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Article

Chiu‐chi Angela Chang and Monika Kukar‐Kinney

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast two types of shopping aids, that is, research‐supporting and solution‐oriented shopping aids, and examine their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast two types of shopping aids, that is, research‐supporting and solution‐oriented shopping aids, and examine their effectiveness, considering both consumer and situational factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Expanded selection and additional detailed information are chosen to illustrate research‐supporting shopping aids, and personalized product recommendations and product ratings are used as examples of solution‐oriented shopping aids. This conceptual paper proposes that usage of shopping aids has an effect on the purchase likelihood and decision satisfaction and focuses on studying the moderating role of consumer product knowledge and time pressure. The thesis is that congruence between the type of a shopping aid and consumer characteristics, such as product knowledge, or situational characteristics, such as time pressure, should enhance the effectiveness of shopping aids.

Findings

The research propositions in this paper delineate how the use of retail shopping aids should affect the consumer's purchase likelihood, decision satisfaction, decision confidence, and evaluation costs, under the moderating influence of product knowledge and time pressure. Overall, knowledgeable consumers and less time‐pressed consumers should benefit from research‐supporting shopping aids (i.e. expanded selection and additional product information), whereas novice consumers and time‐pressed consumers should benefit from solution‐oriented shopping aids (i.e. personalized product recommendation and product ratings).

Originality/value

Retail shopping aids are designed to offer sales assistance for consumers to handle the obstacles to purchase completion. However, past efforts to install retail shopping aids have seen mixed results. This conceptual paper advocates that consideration of consumer characteristics and situational factors is necessary to understand the effects of shopping aid usage. This paper thus contributes to the understanding of solutions to purchase decision deferral and the determinants of decision satisfaction, and has practical implications for retailers regarding providing retail shopping aids to facilitate purchase completion and shopping experiences.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article

David A. Kirby

Looks at aspects of government intervention in the provision of social welfare services with regard to marketing. Investigates legislation by the Norwegian government…

Abstract

Looks at aspects of government intervention in the provision of social welfare services with regard to marketing. Investigates legislation by the Norwegian government which has affected the retail sector, and examines its programme of aid to retailers in sparsely‐populated areas. Concludes that the programme is an attempt to recognize the social and economic importance of small shops to the communities they serve and not an attempt to favour the small shop.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Cecilia Díaz-Méndez, Isabel García-Espejo and Sonia Otero-Estévez

The economic crisis has renewed public debate in Europe about food poverty, drawing attention to the insecurity suffered by some social groups that are not apparent in…

Abstract

Purpose

The economic crisis has renewed public debate in Europe about food poverty, drawing attention to the insecurity suffered by some social groups that are not apparent in official surveys. The purpose of this paper is to examine how those affected deal with food poverty, along with their perceptions and assessments of being poor in the context of the economic crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a qualitative study through 24 in-depth interviews with people seeking food aid from the Red Cross Non-Governmental Organization. The special focus here is comparison of two types of households: those affected for the first time by the economic crisis and new to seeking food aid and those who have claimed food aid since before the crisis.

Findings

The results show that, despite similarities of situation, the two groups deal with food poverty differently. The “old” group rely on skills derived from experience and have more complex survival strategies. The “new” group react by adjusting how they obtain food, but limited knowledge of the environment and inexperience in dealing with the situation restricts their options. Their different ways of dealing with deprivation are related to how they interpret the crisis and their perception of themselves as receivers of food aid.

Social implications

These results underline the importance of food aid for both types of household presenting the State as a necessary safety net for them to cope successfully with crisis and rise from poverty.

Originality/value

This comparison offers a novel contribution to traditional studies of food poverty because it deepens knowledge of a little known group and enables us to advance some explanations of how the passage of time impacts food poverty.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

John Byrom, Dominic Medway and Gary Warnaby

Considers the topic of food retailing in rural areas, a subject that has been barely researched of late. This is achieved through a case study of the Uist chain in the…

Abstract

Considers the topic of food retailing in rural areas, a subject that has been barely researched of late. This is achieved through a case study of the Uist chain in the southern Western Isles of Scotland. Although there has been previous work on food retailing in this area, this has largely been from a consumer‐led perspective. The research presented here takes a provider‐oriented approach, involving a census of retail businesses on the Uists and interviews with owner‐managers of food retail outlets. Specifically, the role of the customer base, logistics and supply, and legislative and economic issues are discussed. In conclusion, it is suggested that future research should concentrate on combining consumer‐ and provider‐led perspectives, investigate the role of effective management in small rural retail businesses, and assess whether such findings are generalisable to other rural areas.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Preeti Virdi, Arti D. Kalro and Dinesh Sharma

