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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Kass Gibson and Paul Gorczynski

This chapter outlines the paucity of media research attending to mental health and mental illness in sport. As such, the purpose of this chapter is to encourage critical…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter outlines the paucity of media research attending to mental health and mental illness in sport. As such, the purpose of this chapter is to encourage critical reflection and further research on the mass mediation of mental illness in sport.

Design/Method/Approach

In the first part of the chapter, we review the extensive literature addressing the mass mediation of mental illness and mental health in order to provide key reference points for future scholarship. We then suggest to potential avenues for sociological study of this topic: Talcott Parson’s sick role and Guy Debord’s spectacle.

Findings

The authors find that the notion of the sick role provides insight into the assumptions underpinning athlete disclosure of mental illness as well as encouragement of help seeking behavior in relation to mental illness specifically. From a broader perspective on mental health, the authors identify a central challenge of the spectacular presentation of mental health and well-being and the lived experience.

Research Limitations/Implications

The central limitation of the field currently is the dearth of research. Similarly, in providing a broad overview of key considerations, this chapter does not undertake primary media analysis of mental illness in sport. Nonetheless, the authors outline key considerations and lines of inquiry for the field.

Details

Sport, Mental Illness, and Sociology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-469-1

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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Nana Tuntiya

The chapter revisits the concept of social stigma viewed from the perspective of mental patients integrated in the community based on the example of Geel, Belgium that…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter revisits the concept of social stigma viewed from the perspective of mental patients integrated in the community based on the example of Geel, Belgium that historically utilized a family care model for a significant number of patients with severe mental illness.

Methodology/approach

Interpretive analysis of data presented in ethnographies on the Geel colony by Roosens (1979) and Roosens and Van de Walle (2007), showcasing 30 patients’ case studies in addition to research-based author narratives.

Findings

This study demonstrates that chronic mental patients tend to reject the sick role and the stigma associated with it by trying to influence their social image and how their status is being defined in the community. They appear to be active managers, not passive recipients of societal attitudes, and, furthermore, functional members of the community. By forgoing exemption from social roles carried by their significant impairment, mental patients continue to be contributing members of their host families, and in some cases develop into caregivers themselves completing the circle of role reversal.

Research limitations

The current analysis utilizes secondary data and therefore is restricted by the information included in the primary research.

Originality/value

The findings allow us to develop a deeper understanding of the social status chronic mental patients acquire in the community, and how it is influenced by the dynamics of social stigmatization and remedial work these social actors are compelled to perform. Additionally, the study contributes to the inclusion of the chronic patients’ perspective in research.

Details

50 Years After Deinstitutionalization: Mental Illness in Contemporary Communities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-403-4

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Melissa Jane Welch

The purpose of this paper is to unpack the tenuous relationship between medical sociology and disability studies, particularly as it relates to the work of Irving Zola.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to unpack the tenuous relationship between medical sociology and disability studies, particularly as it relates to the work of Irving Zola.

Findings

Many attribute the division between these disciplines to their starkly different and oft competing approaches to disability; however, I argue that a closer examination reveals a number of commonalities between the two.

Implications

I use Irving K. Zola’s extensive body of scholarship to demonstrate the connections between these divergent approaches to disability, and imagine what his legacy has to offer to the advancement of a diverse sociology of disability.

Value

Neither focus is more correct than the other, as considering these bodies of work together presents a number of opportunities to advance a more comprehensive sociological theory – not just of disability – but of ableism and its intersections with other forms of oppression as well.

Details

Sociology Looking at Disability: What Did We Know and When Did We Know it
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-478-5

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Book part
Publication date: 31 October 2014

Alexander I. Stingl

An inquiry into the constitution of the experience of patienthood. It understands “becoming a patient” as a production of a subjectivity, in other words as a process of…

Abstract

Purpose

An inquiry into the constitution of the experience of patienthood. It understands “becoming a patient” as a production of a subjectivity, in other words as a process of individuation and milieu that occurs through an ontology of production. This ontology of production can, of course, also be understood as a political ontology. Therefore, this is, first of all, an inquiry into a mode of production, and, secondly, an inquiry into its relation to the issue of social justice – because of effects of digital divisions. In these terms, it also reflects on how expert discourses, such as in medical sociology and science studies (STS), can (and do) articulate their problems.

Approach

An integrative mode of discourse analysis, strongly related to discursive institutionalism, called semantic agency theory: it considers those arrangements (institutions, informal organizations, networks, collectivities, etc.) and assemblages (intellectual equipment, vernacular epistemologies, etc.) that are constitutive of how the issue of “patient experience” can be articulated form its position within an ontology of production.

Findings

The aim not being the production of a finite result, what is needed is a shift in how “the construction of patient experience” is produced by expert discourses. While the inquiry is not primarily an empirical study and is also limited to “Western societies,” it emphasizes that there is a relation between political ontologies (including the issues of social justice) and the subjectivities that shape the experiences of people in contemporary health care systems, and, finally, that this relation is troubled by the effects of the digital divide(s).

Originality

A proposal “to interrogate and trouble” some innovative extensions and revisions – even though it will not be able to speculate about matters of degree – to contemporary theories of biomedicalization, patienthood, and managed care.

