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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Aki Sugano, Mika Ohta, Tsuyoshi Oda, Kenji Miura, Shuji Goto, Masako Matsuura, Eiichi Maeda, Toshiko Ohshima, Yuji Matsumoto and Yutaka Takaoka

The authors develop a program, named eBraille, to translate Japanese text into braille and thereby generate braille documents easily. Public access to this program is…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors develop a program, named eBraille, to translate Japanese text into braille and thereby generate braille documents easily. Public access to this program is provided to anyone via the Internet. The paper aims to evaluate the translation accuracy of the eBraille program.

Design/methodology/approach

eBraille is a CGI program that is accessible via a web browser. The core of the program is a braille translating engine called the Kobe University Intelligent Braille Engine for ChaSen (KUIC). It is based on Japanese Braille Transcription Rules (Japanese Braille Committee, 2001). To evaluate the translation accuracy of eBraille, a corpus was utilized that was created from ordinary text and braille newspaper articles.

Findings

The paper finds that eBraille translation accuracy is equivalent to or better than that of other stand‐alone braille translation programs. This result suggests that the program achieved the goal of being applicable for practical use. In addition, the program is utilized to make Kobe University Hospital brochures in braille for outpatients and inpatients. The brochures are available in the hospital and are favorably accepted by the blind and the visually impaired. This result suggests that the translation program can facilitate accessibility to information for patients.

Originality/value

The braille translation program is based on a client‐server system and is architecture‐independent. Moreover, it is a free system for creating braille text files for anyone who has access to a web browser.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1981

Anne J. Walton

The examination and identification of solvents and binder resins in particular has been discussed in detail previously. It is the sole purpose of this section to indicate…

Abstract

The examination and identification of solvents and binder resins in particular has been discussed in detail previously. It is the sole purpose of this section to indicate the means available for obtaining these substances from finished paints in such a way as to facilitate their analysis. For example, the ASTM (15) has published a standard procedure for examining the solvent portion of paints by direct injection on to a GC. In this case, so as to prevent blockage of the column by the resin and pigment components, the sample was injected either via a glass injection port sleeve or on to a glass wool plug positioned in the heated injection port. Hence solvent analysis could be carried out without the need to apply any preliminary separation procedures. If however, both solvent and binder resin are to be examined then a procedure for separating these constituents must be applied.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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