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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2009

Silpa Sagheer, S.S. Yadav and S.G. Deshmukh

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework and set of propositions to analyze competitiveness of India's agrifood chain. Nine components constitute the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework and set of propositions to analyze competitiveness of India's agrifood chain. Nine components constitute the framework. These are identified on the basis of theoretical studies and expert consultations. Each component leads to at least one proposition.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is dependent on two major streams of management – value chain analysis (VCA) and strategic competitiveness. Porter's diamond at the industry level and Momaya's asset‐process‐performance (APP) model at the firm level provide the base for competitiveness discussions.

Findings

The framework comprises of “human” and “non‐human” components. They are more like members of a network where action of each has an impact on the other. By examining the roles of human components like national government, producers, processors, etc. and non‐human components like food quality, regulatory scenario, etc. side‐by‐side, this study breaks new grounds in exploring the synergy of VCA and competitiveness management.

Research limitations/implications

Journal papers based on Indian food industry's competitiveness or supply chain are very limited. There is also a dearth of literature on India's agrifood sector. This has reduced the scope for published references from India.

Practical implications

The paper can serve as a reference point for researchers/students and other stakeholders interested in Indian food and retail industry. The framework has implications for developing countries like India that are exploring opportunities in global retail diffusions. It is also of use to researchers from developing economies where the role of “national government” can be significant in the development of an industry. The framework is built as a flexible and adaptable tool, which can suit other industry sectors with minor modifications.

Originality/value

The paper has attempted to create a common ground where the two theories of VCA and competitiveness are able to meet. An empirical validation of the framework can encourage more future research on this topic. This paper can also be used by researchers as a reference point for studies on Indian agrifood sector. The proposed framework can be used as an analytical tool by researchers to study similar industries from developing economies like textiles, leather, etc. that are unorganized.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

Silpa Sagheer, Surendra S. Yadav and S.G. Deshmukh

The aim of this paper is to identify and analyze critical factors/elements influencing standards compliance and their level of influence in a developing country food…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify and analyze critical factors/elements influencing standards compliance and their level of influence in a developing country food industry, with specific reference to India.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 13 critical elements were identified and structured using pair‐wise comparisons. Structural and reachability matrices were formed and iterated to yield levels of hierarchical influence of each element. MICMAC analysis was also performed to determine dependency and driving power of these elements.

Findings

The analysis brought out a compelling need for “sensitive and responsive” action by developing country governments while competing globally. Food industries in developing countries tend to detour while complying with standards, owing to costs involved in setting up systems and procedures. While a strong surveillance mechanism is the high point of a good compliant system this has to be preceded by supporting measures such as linking of domestic and international markets, consolidation of institutional structures, strengthening of legal/regulatory systems, etc.

Practical implications

Use of interpretative structural modeling (ISM) is inspired by the versatility displayed by this method, as reported by researchers, across a wide spectrum of economic and competitive complexities affecting businesses.

Originality/value

The study is a hitherto unexplored attempt, using interpretative structural modeling, to analyze standards compliance in a developing country's food industry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 58 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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