Decision aids (DAs) in online retail stores ease consumers' information processing. However, online consumers do not use all decision aids in purchase decision-making…

Abstract

Purpose

Decision aids (DAs) in online retail stores ease consumers' information processing. However, online consumers do not use all decision aids in purchase decision-making. While the literature has documented the effects of individual decision aids or two decision aids at a time, no study has compared the efficacy of multiple decision aids simultaneously. Also, very few studies have looked at the use of decision aids for consumers with maximizing and satisficing tendencies. Hence, this study aims to understand the preferences of maximizers and satisficers towards online decision aids during the choice-making process.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an observational study with 60 individuals who were asked to purchase either a search-based or an experience-based product online. Participants' browsing actions and verbalizations during online shopping, were recorded and analysed using NVivo, and later the use of decision aids was mapped along their choice process.

Findings

Consumer's preference of decision aids varies across the two stages of the choice process (that is, consideration set formation and evaluation & choice). In their choice formation, maximizers use different decision aids in both stages, that is, filter tool and in-website search tool for search products, and collaborative filtering-based recommender systems and eWOM for experience products. Satisficers used more decision aids as compared to maximizers across the two stages for both product types.

Originality/value

This study is an exploratory attempt to understand how consumers use multiple decision aids present on e-commerce websites.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Simone Pettigrew, Katherine Mizerski and Robert Donovan

The senior market is becoming more attractive as older consumers come to comprise a greater proportion of the population and control a greater proportion of national…

Abstract

Purpose

The senior market is becoming more attractive as older consumers come to comprise a greater proportion of the population and control a greater proportion of national assets. The purpose of this study was to examine older shoppers' experiences in Australian supermarkets to identify the three issues of most concern to seniors and provide practical recommendations to managers.

Design/methodology/approach

Six focus groups yielded the three major issues which were then tested via a national telephone survey (n=505).

Findings

The major issues identified included the demeanour of supermarket employees, the functionality of shopping equipment (i.e. trolleys and baskets), and the appropriate placement of products on supermarket shelves. Respondents considered these issues to be personally relevant and important to seniors in general.

Practical implications

Supermarket managers should develop strategies to ensure staff are recruited and trained in such a fashion as to enable them to engage in satisfying interactions with older customers. Other areas requiring attention include thorough product stocking to prevent over‐reaching and the provision of well‐designed and functioning shopping aids in the form of trolleys and baskets. Further issues raised in the focus groups that are worthy of consideration by supermarket managers and other retailers are merchandise quality, adequate access to and within the store, in‐store amenities, home delivery options, seniors' discounts, and avoiding extended queuing. These service aspects appear to be of particular importance to older shoppers.

Originality/value

The findings support previous research that has highlighted the need for retailers to take seniors' needs into consideration in service provision.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

RL Davies

Tesco, Gateshead metropolitan borough council and the University of Newcastle have developed a computer‐aided shopping service aimed at bringing the advantages of the…

Abstract

Tesco, Gateshead metropolitan borough council and the University of Newcastle have developed a computer‐aided shopping service aimed at bringing the advantages of the superstore to those people who are either housebound or confined to shopping in a local area. The service is based in a branch library in an inner city neighbourhood and uses modern point of sale equipment to effect the ordering and delivery of goods, and Prestel to provide information about both shopping opportunities and matters of local community concern. Bob Davies describes the philosophy behind it and how this pilot scheme has developed practically.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article

Lorna Ruane and Elaine Wallace

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationships Generation Y females have with fashion brands online. Specifically, it examines the role of the internet and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationships Generation Y females have with fashion brands online. Specifically, it examines the role of the internet and social networks in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Narrative interviews were employed to gather data from Generation Y women. Analysis was conducted using inductive thematic analysis.

Findings

Two main themes emerged from the data: the importance of social media and the influence of the internet. Findings suggest social networks have a significant influence on the dynamics of brand consumption and inform our understanding of females' online shopping behaviours.

