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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Vipul Pare and Naser Pourazad

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which Indian consumers of different demographic groups vary in terms of shopping mall visits (frequency of visit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which Indian consumers of different demographic groups vary in terms of shopping mall visits (frequency of visit, hours spent in the mall, and number of shops visited) and purchase behaviour (total money spent, number of shops purchased from and number of items purchased).

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a self-administered survey of 400 Indian mall shoppers to examine Indian shoppers’ behaviour with respect to visiting and buying behaviour. Descriptive analyses and χ2 tests were conducted to identify patterns and capture the significant relationships in shopping behaviour across different demographic segments.

Findings

The results show that shoppers of different age cohorts and from different household sizes behave differently from one another in a significant manner. In terms of gender, however, men and women tend to behave in a similar manner in terms of visit frequency, time and money spent per visit. The study also provides insight into where the differences occur and between which specific groups.

Research limitations/implications

Data comes from one major city of India which limits the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

For mall managers and retailers, the study findings indicate that the stores that serve recreational needs should focus more on younger segments, where men and women share similar buying patterns. Findings from this study could also be used for segmentation exercises and to build strategies to convert footfall into actual purchase, especially within the rapidly growing Indian mall market.

Originality/value

The study adds value to the body of retail literature and provides empirical evidence from the rapidly developing Indian market. The study also provides insight into where differences occur and between which specific groups. By highlighting the differences in greater detail, the study benefits retailers in general and specifically, mall managers.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Fang Meng and Yingjiao Xu

This research attempts to expand the understanding of the nature of tourist shopping behavior. More specifically, this study aims to explore the influences of the…

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8048

Abstract

Purpose

This research attempts to expand the understanding of the nature of tourist shopping behavior. More specifically, this study aims to explore the influences of the components of planned behavior, impulsive behavior, and experiential consumption on tourists' intentions to shop/purchase in the tourism context.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual study reviews and investigates the major current research in the areas of planned behavior, impulse purchase, experiential consumption, as well as tourism shopping behavior/experience. By reviewing and assessing important relevant concepts, this study proposes a conceptual framework of tourist shopping behavior.

Findings

Based on the extensive review and discussion of the related literature, this study proposes that tourist shopping intention and actual purchase behavior are influenced by various indicators, including planned behavior, impulsive behavior, and experiential consumption factors. In other words, tourist shopping behavior is a mixture of planned, impulsive, and experiential consumption behavior.

Originality/value

The study of tourism shopping is still limited and in an exploratory stage. The resulting theoretical framework of this study is an inclusive overarching structure systematically explaining the nature of tourist shopping behavior from the perspectives of planned behavior, impulsive buying, and experiential consumption. This study is expected to provide better information and understanding of the factors influencing tourist shopping behavior, which, in turn, will lead to improved planning, marketing and management of sales, expenditures and opportunities in the tourism and retail industries.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Chanaka Jayawardhena

A value‐attitude‐behaviour model was applied to investigate the roles of personal values in e‐shopping consumer behaviour. Structural equation modelling identified that…

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14569

Abstract

A value‐attitude‐behaviour model was applied to investigate the roles of personal values in e‐shopping consumer behaviour. Structural equation modelling identified that personal values (self‐direction values, enjoyment values and self‐achievement values) were significantly related to positive attitudes toward e‐shopping. Individual attitudes toward e‐shopping were a direct predicator of e‐shopping behaviour and mediated the relationship between personal values and behaviour. This hierarchical relationship among personal values, attitudes and behaviour may be exploited by e‐tailers to position e‐shops and provide a persuasive means for e‐shoppers to satisfy their needs.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Patricia Sorce, Victor Perotti and Stanley Widrick

This paper examines the shopping and buying behavior of younger and older online shoppers as mediated by their attitudes toward internet shopping.

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26993

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the shopping and buying behavior of younger and older online shoppers as mediated by their attitudes toward internet shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 300 students and staff from a US university completed a survey regarding their online shopping and buying experiences for 17 products.

Findings

The results show that, while older online shoppers search for significantly fewer products than their younger counterparts, they actually purchase as much as younger consumers. Attitudinal factors explained more variance in online searching behavior. Age explained more variance in purchasing behavior if the consumer had first searched for the product online.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the present research are threefold. First, the sample was restricted to university faculty, staff and students. Second, a better measure of the hedonic motivation construct is needed. Third, additional independent measures such as income should be included to understand the additional demographic factors related to online purchase.

