising content and mapping this against known user motivations for consuming brand-related social media content.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1999

Simon Chadwick

The main focus of this paper is a case study of the progression links onto a new undergraduate business programme (Business Enterprise) that have been established for…

Abstract

The main focus of this paper is a case study of the progression links onto a new undergraduate business programme (Business Enterprise) that have been established for modern apprentices between Coventry Business School and Coventry and Warwickshire Chamber of Commerce, Training and Enterprise. The context of the relationship between the two is initially established and this leads to an overview of the findings generated by a research study designed to highlight the views and expectations of major stakeholders in the apprenticeship scheme. In turn, this subsequently leads to an exploration of the implications for the design of higher education programmes targeted at apprentices.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Content available

Abstract

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2006

Roger A. Chadwick, Skye L. Pazuchanics and Douglas J. Gillan

Imagine trying to navigate through your environment while looking straight ahead through a narrow tube. These are essentially the conditions the operator of an ROV in…

Abstract

Imagine trying to navigate through your environment while looking straight ahead through a narrow tube. These are essentially the conditions the operator of an ROV in teleoperation mode may have to contend with. We hypothesized that controlling ground-based ROVs would be easier if an operator developed an explicit overview of the space in which the ROV was maneuvering. Accordingly, we conducted a study in which we had naive undergraduate participants explore a maze-like virtual desert environment while drawing a map of the area. After completing a 30-min mapping task, participants re-entered the maze to search for and retrieve a target object. The virtual robots and landscape, which had minimal landmarks and a maze of navigable paths (see Fig. 1), were created using CeeBot (see Chadwick, Gillan, Simon, & Pazuchanics, 2004, for a discussion of the CeeBot tool). Maps drawn by participants were rated independently by three raters (graduate psychology students) for the usefulness of the map for navigating the area on a scale from 1 (not at all useful) to 7 (extremely useful). Cronbach's alpha was computed as a consistency estimate of inter-rater reliability at 0.96.

Details

Human Factors of Remotely Operated Vehicles
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-247-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Simon Chadwick

The main focus of the paper is an examination of the nature of sponsor commitment to a team, an event or a sport. Established notions of “sponsor commitment” typically…

Abstract

The main focus of the paper is an examination of the nature of sponsor commitment to a team, an event or a sport. Established notions of “sponsor commitment” typically involve the sponsor engaging in a transaction with a sponsored property. Through this process a sum of money is paid to property managers in return for which the sponsor expects to achieve a tangible outcome. The paper argues that this is a crude view of commitment, and highlights the relevance of a more collaborative and relational perspective of sponsor commitment. It begins with an examination of the relationship literature, highlighting the important role of commitment between collaborative partners, and concludes by exploring a range of implications for sponsorship managers embracing a broader view of commitment.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Simon Chadwick

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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