Research limitations/implications

A qualitative methodology was utilised to elicit insights from consumers. This allowed participants to express their thoughts in their own words, which provided rich data for analysis.

Practical implications

We provide guidance for marketing managers seeking to harness social networks to market brands. Findings illustrate the role of social networks in driving brand consumption among Generation Y women, and highlight the criticality of the social network as a source of information and reassurance for brand choices. Further, we identify concerns about online shopping, and provide suggestions for online retailers seeking to augment consumers' shopping experiences.

Originality/value

This study offers insights into Generation Y females' use of the internet and social networks for brand consumption. To date such research has been mainly quantitative. Further, Generation Y has been neglected in the marketing literature. This paper addresses these gaps and illustrates the significant impact social media has on the behaviour of female consumers.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Content available
Article

Rodney Graeme Duffett and Crystal Foster

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there is a difference in the development of shopping lists and use of advertisements as pre-store food-buying practices…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether there is a difference in the development of shopping lists and use of advertisements as pre-store food-buying practices in terms of planned shopping by South African consumers who dwell in different socio-economic status (SES) areas. The paper also considers the influence of shopper and socio-demographic characteristics on pre-store food-buying practices in a developing country.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was used to survey 1 200 consumers in retail stores in low, middle and high SES areas in South Africa. A generalised linear model was employed for the statistical analysis of pre-store food-buying practices within the SES area groups in a developing country.

Findings

South African consumers that reside in high SES area displayed the largest of shopping list development, while consumers who dwell in low SES areas showed the highest incidence of advertisement usage. Several shopper and socio-demographic characteristics were also found to have an influence on pre-store food-buying practices in different SES areas in South Africa.

Research limitations/implications

A qualitative approach would offer a deeper understanding of consumers’ pre-store food shopping predispositions as opposed to the quantitative approach, which was adopted for this study. A longitudinal design would also provide a more extensive representation of pre-store food shopping practices over a longer time frame than cross-sectional research. The survey was conducted on Saturdays, whereas consumers who shop during the week may have different shopping and socio-demographic characteristics.

Practical implications

Astute food brands, marketers and grocery stores could use the findings of this study to assist with their marketing efforts that they direct at consumers in different SES areas in South Africa and other developing countries.

Social implications

The findings of this study may assist consumers in developing countries, especially those who reside in low SES areas, with food-buying strategies to reduce food costs, make wiser purchase decisions and reduce shopping.

Originality/value

No study (to the best of the researchers’ knowledge) has considered shopping list development and use of advertisements’ pre-store food-buying practices in different SES areas in a developing country. Furthermore, there is a dearth of research analysing shopper and socio-demographic characteristics in relation to pre-store food-buying practices among different SES areas in developing and developed countries.

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Article

Komal Chopra

The purpose of this paper is to understand motivation of young consumers to use artificial intelligence (AI) tools such as chatbots, voice assistants and augmented reality…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand motivation of young consumers to use artificial intelligence (AI) tools such as chatbots, voice assistants and augmented reality in shopping by generating Vroom’s expectancy theory of motivation using grounded theory approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theory approach has been used to develop the Vroom’s expectancy theory. Initially data were collected through participant interviews using theoretical sampling. These data were analyzed and coded using the three step process, i.e. open coding, axial coding and selective coding. The categories created during coding were integrated to generate Vroom’s expectancy theory of motivation.

Findings

The findings indicate that Vroom’s expectancy theory of motivation can be used to explain motivation of young consumers to use AI tools as an aid in taking shopping decisions. The motivation may be intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation or force choice motivation. Expectancy represents the ease of using the tools, instrumentality represents competence of tools in performing desired tasks while valence represents satisfaction, rewarding experience and trust in using of tools.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study are based on grounded theory approach which is an inductive approach. Alternate research methodologies, both inductive and deductive, need to be employed to strengthen the external validity and generalize the results. The study is limited to shopping motives of young consumers in India. A comparison with other consumer motivational studies has not been done. Hence no claim is made regarding the advantage of Vroom’s theory over other motivational theories.

Practical implications

The study has strong implications for retailers in developing countries which are seen as an emerging market for retail and have introduced AI tools in recent years. The Vroom’s expectancy theory will help retailers to understand consumer motivation in using AI tools or shopping.

Originality/value

Vroom’s expectancy theory to understand consumer motivation to use AI tools in shopping was generated using the grounded theory approach.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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