Practical implications

Retailing managers can make use of the results as describing multifaceted nature of online shopping and buying behavior. Age differences (in both directions) were seen for many product categories. In addition, results indicate that how one measures online shopping impacts on one's understanding of age effects on internet shopping. Age was negatively correlated with online pre‐purchase search but was positively correlated with online purchasing when pre‐purchase search behavior was taken into account.

Originality/value

The present study advances knowledge of the nature of the relationships among age, attitudes, and online shopping and buying behavior.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 23 December 2020

Ririn Tri Ratnasari, Ulfa Fadilatul Ula and Raditya Sukmana

This study aims to investigate the effects of religiosity level on the shopping orientation and behavior of Muslim customers and how to store image moderates this relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of religiosity level on the shopping orientation and behavior of Muslim customers and how to store image moderates this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a positive approach and partial least square analysis technique on samples of Muslim customers in major cities in Indonesia, who have purchased products in the Syariah supermarket such as Sakinah Supermarket and 212 supermarkets at least twice within the past three months. The sampling method used in this study is convenience sampling, with a total of 117 respondents.

Findings

The results reveal that religiosity level significantly affects the Muslim customers’ shopping orientation subsequently impacts consumer shopping behavior. The result is in line with the rising trend by a society that begins to define successful businesses that touch upon the spiritual aspects of the shoppers. Customers with higher religiosity prefer higher quality products and customers who have lesser levels of religiosity establish different shopping characteristics and behavior. This eventually forms an orientation in shopping behavior. Furthermore, it is found that the store image significantly strengthens the influence of the impact of shopping orientations on Muslim customers’ behavior.

Practical implications

Marketers can increase the image of Islamic stores by implementing the principle of a smile, greeting, address to every customer who shops, managing the cashier queue to prevent ikhtilath (meeting between men and women) and adding decorations and calligraphy ornaments. Marketers can create membership cards, posters or billboards about the products that are being discounted or promoted to increase customer numbers image enhancement.

Originality/value

This study used specific variables that represent religiosity in the retail sector. It offers an analysis of how Muslim customers’ religiosity can affect their shopping orientation and behavior. The study is conducted in Indonesia, where research on this topic is still limited.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Hayiel Hino

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between switching intention and actual behaviour in the grocery shopping context. In particular, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between switching intention and actual behaviour in the grocery shopping context. In particular, the study examines how switching intention drives customers to either replace the current store or cross to others. In addition, the study examines the role of cross-shopping in total-switching behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs data collected from a sample consisting of 247 food grocery shoppers. The conceptual framework and hypothesis were analysed using the partial least squares approach.

Findings

The empirical results support the author’s claim that the research approach applied in this study better explains the switching intention–actual behaviour relationship. Specifically, the analysis provides strong support for the effect of switching intention and various moderating barriers on both cross-shopping and total-switching behaviour. Additionally, the study results point to the positive relationship between cross-shopping and total-switching, indicating that crossing to competing stores is the first step towards utilising the total-switching behaviour.

Practical implications

Implications for food retail providers are identified, together with a discussion of the study’s limitations and avenues for future research.

Originality/value

The study extends previous research in that it proposed and tested a conceptual framework for investigating the relationship between switching-intention and actual behaviour, claiming that switching intention drives customers to either replace their current store or cross to others, whereas the crossing pattern is a predictor of the total-switching behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Márcia Maurer Herter, Cristiane Pizzutti dos Santos and Diego Costa Pinto

Research suggests that women demonstrate higher levels of shopping satisfaction, recommendation, return intentions, and hedonic shopping than men. However, is it possible…

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5473

Abstract

Purpose

Research suggests that women demonstrate higher levels of shopping satisfaction, recommendation, return intentions, and hedonic shopping than men. However, is it possible to reduce the effects of gender on shopping behaviour? The purpose of this paper is to explore how the interaction between gender and emotions affects consumers’ shopping behaviour outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies show the effects of gender and emotions on shopping behaviour outcomes. Study 1 is a field experiment that tests the effects of gender and emotions (positive vs neutral) on consumer satisfaction, recommendation, and return intentions. Study 2 is a laboratory experiment that explores the effects of gender and emotions (positive, neutral, and negative) on hedonic shopping.

Findings

Results demonstrate that positive (vs neutral) emotions increase shopping behaviour outcomes for men, to reach the same level as for women. The findings also indicate that retail environment perception mediates the effects. Moreover, the results show that positive emotions increase levels of hedonic shopping for men and that negative emotions reduce levels of hedonic shopping for women.

Practical implications

This paper helps retailers enhance shopping behaviour outcomes in retail environments. From a managerial perspective, the findings also provide insights on how to improve shopping behaviour outcomes for male consumers.

