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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Nitya Prasad Singh and Shubham Singh

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms can develop business risk resilience from supply chain disruption events, by developing big data analytics (BDA…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how firms can develop business risk resilience from supply chain disruption events, by developing big data analytics (BDA) capabilities within their organization. The authors test whether BDA mediates the impact of institutional response to supply chain disruption events, and information technology infrastructure capabilities (ITICs), on firm’s ability to develop risk resilience from supply chain disruption events.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on survey data collected from 225 firms, spread across several sectors in the USA and Europe. The respondents are primarily senior and middle management professionals who have experience within the information technology (IT) and supply chain domain. Validity and reliability analyses were performed using SPSS and AMOS; and covariance-based structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesis.

Findings

The analysis reveals two significant findings. First, the authors observe that institutional experience with managing supply chain disruption events has a negative impact on firm’s ability to develop business risk resilience. However, if the organizations adopt BDA capabilities, it enables them to effectively utilize resident firm knowledge and develop supply chain risk resilience capacity. The results further suggest that BDA positively adds to an organization’s existing IT capabilities. The analysis shows that BDA mediates the impact of ITIC on the organization’s ability to develop risk resilience to supply chain disruption events.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few works that empirically validate the important role that BDA capabilities play in enabling firms develop business risk resilience from supply chain disruption events. The study further provides a counterpoint to the existing perspective within the supply chain risk management literature that institutional experience of managing past supply chain disruption events prepares the organization to deal with future disruption events. This paper adds to our understanding of how, by adopting BDA capabilities, firms can develop supply chain risk resilience from disruption events.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Shubham Singh and Shashank Mittal

Differences in institutional environment and governance structures pave the way for heterogeneous nature of different businesses; this, in turn, shapes the way various…

Abstract

Purpose

Differences in institutional environment and governance structures pave the way for heterogeneous nature of different businesses; this, in turn, shapes the way various sections of society act toward each other enacting their responsibilities. Taking into account the unique institutional environment and governance structures of firms in developing economies, this paper aims to build on the “stakeholder theory” to address the issue of the implementation of corporate social responsibilities (CSR) practices in these economies, particularly India. This paper also aims to uncover the saliency (legitimacy and power) of different stakeholder groups on different aspects of a firm’s CSR activities. Further, as most of the firms in developing economies are family-run firms, the paper examines role of organizational leadership in shaping firms’ CSR strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating literature on “stakeholder theory” and CSR, this paper examines the implementation of different CSR practices by family-run firms in India. This paper uses survey research to collect data from 80 privately held family firms operating in apparel and textiles industry in India. The data have been collected from respondents holding top leadership positions in the sample firms.

Findings

The findings indicate that pressure from primary stakeholders (i.e. customers, employees and shareholders) and CSR-oriented leadership belief significantly influence organizational implementation of CSR practices, whereas pressure from secondary stakeholder (i.e. community groups and non-governmental organizations) was found to be insignificant. Further, CSR-oriented leadership belief moderated the relationship between primary stakeholder pressure and organizational implementation of CSR practices. The findings equally highlighted lower saliency of secondary stakeholder’s legitimacy and power because of weak institutional mechanisms, while on the other hand, the primary stakeholders exert considerable power because of the direct nature of transactional legitimacy, further accentuated by the governance structure in family firms.

Originality/value

This paper is among the very few studies that address the issue of CSR among family-run businesses in developing economies. Existing frameworks on analyzing firm’s implementation of CSR practices does not recognize the inherent heterogeneity among different stakeholder groups. Recognizing that different stakeholders have different levels of influence over firms, this paper categorized the stakeholders’ groups into primary and secondary to analyze their differential impact over firms. Additionally, given the critical role of leadership belief in the implementation of CSR practices, this paper analyzed the moderated effect of CSR-oriented leadership belief toward developing a more robust model of CSR implementation.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 24 May 2018

Shubham, Shashank Mittal and Atri Sengupta

Organizational behavior, Organizational leadership, Organizational transformation.

Abstract

Subject area

Organizational behavior, Organizational leadership, Organizational transformation.

Study level/applicability

First year management students in the course Organizational Behavior (OB). Final year management students in the elective course on leadership and change management. Middle level managers who are working in industry, in the management development program related to change leadership and change management.

Case overview

This case deals with the transformation of the public distribution system (PDS) under the leadership of Dr Raman Singh. The PDS system was an inefficient system and the food grain supply intended for the poor was diverted by intermediaries before reaching the intended beneficiaries. Having experiences in central government ministries as a cabinet minister, Dr Raman Singh decided to transform the PDS. The challenges faced were primarily from that of the reticent bureaucracy and dealing with them requires patience and the skills of a transformational and motivational leader which Dr Raman Singh possessed.

