Search results

1 – 10 of 10
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sibylle Heilbrunn

In an extreme and intentional institutional void, African refugees in Israel are bricoleuring by building an entrepreneurship market next to an “open” detention camp. The…

Abstract

Purpose

In an extreme and intentional institutional void, African refugees in Israel are bricoleuring by building an entrepreneurship market next to an “open” detention camp. The purpose of this paper is to analyze how refugee entrepreneurs overcome institutional voids through bricolage in an illegal marketplace outside the detention camp.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to deal with the question of why and how people act entrepreneurial under extreme circumstances, the interpretive/social constructionist paradigm is applied in form of the multiple stories milieu case study pattern. Data were gathered via official reports, interviews and observations.

Findings

Outside the detention camp it is via bricolage that entrepreneurs address the economic detour in the intentional institutional void. At a place which is meant to make asylum seekers leave Israel by coining them “infiltrators” and by “making their lives miserable,” bricoleurs attend their own and the needs of fellow detainees providing goods and service and community space.

Originality/value

By contextualizing entrepreneurial practices, the paper contributes to the understanding of refugee entrepreneurship by demonstrating how refugees – within the pressure and constraints of context – initiate entrepreneurial activities. Theoretically the paper extends knowledge of minority entrepreneurs who are acting as bricoleurs, explaining how their entrepreneuring can be a kind of space creation process.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yariv Itzkovich, Sibylle Heilbrunn and Ana Aleksic

The full-range leadership theory, and the distinction between transformational, transactional and laissez-faire leadership behaviour has strongly influenced leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

The full-range leadership theory, and the distinction between transformational, transactional and laissez-faire leadership behaviour has strongly influenced leadership theory and research in the last several decades. However, in spite of its impact on theory and practice, it has a few shortcomings, as, in its essence, it disregards several essential aspects of a leader’s behaviour, such as the dark side of leadership behaviour. Therefore, to capture various leader behaviours, we provide a more comprehensive leadership model named the “complete full range of leadership”.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on reviewing the relevant theoretical and empirical literature, we propose an extended theoretical model, which addresses the existing shortcomings of the full range leadership model.

Findings

First, we added a new active and more destructive facet of leadership style named active, destructive leadership style. Second, based on existing empirical findings, we restructured the transactional facet of full-range leadership by collapsing its components into two new distinct facets representing active constructive leadership style and passive destructive leadership style. Finally, drawing on Hersey and Blanchard’s model, we add a new passive and constructive facet named passive constructive leadership.

Originality/value

Our suggested “complete full range of leadership” contributes to leadership theory by addressing the gap between existing theory and empirical findings, making a clear distinction between lack of leadership and delegation and by comprising the dark side of leadership with its bright side into one comprehensive leadership model.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 39 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sibylle Heilbrunn

The purpose of this paper is to investigate entrepreneurial opportunities in changing communities via the development of a conceptual model, drawing on Hudson's concepts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate entrepreneurial opportunities in changing communities via the development of a conceptual model, drawing on Hudson's concepts of places and spaces. It also aims to explore the scope and variety of entrepreneurial opportunities in Kibbutzim located within a conceptual model of four clusters based on availability of economic and social capital.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample for this study consists of 81 Kibbutzim representing 29 per cent of the Kibbutz population (277 Kibbutzim). Data were collected via official sources of the kibbutz movement and analyzed using Anova models comparing groups.

Findings

The findings reveal that both scope and variety of entrepreneurship vary within the four clusters of kibbutz communities and point to a positive influence of availability of economic and social community capital on entrepreneurial opportunities.

Originality/value

The paper presents the development of a conceptual model more sensitive to the heterogeneity of kibbutz communities than former dichotomous categorizations.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sibylle Heilbrunn

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors influencing entrepreneurial intensity. More specifically the study addresses the following objectives: propose a way to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the factors influencing entrepreneurial intensity. More specifically the study addresses the following objectives: propose a way to measure entrepreneurial intensity within the community context in order to determine entrepreneurial activity over a period of ten years, detect the factors influencing the entrepreneurial intensity, and finally locate Kibbutz communities on the entrepreneurial grid.

