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Article
Publication date: 3 November 2021

Michael Breum Ramsgaard and Per Blenker

The importance of contextualizing theory development in entrepreneurship education has recently been raised. Nevertheless, efforts often lead to rather decontextualized…

Abstract

Purpose

The importance of contextualizing theory development in entrepreneurship education has recently been raised. Nevertheless, efforts often lead to rather decontextualized concepts and generic theories that are unable to bring together the complexities of applying entrepreneurship education to particular institutional logics and local pedagogical understandings. Based on a narrow and selective literature review, this study aims to identify and reconstruct how entrepreneurship education can adjust to the disciplines in which it unfolds. To contribute to transcending this dilemma, this article raises the following question: How can entrepreneurship education be understood in a differentiated manner and contextually reconstructed to the many disciplines and professions in which it unfolds?

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows the general idea of an integrative literature review, meaning that a few references, in particular Jones' work on a signature pedagogy for entrepreneurship education, led to a deeper search of the older background literature from Shulman on the idea of a signature pedagogy for professions.

Findings

The authors identify three existing notions (MK-0, MK-1 and MK-2) of signature pedagogy within entrepreneurship education and propose a fourth notion that combines the established understandings into a signature pedagogy, MK-3, in which entrepreneurship education should be adjusted to the disciplines in which it unfolds, by integrating and balancing general, disciplinary/professional and entrepreneurial purposes of education.

Originality/value

Accepting that context matters to entrepreneurship education creates a need for understanding the contextual influence on pedagogies. The paper contributes by establishing a theory-based framework that can help educators formulate and balance general, professional and entrepreneurial purposes of education, depending on the particular context of their educational activities. Furthermore, the paper is a call to action for additional scholarship that identifies avenues for future research.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Nicola Carr and Kym Fraser

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply…

Abstract

International figures on university expenditure on the development of next generation learning spaces (NGLS) are not readily available but anecdote suggests that simply retrofitting an existing classroom as an NGLS conservatively costs $AUD200,000, while developing new buildings often cost in the region of 100 million dollars and over the last five years, many universities in Australia, Europe and North America have developed new buildings. Despite this considerable investment, it appears that the full potential of these spaces is not being realised.

While researchers argue that a more student centred learning approach to teaching has inspired the design of next generation learning spaces (Tom, Voss, & Scheetz, 2008) and that changed spaces change practice (Joint Information Systems Committee, 2009) when ‘confronted’ with a next generation learning spaces for the first time, anecdotes suggest that many academics resort to teaching as they have always taught and as they were taught. This chapter highlights factors that influence teaching practices, showing that they are to be found in the external, organisational and personal domains.

We argue that in order to fully realise significant improvements in student outcomes through the sector’s investment in next generation learning spaces, universities need to provide holistic and systematic support across three domains – the external, the organisational and the personal domains, by changing policies, systems, procedures and localised practices to better facilitate changes in teaching practices that maximise the potential of next generation learning spaces.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Colin Jones

The purpose of this paper is to address the increasing demand for entrepreneurship education (EE) across all levels of education globally. Specifically, the need to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the increasing demand for entrepreneurship education (EE) across all levels of education globally. Specifically, the need to identify a signature pedagogy for entrepreneurship that can be used in all teaching and learning contexts associated with all forms of EE.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper draws upon the seminal work of Lee Shulman to contemplate and propose a signature pedagogy for EE. Contemporary ideas from the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) literature are also used to develop a sound pedagogical foundation for the approach advocated.

Findings

This paper proposes an innovative solution that addresses the challenge of defining what minimally speaking, is EE? The development of a signature pedagogy for EE provides clarity around the challenge of developing a standard minimalist approach to teaching entrepreneurship.

Practical implications

There are important implications that arise from this paper for all educators of entrepreneurship. Most importantly being that we can all share a SoTL regardless of the context of the author’s teaching.

Originality/value

This paper presents new thinking that has the potential to fundamentally reshape how we conceive the process of designing and delivering EE. Importantly, this paper contributes to the future development of SoTL in EE.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2021

Stephanie Best, Christian Beech, Iain J. Robbé and Sharon Williams

One overlooked determinant of interprofessional teamwork is the mobilisation of professional identity. Taking a health or social care practitioner out of their…

Abstract

Purpose

One overlooked determinant of interprofessional teamwork is the mobilisation of professional identity. Taking a health or social care practitioner out of their professional silo and placing them in an interprofessional team setting will challenge their professional identity. The theory of signature pedagogy was used to investigate the challenges and what is needed to support practitioners to mobilise their professional identity to maximise teamwork.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional mixed methods study was undertaken in the form of three focus groups, with members of health and social care teams in Wales, UK. Using nominal group technique, participants explored and ranked the challenges and benefits of mobilising their professional identity within an interprofessional setting.