Details

Mediations of Social Life in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-222-7

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Abstract

Details

Sociology Looking at Disability: What Did We Know and When Did We Know it
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-478-5

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Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2020

John Scott

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Guide to Talcott Parsons
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-654-2

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Hannah Snyder, Lars Witell, Mattias Elg and Janet R. McColl-Kennedy

When using a service, customers often develop their own solutions by integrating resources to solve problems and co-create value. Drawing on innovation and creativity…

Abstract

Purpose

When using a service, customers often develop their own solutions by integrating resources to solve problems and co-create value. Drawing on innovation and creativity literature, this paper aims to investigate the influence of place (the service setting and the customer setting) on customer creativity in a health-care context.

Design/methodology/approach

In a field study using customer diaries, 200 ideas from orthopedic surgery patients were collected and evaluated by an expert panel using the consensual assessment technique (CAT).

Findings

Results suggest that place influences customer creativity. In the customer setting, customers generate novel ideas that may improve their clinical health. In the service setting, customers generate ideas that may improve the user value of the service and enhance the customer experience. Customer creativity is influenced by the role the customer adopts in a specific place. In the customer setting customers were more likely to develop ideas involving active customer roles. Interestingly, while health-care customers provided ideas in both settings, contrary to expectation, ideas scored higher on user value in the service setting than in the customer setting.

Research limitations/implications

This study shows that customer creativity differs in terms of originality, user value and clinical value depending on the place (service setting or customer setting), albeit in one country in a standardized care process.

Practical implications

The present research puts customer creativity in relation to health-care practices building on an active patient role, suggesting that patients can contribute to the further development of health-care services.

Originality/value

As the first field study to test the influence of place on customer creativity, this research makes a novel contribution to the growing body of work in customer creativity, showing that different places are more/less favorable for different dimensions of creativity. It also relates customer creativity to health-care practices and highlights that patients are an untapped source of creativity with first-hand knowledge and insights, importantly demonstrating how customers can contribute to the further development of health-care services.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Danielle Bessett

Popular self-help pregnancy literature suggests a “generational disconnect” between pregnant women and their mothers, emphasizing the incommensurate experiences of the two…

Abstract

Popular self-help pregnancy literature suggests a “generational disconnect” between pregnant women and their mothers, emphasizing the incommensurate experiences of the two generations. Based on longitudinal, in-depth interviews with a diverse group of 64 pregnant women and 23 grandmothers-to-be, this chapter explores how different generations of women negotiate the idea of a disconnect and its implications for the medicalization of pregnancy. My findings showed limited support for the generational disconnect. Nearly all of the pregnant women I interviewed who were in contact with their mothers consulted them to assess issues related to pregnancy embodiment. Black and Latina women and white women with less than a college degree disregarded or even rejected the disconnect; they tended to frame their mothers’ advice as relevant. Their mothers attended prenatal care appointments and frequently expressed skepticism about medical directives. By contrast, I found that highly educated white women tended to endorse the generational disconnect when it came to matters related to pregnancy health behaviors – what to eat, how much to exercise – and their obstetric care. The mothers of these women not only largely supported the generational disconnect, but also bonded with their daughter over a shared appreciation for scientific understandings of pregnancy. Foregrounding women’s perspectives provides insights into meaning-making in pregnancy and the ways that mothers of pregnant women can both stymie and deepen medicalization of childbearing.

Details

Reproduction, Health, and Medicine
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-172-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Roger Butterworth and Jo Dean

The Avon & Western Wiltshire NHS Trust's Work Development Programme in Bristol is a Beacon award winner. This Department of Health award has been made for achievements in…

Abstract

The Avon & Western Wiltshire NHS Trust's Work Development Programme in Bristol is a Beacon award winner. This Department of Health award has been made for achievements in establishing a comprehensive vocational advice and support service for people with mental health difficulties ‐ starting from inside specialist mental health services. The funding attached is to enable the model and good practice to be shared more widely in the NHS. Central to the service model are close partnerships with occupational therapy as well as the employment service, further education and service providers from the voluntary sector. Roger Butterworth (who started it) and Jo Dean describe how the service was developed.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Book part
Publication date: 16 October 2014

Larry R. Hearld, Kristine R. Hearld and Tory H. Hogan

Longitudinally (2008–2012) assess whether community-level sociodemographic characteristics were associated with patient-centered medical home (PCMH) capacity among primary…

Abstract

Purpose

Longitudinally (2008–2012) assess whether community-level sociodemographic characteristics were associated with patient-centered medical home (PCMH) capacity among primary care and specialty physician practices, and the extent to which variation in PCMH capacity can be accounted for by sociodemographic characteristics of the community.

Design/methodology/approach

Linear growth curve models among 523 small and medium-sized physician practices that were members of a consortium of physician organizations pursuing the PCMH.

Findings

Our analysis indicated that the average level of sociodemographic characteristics was typically not associated with the level of PCMH capacity, but the heterogeneity of the surrounding community is generally associated with lower levels of capacity. Furthermore, these relationships differed for interpersonal and technical dimensions of the PCMH.

Implications

Our findings suggest that PCMH capabilities may not be evenly distributed across communities and raise questions about whether such distributional differences influence the PCMH’s ability to improve population health, especially the health of vulnerable populations. Such nuances highlight the challenges faced by practitioners and policy makers who advocate the continued expansion of the PCMH as a means of improving the health of local communities.

Originality/value

To date, most studies have focused cross-sectionally on practice characteristics and their association with PCMH adoption. Less understood is how physician practices’ PCMH adoption varies as a function of the sociodemographic characteristics of the community in which the practice is located, despite work that acknowledges the importance of social context in decisions about adoption and implementation that can affect the dissemination of innovations.

Details

Population Health Management in Health Care Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-197-8

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