Design/methodology/approach

Kibbutz communities are the level of analysis. Using a comprehensive questionnaire, a sample of 60 Kibbutzim – constituting 22 percent of the population of Kibbutz communities in Israel – was investigated over a period of ten years. The same questionnaire was administered to the same sample Kibbutzim (Kibbutzim is the plural of Kibbutz) in 1994, 1997 and 2004. Collected data include number and types of enterprises, economic strength, organizational size and age, and features of organizational structure and culture.

Findings

Quantitative data analysis revealed a significant increase of entrepreneurial activity of Kibbutz communities in terms of frequency, degree and intensity of entrepreneurship. Organizational size and age have an impact on entrepreneurial intensity as well as the existence of an “entrepreneurial vehicle.” On the entrepreneurial grid Kibbutzim are moving from the incremental/periodic cluster towards the dynamic cluster, but few meaningful breakthroughs can be observed.

Research limitations/implications

More research is needed in order to understand the interrelationship between community environments and entrepreneurship. The major research limitation of this paper constitutes the fact that only Kibbutz communities were investigated.

Originality/value

The paper utilizes the concept of the entrepreneurial grid for an empirical analysis of community entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sibylle Heilbrunn, Khaled Abu-Asbeh and Muhammed Abu Nasra

The purpose of this article is to explore the difficulties facing entrepreneurs in three groups of women in Israel: immigrant women from the Former Soviet Union (FSU)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the difficulties facing entrepreneurs in three groups of women in Israel: immigrant women from the Former Soviet Union (FSU), women belonging to the Palestinian Israeli minority and Jewish Israeli women belonging to the majority population. Relying on the stratification approach, the authors investigate the extent to which labor market, resource and women-specific disadvantages constrain women's entrepreneurship within these three groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The target research population consisted of 477 women entrepreneurs who operated businesses between 2009 and 2010. Using systematic sampling, the authors surveyed 148 FSU immigrant women business owners, 150 Jewish Israeli women business owners and 170 Palestinian Israeli women business owners, using a comprehensive questionnaire administered in the entrepreneurs' native language.

Findings

The authors found similarities and differences between the three groups as to their ability to handle difficulties deriving from labor market, resource and women-specific disadvantages. Overall, the authors found that Palestinian women entrepreneurs have relatively more difficulties than the other two groups.

Research limitations/implications

Women entrepreneurs' socio-political status within stratified social realities imposes constraints on their economic activities. Further research should investigate policies, which could assist in overcoming these constraints taking into consideration similarities and differences between specific groups.

Originality/value

In addition to shedding light on the impact of socio-political environmental circumstances on women entrepreneurs in a particular country, the authors believe that applying the social stratification approach is especially valuable at the intersection of minority status, gender and entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sibylle Heilbrunn and Nonna Kushnirovich

The purpose of this paper is to examine governmental support to immigrant entrepreneurs and its impact on their businesses. The study seeks to explore the needs of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine governmental support to immigrant entrepreneurs and its impact on their businesses. The study seeks to explore the needs of immigrant entrepreneurs as to government support schemes, and the impact of government policy upon mobilization of resources and growth of immigrant businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

Combining convenient and snowball sample, 218 former Soviet Union immigrant entrepreneurs from all over Israel and all business spheres were surveyed via a questionnaire. Data analysis was conducted by quantitative statistical methods.

Findings

Entrepreneurs who encountered more problems at business start‐up are more likely to receive government support. Receiving support facilitates mobilizing resources and compensates for fewer opportunities of initially weak businesses.

Research limitations/implications

Further research might focus upon comparing the impact of policy on immigrant entrepreneurs between countries. Utilization of the findings by policy makers may improve the impact of policy and help to focus the allocation of resources more efficiently.