Findings

Findings on mobilising professional identity were found to be aligned closely with the three signature pedagogy apprenticeships of learning to think and to perform like others in their profession and to act with moral integrity. The biggest challenge facing practitioners was thinking like others in their profession while in an interprofessional team.

Research limitations/implications

The focus of this study is health and social care teams within Wales, UK, which may limit the results to teams that have a similar representation of professionals.

Practical implications

Healthcare leaders should be aware of the opportunities to promote mobilisation of professional identity to maximise teamwork. For example, at induction, by introducing the different roles and shared responsibilities. Such practical implications do have consequences for policy as regards interprofessional team development and organisational commitments to adult learning and evaluation.

Originality/value

This is the first study of professional identity of interprofessional healthcare and social professionals using signature pedagogy to gain a better understanding of teamwork.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2014

Alison Taysum and Charles L. Slater

This chapter focuses on the dispositions and values of The Education Doctorate (Ed.D.) students in England and the United States as they conducted research, graduated, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter focuses on the dispositions and values of The Education Doctorate (Ed.D.) students in England and the United States as they conducted research, graduated, and entered their work communities.

Methods

We will present a brief review of the history of the Ed.D. and an explanation of signature pedagogy, which leads to a consideration of values, particularly as they relate to the connection between the researcher and the community. A synthesis of Banks (1991, 1998) description of the researcher’s position and stages of ethnic development provide a framework to analyze the experience of a doctoral student in England and a doctoral student in the United States.

Findings

The leaders developed multicultural dispositions through doctoral pedagogies that included the supervised creation of a doctoral thesis in a Higher Education Institution with access to resources. The resources included pedagogical relationships with program providers, a library and access to intellectual networks that built leadership capacity within the doctoral education system. Leaders designing and implementing their research and drafting and redrafting their doctoral thesis, engaged with pedagogies that developed a deep understanding of “what counts as evidence,” and critical and reflective thinking tools that enhanced their multicultural dispositions and habits of hearts, minds and hands.

Practical and social implications

The findings may contribute to informing decisions to invest in the doctoral dividend, policy and a research agenda into doctoral pedagogies.

Original value

New insights into the benefits of educational leaders investing in the doctoral dividend are revealed.

Details

Investing in our Education: Leading, Learning, Researching and the Doctorate
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-131-2

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Heinz‐Dieter Meyer and Brenda Shannon

The purpose of this paper is to propose, as a candidate for a signature pedagogy, a method centered on case writing and peer review.

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944

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose, as a candidate for a signature pedagogy, a method centered on case writing and peer review.

Design/methodology/approach

In this method, aspiring education leaders use the writing of case studies – frequently featuring themselves as an actor in a narrative of organizational development or change – to advance their reflection in and on action. The study is then shared with members of the candidate's peer group (cohort members, faculty, or senior practitioners) as a step to building and integrating the candidate in a community of practice. To illustrate, the authors publish the case of a novice school‐leader's voyage to create unity and solidarity among a divided staff. The paper shows that case writing can enrich our arsenal of pedagogies that move the novice beyond the dualism of scholarship and practice.

Findings

Case writing uniquely facilitates reflection‐in‐action and the building of communities of practice.

Practical implications

Innovative pedagogies are required if practitioner education and training are to take their distinct place next to that of researchers and academics.