Expected learning outcomes

This case intends to develop understanding of various dimensions related to transformational and motivational styles of leadership. Further, it intends to develop understanding of crucial institutional and organizational changes and how leaders bring about these changes in sync with technological and process changes.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS: 6: Human Resource Management.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 June 2022

Jagvinder Singh, Shubham Singhania and Deepti Aggrawal

This study aims to evaluate the impact of gender diversity on corporate boards on firms’ financial performance in the context of the Indian information and technology (IT…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to evaluate the impact of gender diversity on corporate boards on firms’ financial performance in the context of the Indian information and technology (IT) sector. The Companies Act 2013 brought forth mandatory provisions for the appointment of women directors for a certain class of companies. This study explores the case of board gender diversity in the Indian IT sector’s unique setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a fixed effect panel data regression model to achieve its objectives. Two widely used diversity measures, Blau Index and Shannon Index, have been used to enhance the robustness of the results.

Findings

The results of the study indicate an insignificant relationship between gender diversity and firms’ financial performance. Even the diversity indices portray insignificant results confirming the outcomes of the study. The study indicates that IT sector firms have not been able to leverage the benefits of board gender diversity.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study have important policy implications for the government, regulatory bodies and corporates. The outcomes point out that the benefits that could have accrued based on the diversity aspect could not be harnessed, as the women’s representation on corporate boards is extremely low. Policymakers and government shall focus on devising stringent laws so that better representation of women directors can be used for the interests of the firms.

Originality/value

The study is an attempt to fill the gap in the extant literature which has a scarce number of studies conducted in the unique setting of the IT sector (both in developed and developing economies). To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on the influence of board gender diversity in the IT sector of a developing economy, backed by socio-cultural reasons.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2021

Shubham Dixit, Shiwangi Singh, Sanjay Dhir and Swati Dhir

This study aims to identify the antecedents of strategic thinking and its relationship with competitive advantage. Further, this study analyses the mediating effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the antecedents of strategic thinking and its relationship with competitive advantage. Further, this study analyses the mediating effect of strategic thinking between its antecedents and competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-reported questionnaire with 51 questions was floated among 220 professionals from various industries in India. The response was analysed using the partial least squares-structural equation modelling methodology using SmartPLS software.

Findings

The direct effect of creativity, corporate culture and knowledge management are established with strategic thinking, as well as a competitive advantage. Also, the study finds a significant relationship between strategic thinking and competitive advantage. The study finds no mediation (direct effect) in the case of creativity, corporate culture and knowledge management. Further, no mediation (no relationship) is found in the case of vision.

Practical implications

Business must start adopting strategic thinking practices in their decision-making process to create a competitive advantage. Further, the influence of corporate culture, creativity and knowledge management on strategic thinking highlights their importance.

Originality/value

The study establishes the impact of antecedents of strategic thinking on competitive advantage. The study highlights the importance of other factors along with strategic thinking for achieving competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Shubham Raj, Sher Mohammad, Rima Das and Shreya Saha

This study aims to investigate the optimum proportion of coconut fibre and cement suitable for rammed earth wall construction. Coconut fibres and cement can be easily…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the optimum proportion of coconut fibre and cement suitable for rammed earth wall construction. Coconut fibres and cement can be easily incorporated into the soil mixture which adds strength and durability to the wall. This paper highlights the salient observations from a systematic investigation on the effect of coconut fibre on the performance of stabilized rammed earth blocks.

Design/methodology/approach

Stabilization of soil was done by adding Ordinary Portland Cement (2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 per cent by weight of soil), whereas coconut fibre in length about 15 mm was added (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1.0 per cent by weight of soil) as reinforcement. Thirty types of mixes were created by adding different proportions of cement and fibre to locally available soil and compacting the mix at constant compaction energy in three layers with Proctor rammer.

Findings

Samples were tested for compressive strength and tensile strength, and failure patterns were analysed. The use of cement and fibre increases ultimate strengths significantly up to an optimum limit of 0.8 per cent fibre content, provides a secondary benefit of keeping material bound together after failure and increases residual strength. Benefits of fibre reinforcement includes both improved ductility in comparison with raw blocks and inhibition of crack propagation after its initial formation.