Originality/value

This paper shows how to reduce gender effects on consumer shopping behaviour outcomes by activating specific emotions in retail environments. This research also demonstrates the mediating role of retail environment perception.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Anne Wiese, Stephan Zielke and Waldemar Toporowski

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of consumer shopping travel behaviour with a focus on its environmental effects. In particular, the paper aims to…

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3365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis of consumer shopping travel behaviour with a focus on its environmental effects. In particular, the paper aims to contribute a deeper understanding of the drivers of consumer travel behaviour and their interrelations.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, relevant influencing factors of shopping travel behaviour are identified and a theoretical model is deducted. Qualitative interviews were conducted to analyse the model, with interviewees chosen from five life cycles and three residential areas.

Findings

The influencing factors of shopping travel behaviour differ among life cycles. There are two main aspects hindering environmentally friendly behaviour: the perceived necessity of mobility during the various life cycles (by which parents are particularly affected) and the negative evaluation of public transport in terms of flexibility and comfort. The life cycles are linked with a shopper typology, characterizing shopper types by shopping trip planning and the needs the transport modes should address.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical framework and the shopper typology can serve as a basis for future research.

Practical implications

Retailers, transport service providers and policy makers should encourage environmentally friendly travel behaviour (e.g. delivery services offered by retailers would make public transport use more comfortable).

Originality/value

While previous studies have analysed single influencing factors of shopping travel behaviour, we provide a comprehensive theoretical framework, synthesising several influencing factors. A qualitative study based on the model derived analyses interrelations among these factors.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2021

Omar S. Itani and Linda D. Hollebeek

COVID-19 and its precautions, including social distancing, have revolutionized traditional retailing- and consumption patterns. In this turbulent environment, the purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 and its precautions, including social distancing, have revolutionized traditional retailing- and consumption patterns. In this turbulent environment, the purpose of this study is twofold. First, this paper explores the direct effect of consumers’ internal/external health locus-of-control on their hygiene consciousness, which, in turn, affects their social distancing behavior. Second, this study posits that social distancing, in turn, impacts consumers’ current online grocery shopping behavior and their future online grocery shopping intentions, thus uncovering important insight.

Design/methodology/approach

To address these gaps, this paper develops a model that links consumers’ internal/external health locus-of-control to their adoption of e-tailing-based grocery services. Data collected through a web-based survey was analyzed by using partial least squares-based structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers’ health locus-of-control indirectly affects the way they shop for their groceries during the pandemic. In particular, consumers’ internal (external) health locus-of-control drives higher (lower) hygiene consciousness and greater (lower) social distancing behavior. In turn, consumers’ online grocery shopping behavior was found to increase during the pandemic, with their corresponding intent to continue this behavior in the future. Moreover, this study finds the effects of consumers’ social distancing on their current grocery shopping behavior and future intentions to be contingent on consumer age, with stronger effects identified for older consumers.

Originality/value

This study shows how consumers’ internal/external health loci-of-control exert opposing effects on their social distancing behavior, as mediated by hygiene consciousness. Overall, the empirical analyzes corroborate the association of consumers’ social distancing- and online grocery shopping behavior (for consumers of different age profiles), both during and after the pandemic.

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Alexander Rossolov, Olexiy Kuzkin and Halyna Rossolova

The purpose of the paper is to assess the roots of stockpiling behaviors and to give a quantitative assessment of shopping frequency changes for emergency supplies during…

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144

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to assess the roots of stockpiling behaviors and to give a quantitative assessment of shopping frequency changes for emergency supplies during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In addition, the authors aim to determine the sources that influenced emergency supply purchases during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a polling or survey process implementation to collect the data on shopping patterns and to determine the drivers of stockpiling behaviors for the assessment. The polling was conducted using a snowball technique, and descriptive and regression analyses were used to define the roots of the stockpiling behaviors and the shopping frequency changes.

Findings

It was determined that 88.0% of end-consumers increased their shopping volumes for emergency supplies. An almost twofold increase in the average duration of usage for stockpiled goods (from 11 to 21 days) was also determined. Also revealed was a reduction in shopping frequency from an average of seven (pre-COVID-19 period) to five (first wave of COVID-19 pandemic) days. Such disproportional increases in purchase volumes along with a slight reduction in shopping frequency indicate the strong stockpile patterns that occurred during the pandemic.

Originality/value

The research is based on data from Ukraine, where the number of COVID-19 cases was low. Despite the comparatively low spread of COVID-19 in large cities in Ukraine in relation to other cities globally, people still revealed panic and stockpiling behaviors. The study's quantitative assessment of shopping behaviors reveals the social and economic determinants of the shopping frequency.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

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