Originality/value

This paper describes the use of case writing cum peer review as a tool to develop the practical knowledge of fledgling educational leaders.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Early Careers in Education: Perspectives for Students and NQTs
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-585-9

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Finbar Lillis and Darryll Bravenboer

This article draws on a study of best practices in work-integrated learning (WIL) identified in the Middlesex University Degree Apprenticeships Development Fund (DADF…

Abstract

Purpose

This article draws on a study of best practices in work-integrated learning (WIL) identified in the Middlesex University Degree Apprenticeships Development Fund (DADF) Project, which examined their application for four public sector degree apprenticeships (DAs). The authors suggest that WIL pedagogical practices deployed to deliver DAs can bridge traditional pedagogical and occupational divisions while building institutional resilience in a post-viral world. The paper is intended to contribute to both practitioner and policy-level discourse regarding the best practice in WIL for DAs.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of key texts was used to identify “success characteristics” in WIL “signaturepedagogies, with potential applicability for DA design and delivery. These characteristics were used to frame interrogation of best pedagogical practices, using the best practice matrix developed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with selected expert practitioners to examine their matrix responses and to discuss the researcher's initial “read-across” analysis of best practices and possible implications for pedagogical practice in WIL for DAs across other sectors. This paper also draws on feedback from employer groups who were consulted on the project report recommendations and further feedback from a national project dissemination conference in 2018. The findings from the research project have also been re-evaluated with reference to further literature in the context of the challenges presented by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Findings

The findings from the study indicate that pedagogical best practices were to a significant degree transferable across professions and sectors; success characteristics in one pedagogical area (for example, mentoring/practice education) underpin success in another (recognition of prior learning [RPL] and practice-based assessment of achievement); success characteristics in WIL can also be applied and operated across professions and sectors to demonstrate how the best practice in WIL should be applied in the design of DAs more generally.

Research limitations/implications

The original project research study focussed on WIL pedagogical practices in four specified professions across four public sectors within one institution. This approach, though limited, enabled the research study to focus on in-depth qualitative interactions with practitioners from different sectors rather than institutional differences. As a consequence, the research study was able to focus on in-depth and dynamic interrelationships in pedagogical practice from the perspective of the professions, which facilitated productive examination of similarities and differences across these professions.

Originality/value

The research study provided evidence of the potential value of a more explicit recognition of WIL practice in the higher education sector and how consistent approaches to WIL should inform programme design. This has potential to improve the quality of curriculum design and pedagogy across DA programmes and provide a valuable reference point for quality assuring this provision.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2016

Jessica L. Riviere

Riviere’s article questions qualifying exams in US graduate education, completed after 1–2 year of PhD coursework and before submitting a dissertation proposal, as an…

Abstract

Riviere’s article questions qualifying exams in US graduate education, completed after 1–2 year of PhD coursework and before submitting a dissertation proposal, as an assessment tool for graduate students’ preparedness as “stewards of the discipline” (Golde, Walker & Associates, 2006). A qualifying portfolio containing examples of professional work and reflections by the student on her own progress assesses disciplinary and professional knowledge. Graduate coursework prepares students to produce research in two important genres: the journal article and the monograph (practiced as seminar papers and the dissertation, respectively). Other professional genres of writing, such as the scholarly book review, the course syllabus, and the peer review process are rarely explicitly taught. All three are a required element of an academic career, and indicative of the kinds of lines of inquiry demanded of a scholar in the humanities. Beyond the preparation for an academic career, the chapter suggests that a portfolio would also be useful evidence of qualifications for careers outside the university. Riviere focuses specifically on graduate students in the humanities, but the suggestions for can be usefully extrapolated to other disciplines.

Details

Emerging Directions in Doctoral Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-135-4

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Book part
Publication date: 11 October 2017

Adrian Crookes

In the context of debates about the performance of Higher Education (HE) in which quantitative measures proliferate, this chapter reports the top line observations of an…

Abstract

In the context of debates about the performance of Higher Education (HE) in which quantitative measures proliferate, this chapter reports the top line observations of an initial exploration of the preparedness for practice of recent graduates of a Public Relations (PR) course at a post-1992 United Kingdom (UK) Higher Education Institution (HEI). Preparedness for practice is chosen as a conceptual lens (as preparedness for the uncertainty of practice) because HEIs frequently promise it. Using a Bourdieusian framework, preparedness is considered in relation to habitus-field match and HE performance as capital-added in habitus transformation. The chapter offers a complementary way of considering the dynamic between educator and recent graduate agency and how that might be applied when studying course and student performance, designing curricula and developing appropriate ‘signature pedagogies’, especially for those HE actors tasked with delivering against the ‘promise’ of graduate preparedness. In considering preparedness for practice as a performative function of HE, the chapter is located in wider societal debates about the ‘worth’ of HE and offers insight for educators of future PR practitioners.

Details

How Strategic Communication Shapes Value and Innovation in Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-716-4

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