Originality/value

After analysing the results, it is recommended to use 0.8 per cent fibre and 5-10 per cent cement by weight of soil to achieve considerable strength. This research may add a value in the areas of green and sustainable housing, waste utilization, etc.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Yanen Wang, Ray Tahir Mushtaq, Ammar Ahmed, Ammar Ahmed, Mudassar Rehman, Mudassar Rehman, Aqib Mashood Khan, Shubham Sharma, Dr Kashif Ishfaq, Haider Ali and Thierno Gueye

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology has a huge influence on the real world because of its ability to manufacture massively complicated geometrics. The purpose of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Additive manufacturing (AM) technology has a huge influence on the real world because of its ability to manufacture massively complicated geometrics. The purpose of this study is to use CiteSpace (CS) visual analysis to identify fused deposition modeling (FDM) research and development patterns to guide researchers to decide future research and provide a framework for corporations and organizations to prepare for the development in the rapid prototyping industry. Three-dimensional printing (3DP) is defined to budget minimize manufactured input and output for aviation and the medical product industrial sectors. 3DP has implemented its potential in the Coronavirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) reaction.

Design/methodology/approach

First, 396 original publications were extracted from the web of science (WOS) with the comprehensive list and did scientometrics analysis in CS software. The parameters are specified in CS including the span (from 2011 to 2019, one year slice for the co-authorship and the co-accordance analysis), visualization (show the merged networks), specific criteria for selection (top 20%), node form (author, organization, region, reference cited; cited author, journal and keywords) and pruning (pathfinder and slicing network). Finally, correlating data was studied and showed the results of the visualization study of FDM research were shown.

Findings

The framework of FDM information is beginning to take shape. About hot research topics, there are “Morphology,” “Tensile Property by making Blends,” “Use of Carbon nanotube in 3DP” and “Topology optimization.” Regarding the latest research frontiers of FDM printing, there are “Fused Filament Fabrication,” “AM,” in FDM printing. Where “Post-processing” and “environmental impact” are the research hotspots in FDM printing. These research results can provide insight into FDM printing and useful information to consider the existing studies and developments in FDM researchers’ analysis.

Research limitations/implications

Despite some important obtained results through FDM-related publications’ visualization, some deficiencies remain in this research. With >99% of articles written in English, the input data for CS was all downloaded from WOS databases, resulting in a language bias of papers in other languages and neglecting other data sources. Although, there are several challenges being faced by the FDM that limit its wide variety of applications. However, the significance of the current work concerning the technical and engineering prospects is discussed herein.

Originality/value

First, the novelty of this work lies in describing the FDM approach in a Scientometric way. In Scientometric investigation, leading writers, organizations, keywords, hot research and emerging knowledge points were explained. Second, this research has thoroughly and comprehensively examined the useful sustainability effects, i.e. economic sustainability, energy-based sustainability, environmental sustainability, of 3DP in industrial development in qualitative and quantitative aspects by 2025 from a global viewpoint. Third, this work also described the practical significance of FDM based on 3DP since COVID-19. 3DP has stepped up as a vital technology to support improved healthcare and other general response to emergency situations.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Abstract

Details

Big Data Analytics and Intelligence: A Perspective for Health Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-099-8

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Shubham Tripathi and Manish Gupta

The article analyses the current readiness of India to transform its supply chain ecosystem to smarter systems with Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Abstract

Purpose

The article analyses the current readiness of India to transform its supply chain ecosystem to smarter systems with Fourth Industrial Revolution.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is carried out in two stages. First, the readiness of India is assessed globally, and then the rate of transformation over the years and supporting policies are analyzed to understand the transformation potential. This analysis is done across nine identified macro factors namely government support, regulations, business environment, human resource, infrastructure, innovation capability, technological advancements, cybersecurity and digital awareness. The study combines empirical data from 2010 onwards with the strategic literature published by government bodies and institutions for analysis.

Findings

Results show that India's readiness is just above the global average with a score of 0.44 on a scale of 0–1 (most ready). Government and start-up culture are found to be leading transformation factors, while digital infrastructure, regulations and cybersecurity are most lacking areas.

Originality/value

This study is first of its kind to the best of our knowledge. The academic literature has not reported studies assessing Industry 4.0 readiness of supply chain ecosystem using macro factors for nations.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2015

Shubham Mehta

Acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPD), introduced in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) diagnostic system in 1992, are not receiving much…

Abstract

Acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPD), introduced in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) diagnostic system in 1992, are not receiving much attention in developing countries. Therefore, the main objective of this article is to review the literature related to the diagnostic stability of ATPD in developing countries. A PubMed search was conducted to review the studies concerned with this issue in the context of developing countries, as diagnostic stability is more of a direct test of validity of psychiatric diagnoses. Four publications were found. According to the literature search, the stability percentage of the ICD-10 ATPD diagnosis is 63-100%. The diagnostic shift is more commonly either towards bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, if any. Shorter duration of illness (<1 month) and abrupt onset (<48 hours) predict a stable diagnosis of ATPD. Based on available evidence, the diagnosis of ATPD appears to be relatively stable in developing countries. However, it is difficult to make a definitive conclusion, as there is a substantial lack of literature in developing country settings.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

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