Originality/value

The paper provides valuable insight for academics and practitioners who are interested to foster immigrant entrepreneurship as mechanism of economic integration.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Khaled Mohammed Abu‐Asbah and Sibylle Heilbrunn

Drawing upon the disadvantage theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate patterns of entrepreneurship evolving under conditions of double discrimination…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the disadvantage theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate patterns of entrepreneurship evolving under conditions of double discrimination characterizing the situation of Arab women entrepreneurs in Israel.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive questionnaire was administered in 2006 to a sample of 405 Arab‐Muslim women entrepreneurs in the northern and southern “triangle” of Israel. The authors used a snowball convenient method, contacting business women in the “triangle” area by word of mouth. Based on data provided by the Center of Fostering Entrepreneurship (in Hebrew “MATI”) in Bakka el Garbia, it was assumed that about 80 percent of all Arab women business owners in this particular area had been reached.

Findings

In line with the literature, it was found that under conditions of double discrimination a rather traditional type of entrepreneurship evolves, but the authors' findings do not confirm that these businesses are necessarily marginal and illegal. Instead the authors found a variety of types; the majority of which the authors would call community‐based traditional micro‐enterprises.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the understanding of entrepreneurial patterns emerging under conditions of discrimination. It is believed to be one of the very first studies directly investigating a large group of Arab women entrepreneurs in Israel; therefore the understanding of the personal and business characteristics of these women is of major importance.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Sibylle Heilbrunn

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organizational change upon entrepreneurship in communities such as the Israeli kibbutz, which underwent during…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of organizational change upon entrepreneurship in communities such as the Israeli kibbutz, which underwent during the last two decades a process of crisis and change. Based on a theoretical model that identifies how cultural orientations of individualism versus collectivism affect the entrepreneurial process, attempt is made to analyze whether and how the move from organizational collectivism towards organizational individualism influences the volume and type of entrepreneurship in community settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive questionnaire has been administered to a sample of 60 kibbutzim in 1997 and in 2004. The questionnaire includes issues of organizational culture, structure and business orientation, as well as reports on the ventures initiated during the relevant years. The data received by means of the questionnaire are analyzed by quantitative statistical methods. In‐depth interviews with office holders in a small number of kibbutzim add understanding of the underlying ongoing processes of change.

Findings

The results of the study show that after processes of organizational change, resource leverage is still characterized by induced strategic behavior, but venture policy is no longer one of nurturing. Market criteria such as profitability and competition at the organizational level promote individualistic‐oriented motivation and economic behavior of entrepreneurs within the community setting.

Research limitations/implications

Using a model of corporate entrepreneurship is the inherent limitation of the design of this study. Future research should consider alternative theoretical models for the analysis of entrepreneurship in community settings, focusing on independent variables such as human and social capital of the community entrepreneur.

Originality/value

The paper provides an investigation into the influence of organizational change upon the volume of entrepreneurship in a community setting.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Nonna Kushnirovich and Sibylle Heilbrunn

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for analyzing preference for innovation of different groups of hi‐tech workers according to their culture of origin and gender.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework for analyzing preference for innovation of different groups of hi‐tech workers according to their culture of origin and gender.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey was conducted online among veteran Israelis, immigrants from North America, Western countries and immigrants from the Former Soviet Union employed in 60 different high‐tech organizations.

Findings

The paper developed the application of Bourdieu's concept of habitus, adopting it to migration research and to understanding preference of changes and innovativeness. The authors also developed a framework for analyzing the preference of innovation according to workers’ gender and culture of origin. Based on the Entrepreneurial Drive Theory regarding preference for innovation and nonconformity of Florin et al., the authors determined four dimensions characterizing innovativeness.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study was the relatively small number of participants interviewed. The paper focused on only two ethnic immigrant groups.

Originality/value

The study should contribute to migration research, but also to social research on innovation. It can help understand what (and how) shapes innovativeness, both in the migratory processes and among the native population of the host country. Such understanding can contribute to encourage innovativeness resulting in economic development.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article

Harry Matlay

Abstract

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

1 – 10 of 10